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How to Use Czech Numbers for Daily Usage

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Especially if you’re planning a prolonged visit to Czech Republic, using the correct Czech numbers for counting in Czech could be very important! Number systems are the other alphabet in any language. In fact, it is a language all of its own, and it serves a multitude of excellent purposes.

Table of Contents

  1. A Brief History of Counting and Number Systems
  2. Why is it Important to Learn Czech Numbers?
  3. Learning Czech Numbers
  4. Why Choose CzechClass101 to Learn all about Czech Numbers?

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1. A Brief History of Counting and Number Systems

Abacus

1. The Ishango Bone

The origin of counting, and with it numbers, is not clear to historians. While their art showed that prehistoric man had a concept of numbers, the first indication of a formal system was found to be only between 20,000 and 35,000 thousand years old. This discovery came around 1960 in the form of the so-called Ishango Bone found in the Congo, Central Africa.

The 10cm/4 inch piece of bone was a fibula from a baboon. It showed markings with a neat, unified pattern of small lines - far too organized and sophisticated to have formed spontaneously. Archeologists believe that those thin markings were carved to keep score of, or count, something. The lines seemed to represent a sequence of prime numbers and a series of duplications. Some even called it the first-ever pocket calculator!

2. Mesopotamia and Greece

Yet, evidence suggests that it wasn’t until about 4,000 years ago that humans truly started counting and using numbers. Together with the development of civilization came developed agriculture, and the need for measurement and score-keeping was increased.

For this reason, a formal number system and mathematics were developed first in the Middle East, in what was then called Mesopotamia. Mesopotamia was roughly situated in the area of modern-day Iraq and Kuwait. Allegedly, the system was pretty simple at first. Citizens used tokens that represented a certain number of items, such as one token equalling four goats, etc. This eventually evolved into a system of score marks pressed into clay, which ultimately went on to influence Greek mathematics.

3. Hindu-Arabic Numbers

Zero, meanwhile, was conceived later and elsewhere. Inspired by the Hindu religion, which allows for the concept of infinity and eternity, the Indians invented a symbol to represent nothing. The magic of the zero lies not in itself but its combination with other numbers.

The Indians were also the creators of today’s numbers, which are often referred to as Hindu-Arabic numbers. These comprise one or a combination of just ten symbols or digits: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and 0.

Europe learned of this numeric system only around 1200 A.D., when they were introduced to it by an Italian mathematician called Leonardo Pisano Bigollo.

Pisano, also known as Fibonacci, is famous for the discovery of a mathematical sequence with countless applications. Yes, math buffs, it’s the well-known Fibonacci sequence, also called the Golden Mean.

The Roman numeric system, which was clumsy next to the newer inventions, gradually lost popularity in the West. It’s from here that they “slowly spread to conquer the world,'’ as Steven Law puts it.


2. Why is it Important to Learn Czech Numbers?

For us at CzechClass101, this is an easy question to answer! Because we know that numbers are a global unifier.

Counting and numbers have made our lives easier since they were first formulated, even in their most primitive forms.

Numbers in Industry

Without knowing your numbers, you can’t properly communicate about or deal with the following:

1) Your date/time of birth, i.e., your age: This is vital information to be able to give to people like doctors, employers, law enforcement, and so forth.

2) Banking: Worldwide, our monetary systems are built on numbers. Interest, credit scores, and loans all rely on math beyond simple finger counting.

3) Time: Without knowing how to say numbers, you can’t talk or ask about the time and expect to get a useful response. You don’t want to miss an appointment or schedule something for the wrong hour!

4) Ordering data: Numbers bring order to a mostly random life! Scientists even say that numbers and the way they are organized underpin the whole universe. From using them to count your meals’ calories and the number of likes your posts get on social media, to drawing up intricate data charts and explaining existence itself - numbers are what makes these things possible.

All of the above and more are reasons why it is important to know your numbers if you plan on travelling or becoming a foreign worker abroad, in Czech Republic or anywhere else!

Little Girl Counting


3. Learning Czech Numbers

Now, let’s explore the Czech number system a bit more! Take a look at this infographic.

Language Numbers

Can you make out for yourself what the Czech numbers between one (1) and nine (9) look and sound like? Easy, right?

Or, if you struggled a bit, no problem. Why not listen to how Czech numbers one (1) through ten (10) sound when pronounced by our native Czech speaker and friendly CzechClass101 teacher?

Then, share with us in the comments your native language’s romanized pronunciation of your number system. We’d love to see all the different ways the same numbers can be pronounced!

Hand With a Thumbs Up

When you have mastered the first ten numbers, you have basically nailed the most significant part of the number system. Well done! Curious to learn the numbers from eleven upward? No problem! Why not subscribe and enroll with us now to immediately enjoy this lesson, teaching you all about Czech numbers eleven (11) to one hundred (100)?

Finally, if you’re curious how the numbers look once you’ve broken one hundred, why not check out our Czech number vocabulary page? You can see the numbers we’ve just covered, all the way up to four thousand (4,000). Plus, you can also see the Czech words for different numbers used in example sentences, to get an idea of how you can use them in your day-to-day conversations!


4. Why Choose CzechClass101 to Learn all about Czech Numbers?

CzechClass101, like all Innovative Language Learning ventures, takes the pain out of learning a new language by adding a lot of fun. It’s never an easy thing to learn a new language, but we formulated all your lessons so they’re nicely bite-sized, and geared to keep you motivated!

Also, we created a great number of fantastic tools to help keep struggle and boredom out of the learning process.

  • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn - what a beautiful cycle! CzechClass101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective, and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect with! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Czech!
  • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android, and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
  • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Czech with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account - for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Czech dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about CzechClass101…!
  • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. You can have your very own Czech teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to - what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
  • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Czech word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Czech level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

So, why wait? Sign up with CzechClass101 right away! Also, let us know in the comments if you’ve used this blog post, or any of the free lessons anywhere to master Czech numbers. Or, even better - share your birthdate using what you’ve learned!

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How To Post In Perfect Czech on Social Media

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You’re learning to speak Czech, and it’s going well. Your confidence is growing! So much so that you feel ready to share your experiences on social media—in Czech.

At Learn Czech, we make this easy for you to get it right the first time. Post like a boss with these phrases and guidelines, and get to practice your Czech in the process.

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1. Talking about Your Restaurant Visit in Czech

Eating out is fun, and often an experience you’d like to share. Take a pic, and start a conversation on social media in Czech. Your friend will be amazed by your language skills…and perhaps your taste in restaurants!

Libor plans to eat at a restaurant with his friends, posts an image of the food, and leaves this comment:

POST

Let’s break down Libor’s post.

Pojďme se někam najíst. Není nad to dobře se navečeřet!
“Let’s go out to eat somewhere. There is nothing better than a good dinner!”

1- Pojďme se někam najíst.

First is an expression meaning “Let’s go out to eat somewhere.”
The first expression is a very common way to make an offer to somebody for something. In this particular situation, the speaker suggests that the group goes out and eat together, which is definitely a frequent and desirable expression in everyday life.

2- Není nad to dobře se navečeřet!

Then comes the phrase - “There is nothing better than a good dinner!.”
The first two words literally mean “there is nothing above.” This phrase is often used in daily conversation to emphasize how great something is.

COMMENTS

In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

1- Už se mi sbíhají sliny.

His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning - “That’s mouth watering.”
Use this expression as a positive opinion about the food in the picture.

2- Ale to vypadá báječně!

His supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning - “It looks delicious!”
This is another, more traditional way to give an opinion about the food.

3- Dáme si do nosu!

His girlfriend’s high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning - “Let’s have a blast!”
Use this expression to strongly agree with the poster’s suggestion.

4- Pěknou zábavu.

His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning - “Have a good time.”
This is a well-wish, most likely from someone who will not be joining the party.

VOCABULARY

Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • navečeřet se: “to have dinner”
  • sbíhají sliny: “mouth-watering”
  • báječně: “delicious”
  • dát si: “to have”
  • zábava: “fun”
  • najíst: “to eat”
  • někam: “somewhere”
  • vypadat: “to look like”
  • So, let’s practice a bit. If a friend posted something about having dinner with friends, which phrase would you use?

    Now go visit a Czech restaurant, and wow the staff with your language skills!

    2. Post about Your Mall Visit in Czech

    Another super topic for social media is shopping—everybody does it, most everybody loves it, and your friends on social media are probably curious about your shopping sprees! Share these Czech phrases in posts when you visit a mall.

    Jana shop with her sister at the mall, posts an image of the two of them, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    Potřebuji relax. Jde se nakupovat.
    “I need to relax. Let’s go shopping.”

    1- Potřebuji relax.

    First is an expression meaning “I need to relax.”
    This expression is often used when somebody wants to express that they are really tired and need a break.

    2- Jde se nakupovat.

    Then comes the phrase - “Let’s go shopping.”
    The first two words literally mean “It goes itself” in third person singular, but the meaning of this expression corresponds with the English phrase “Let’s go.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Nemáme peněz nazbyt.

    Her boyfriend, Libor, uses an expression meaning - “We don’t have money to spend”.
    Use this expression if you feel anxious about the budget for shopping, or if you want to joke a bit with the poster.

    2- Můžu jít s tebou?

    Her college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning - “Can I go with you?”
    With this question, you’re either serious about joining in the shopping, or it’s a way of saying that you wish you could go with.

    3- Rozjeď to Jani.

    Her high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning - “Bring it on, Jana.”
    Use this expression to be humorous and encouraging.

    4- Kup si něco pěkného.

    Her husband’s high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning - “Buy something nice.”
    Use this comment just to be part of the conversation in a casual, friendly manner.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • nakupovat: “to buy”
  • nemít: “not to have”
  • moci: “can”
  • rozjet to: “to bring it on”
  • pěkný: “nice”
  • potřebovat: “to need”
  • něco: “something”
  • to: “it”
  • So, if a friend posted something about going shopping, which phrase would you use?

    3. Talking about a Sport Day in Czech

    Sports events, whether you’re the spectator or the sports person, offer fantastic opportunity for great social media posts. Learn some handy phrases and vocabulary to start a sport-on-the-beach conversation in Czech.

    Libor plays with his friends at the beach, posts an image of the team playing, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    Nejlepší pro zdraví je pravidelně sportovat.
    “The best thing for your health is to play sports regularly. ”

    1- Nejlepší pro zdraví

    First is an expression meaning “The best thing for your health .”
    The first word is the adjective “best.” Next is the preposition, and the noun for “health.” This expression is often used when speaking about something healthy.

    2- je pravidelně sportovat.

    Then comes the phrase - “is to play sports regularly”.
    The English phrase “to play sports” is expressed in Czech by a verb.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ty máš ale vypracované tělo…

    His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning - “What a muscular body you have…”
    Use this expression if you wish to give a compliment.

    2- Sportem ku zdraví.

    His supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning - “Play sports to stay healthy.”
    Use this comment if you agree with the post, and simply wish to reiterate.

    3- Ve zdravém těle, zdravý duch.

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning - “Healthy body, healthy mind.”
    Another thought that elaborates along the same lines as the poster’s original post.

    4- Opatrně, ať tě neklepne pepka.

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Radim, uses an expression meaning - “Be careful not to get an infarct.”
    Use this expression if you wish to tease the poster with a rather dark warning to not overdo physical activity. An infarct is a heart attack.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • pravidelně: “regularly”
  • tělo: “body”
  • zdraví: “health”
  • duch: “spirit”
  • opatrně: “carefully”
  • zdravý : “healthy”
  • sport: “sport”
  • ty: “you”
  • Which phrase would you use if a friend posted something about sports?

    But sport is not the only thing you can play! Play some music, and share it on social media.

    4. Share a Song on Social Media in Czech

    Music is the language of the soul, they say. So, don’t hold back—share what touches your soul with your friends!

    Jana shares a song she just heard at a party, posts an image of the artist, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    Tuhle písničku miluji!
    “I love this song.”

    1- miluji!

    First is an expression meaning “I love”.
    This word is used to express our passion for somebody or something. Despite the fact that Czech people are more reserved in expressing their feelings than Americans, for example, it is a useful and frequent expression.

    2- Tuhle písničku

    Then comes the phrase - “this song.”
    The last word means “song” in the accusative case. The first word means “this.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- To je krása.

    Her neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning - “That’s beautiful.”
    Use this expression when you agree with the poster.

    2- Připomíná mi to naše první rande.

    Her boyfriend, Libor, uses an expression meaning - “It reminds me of our first date.”
    Use this expression if you wish to comment on the evocative nature of the song, and when its meaning is special for you and your girlfriend/special person.

    3- Zazpívej nám ji!

    Her high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning - “Sing it to us!”
    Use this expression to be humorous.

    4- No to je romantika.

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning - “Well, that’s romantic.”
    Use this expression to comment with a personal opinion regarding the song.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • milovat: “love”
  • krása: “beauty”
  • připomínat: “remind “
  • zazpívat: “to sing”
  • romantika: “romance”
  • školní: “school”
  • písnička: “song”
  • první: “first”
  • Which song would you share? And what would you say to a friend who posted something about sharing music or videos?

    Now you know how to start a conversation about a song or a video on social media!

    5. Czech Social Media Comments about a Concert

    Still on the theme of music—visiting live concerts and shows just have to be shared with your friends. Here are some handy phrases and vocab to wow your followers in Czech!

    Libor goes to a concert, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    Pojď, půjdem si zapařit.
    “Let’s party!”

    1- Pojď

    First is an expression meaning “Let’s go.”
    A very useful and common expression. It literally means “go!” and is the imperative of the verb “to go”.

    2- půjdem si zapařit.

    Then comes the phrase - ” we go party!.”
    The last word in this expression is a slang term for partying, which includes activities like drinking alcohol or dancing wildly at a concert or disco.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Přijďte brzo domů.

    His girlfriend, Jana, uses an expression meaning - “Come home early. ”
    Use this expression if you wish to tell the poster to do something.

    2- To je můj oblíbený zpěvák.

    His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning - “He’s my favorite singer.”
    Use this expression to share a personal opinion regarding the artist.

    3- Zpívá docela dobře.

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning - “He’s singing quite well.”
    This is another way of giving a personal opinion regarding the artist.

    4- Ti jedou, co.

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning - “They rock, don’t they?”
    Use this expression when you agree with the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • jít: “to go “
  • brzo: “early”
  • zpěvák: “singer”
  • dobře: “well”
  • jet: “to go “
  • pařit: “to party”
  • docela: “quite”
  • oblíbený: “favorite”
  • If a friend posted something about a concert, which phrase would you use?

    6. Talking about an Unfortunate Accident in Czech

    Oh dear. You broke something by accident. Use these Czech phrases to start a thread on social media. Or maybe just to let your friends know why you are not contacting them!

    Jana accidentally breaks her mobile phone, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    A je po telefonu…
    “And the phone is broken…”

    1- A je

    First is an expression meaning “And”.
    The first word is a conjunction that corresponds with the English “and.” Conjunctions connect sentences or words. In this phrase, where “and” is the first word in the sentence, it implies that something happened before the phone was dropped and broke.

    2- po telefonu…

    Then comes the phrase - “the phone is broken….”
    The first word is a preposition that can be translated into English in many ways. But in this phrase, it literally means “over.” So altogether the phrase means “The phone is over.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Můžeš si ho dát spravit.

    Her neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning - “It can be repaired.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted.

    2- Určitě bude ještě fungovat.

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning - “It’ll work, I’m sure.”
    Use this expression if you want to be encouraging.

    3- Stejně to byl starej krám.

    Her college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning - “Nevermind. It was an old thing.”
    This is a personal opinion you can share about the phone, trivializing the event.

    4- Neříkal jsem ti, abys dávala pozor.

    Her nephew, Radim, uses an expression meaning - “Didn’t I tell you to be careful?”
    Use this expression to partake in the conversation in a lighthearted manner. However, it could come across as pedantic, so be sure that the poster will understand your intent.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • telefon: “phone”
  • spravit: “to repair”
  • určitě: “certainly”
  • starej krám: “old thing”
  • říkat: “to say”
  • fungovat: “to work”
  • pozor: “to be careful”
  • neříkat: “not to say”
  • If a friend posted something about having broken something by accident, which phrase would you use?

    So, now you know how to discuss an accident in Czech. Well done!

    7. Chat about Your Boredom on Social Media in Czech

    Sometimes, we’re just bored with how life goes. And to alleviate the boredom, we write about it on social media. Add some excitement to your posts by addressing your friends and followers in Czech!

    Libor gets bored at home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    To je strašná nuda.
    “I’m terribly bored.”

    1- To je strašná

    First is an expression meaning “It is a terrible”.
    The adjective that corresponds with the English word “terrible” is used to express a huge quantity of our emotions. It can be used to describe something positive or negative. Most Czech adjectives have different masculine, feminine, or neuter forms. This adjective is in the feminine form.

    2- nuda.

    Then comes the phrase - “bore..”
    When Czech people want to describe something boring, they usually use this noun.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Tak ráda bych šla do kina.

    His girlfriend, Jana, uses an expression meaning - “I would like to go to the cinema. ”
    Use this expression to make a suggestion to the poster.

    2- Půjčím ti pěknou knížku.

    His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning - “I’ll lend you a nice book.”
    Use this expression if you wish to be helpful.

    3- Pojď mi pomoct okopávat brambory.

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning - “Come on, help me (to) harvest potatoes.”
    Use this expression if you are feeling frivolous and lighthearted.

    4- Zkus, jestli dokážeš levitovat.

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning - “Try to see if you can levitate.”
    Use this expression if you’re feeling humorous.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • strašná: “terrible”
  • kino: “cinema”
  • půjčit: “lend”
  • bambora: “potato”
  • jestli: “if”
  • zkusit: “to try”
  • levitovat: “levitate”
  • knížka: “book”
  • If a friend posted something about being bored, which phrase would you use?

    Still bored? Share another feeling and see if you can start a conversation!

    8. Exhausted? Share It on Social Media in Czech

    Sitting in public transport after work, feeling like chatting online? Well, converse in Czech about how you feel, and let your friends join in!

    Jana feels exhausted after a long day at work, posts an image of herself looking tired, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    Už nemůžu. Jsem úplně hotová.
    “I’m dying. I’m completely exhausted.”

    1- Už nemůžu

    First is an expression meaning “I am dying..”
    This phrase literally means “I can’t anymore.” Czech people use it to express that they can’t do something specific anymore.

    2- Jsem úplně hotová.

    Then comes the phrase - “I am completely exhausted.”
    This expression, which literally means “to be done,” is a popular phrase for expressing exhaustion. The last word is an adjective in the feminine form.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Za chvíli bude večeře.

    Her boyfriend, Libor, uses an expression meaning - “Dinner will be ready in a moment.”
    Use this expression if you want to be helpful and encouraging.

    2- Chvíli si odpočiň.

    Her neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning - “Rest for a while.”
    Make this suggestion to show you are warmhearted and caring.

    3- Myslím, že neumíš relaxovat.

    Her high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning - “You can’t relax, I think.”
    Use this expression to comment and make conversation by posting a personal opinion.

    4- Nechceš kávu?

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning - “Do you want some coffee?”
    Ask this question if you wish to make the poster an offer that could be helpful.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • úplně: “completely”
  • večeře: “dinner”
  • odpočinout si: “to rest”
  • myslet: “to think”
  • káva: “coffee”
  • nechtít: “not to want”
  • neumět: “cannot”
  • chvíle: “moment”
  • If a friend posted something about being exhausted, which phrase would you use?

    Now you know how to say you’re exhausted in Czech! Well done.

    9. Talking about an Injury in Czech

    So life happens, and you manage to hurt yourself during a soccer game. Very Tweet-worthy! Here’s how to do it in Czech.

    Libor suffers a painful injury, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    Zlomil jsem si ruku.
    “I broke my arm.”

    1- Zlomil jsem si

    First is an expression meaning “I broke my.”
    Czech verbs are sometimes accompanied by reflexive pronouns, which have a similar meaning to “self.” The phrase literally means “I broke myself…”

    2- ruku.

    Then comes the phrase - “arm..”
    This term originally meant “hand,” but is now used for both “arm” and “hand”. In Czech, a word that means “arm” exists, but it is used rarely and only in official documents. In spoken Czech, it is not used at all.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Chudáčku, co se ti stalo?

    His girlfriend, Jana, uses an expression meaning - “Oh poor you, what happened?”
    Use this expression if you are feeling sympathetic.

    2- Ještě žes ji nezlomil mně.

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning - “At least you didn’t break mine.”
    Use this expression to be lighthearted and humorous.

    3- Máš štěstí, že to není noha.

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning - “You’re lucky that it’s not a leg.”
    Comment this phrase if you wish to remind the poster that things could’ve been worse.

    4- Za tři týdny ti sundají sádru, vydrž.

    His high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning - “Hang in there. They’ll take your cast off in three weeks.”
    Use this expression if you wish to be supportive and optimistic in order to cheer up the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • zlomit: “to break”
  • co: “what”
  • mně: “me (dativ)”
  • noha: “leg”
  • týden: “week”
  • chudáček: “poor”
  • sádra: “cast”
  • ruka: “hand, arm”
  • If a friend posted something about being injured, which phrase would you use?

    We love to share our fortunes and misfortunes; somehow that makes us feel connected to others.

    10. Starting a Conversation Feeling Disappointed in Czech

    Sometimes things don’t go the way we planned. Share your disappointment about this with your friends!

    Jana feels disappointed about today’s weather, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    Nesnáším, když nám na dovolené prší.
    “I hate when it’s raining during my vacation.”

    1- Nesnáším, když

    First is an expression meaning “I hate when.”
    The first word, which means “to hate,” is widely used to express a negative attitude toward something or someone. This negative form Czech verb is considered a strong term. While the positive form of this verb means to “tolerate” or “undergo” something.

    2- nám na dovolené prší.

    Then comes the phrase - “it is raining during my vacation..”
    To express rainy weather, Czech people mostly use the verb that means “to rain.” Rarely is it used as a noun. The Czech language also has an adjective that means “rainy,” but this term is outdated and not used in spoken language.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Podle předpovědi mělo být slunečno.

    Her boyfriend, Libor, uses an expression meaning - “According to the forecast, it’s supposed to be sunny.”
    Use this phrase if you wish to make conversation by sharing something you know.

    2- Nám loni na dovolené taky pršelo.

    Her neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning - “It was also raining during my vacation last year.”
    This is another phrase to use to make conversation with personal news.

    3- Můžeš si zkusit zpívat v dešti.

    Her high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning - “You can try singing in the rain.”
    Use this expression to be humorous, referring to the old classic by Gene Kelly: “Singin’ in the rain”. It was a movie, with a song titled the same, released in the 1950s.

    4- Déšť je dobrý pro úrodu.

    Her supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning - “The rain is necessary for a good harvest.”
    Use this expression to remind the poster of the positives regarding the weather.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • nesnášet: “to hate”
  • předpověď: “forecast”
  • dovolená: “vacation”
  • zkusit: “to try”
  • déšť: “rain”
  • úroda: “harvest”
  • dobrý: “good”
  • ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,

  • pršet: “to rain”
  • How would you comment in Czech when a friend is disappointed?

    Not all posts need to be about a negative feeling, though!

    11. Talking about Your Relationship Status in Czech

    Don’t just change your relationship status in Settings, talk about it!

    Libor changes his status to “In a relationship”, posts an image of him and Jana, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    Toto je má drahá polovička.
    “This is my better half.”

    1- Toto je

    First is an expression meaning “This is.”
    The word corresponding with “this” has a different shape in Czech depending on its gender: masculine, feminine, or neuter. In this expression, the speaker introduces his girlfriend. However, it is custom in Czech phraseology to use the neuter form of “this.”

    2- má drahá polovička.

    Then comes the phrase - “my better half.”
    This expression refers to somebody we love.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Gratuluji!

    His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations!”
    This is the traditional congratulation fitting for this occasion.

    2- Ať vám to klape.

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning - “Good luck.”
    Use this expression if you wish to be humorous with sarcasm.

    3- No konečně!

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning - “Finally!”
    Use this expression to indicate that you’ve been expecting the news, and feel positive about it.

    4- Bezva!

    His high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning - “Great!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling good about the romantic match.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • toto: “this”
  • gratulovat: “to congratulate”
  • ať to klape: “good luck”
  • konečně: “finally”
  • bezva: “great”
  • drahá: “dear”
  • no: “well”
  • být: “to be”
  • What would you say in Czech when a friend changes their relationship status?

    Being in a good relationship with someone special is good news - don’t be shy to spread it!

    12. Post about Getting Married in Czech

    Wow, so things got serious, and you’re getting married. Congratulations! Or, your friend is getting married, so talk about this in Czech.

    Jana is getting married today, so she leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    Spolu navždy!
    “Together forever.”

    1- Spolu

    First is an expression meaning “Together.”
    This is a frequently used word in Czech that expresses the intention of doing something with another person.

    2- navždy!

    Then comes the phrase - “forever!.”
    A bit dramatic, this word is always suitable for important statements, especially about relationships.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Miluji tě!

    Her husband, Libor, uses an expression meaning - “I love you.”
    Use this expression to express your feelings to your beloved.

    2- Tichá voda břehy mele.

    Her high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning - “Still waters run deep.”
    Use this expression if you feel that the poster is secretive or unpredictable, but in a positive way.

    3- Jsem úplně dojatá.

    Her husband’s high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning - “I’m really moved.”
    Use this expression if you are really touched and happy about the news.

    4- Přeji vám všechno nejlepší.

    Her supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning - “I wish you all the best.”
    This is a traditional wish when someone announces news of this kind.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • spolu: “together”
  • milovat: “to love”
  • tichá: “quiet”
  • dojatá: “moved”
  • nejlepší: “best”
  • přát: “to wish”
  • voda: “water”
  • navždy: “forever”
  • How would you respond in Czech to a friend’s post about getting married?

    For the next topic, fast forward about two to three years into the future after the wedding…

    13. Announcing Big News in Czech

    Wow, huge stuff has been happening in your life! Announce it in Czech.

    Libor finds out he and his wife are going to have their second baby, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    Manželka je zase těhotná.
    “My wife is pregnant again.”

    1- Manželka je

    First is an expression meaning “My wife is.”
    The first word means “wife” in Czech. The personal pronoun “my” is usually omitted.

    2- zase těhotná.

    Then comes the phrase - “pregnant again..”
    The latter word, an adjective in the feminine form, is the Czech equivalent of the English word “pregnant.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Taková radostná událost. Blahopřeji.

    His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning - “Such a happy event. Congratulations!”
    Use this expression if you are happy for the couple, and to congratulate them.

    2- Bude to kluk nebo holka?

    His wife’s high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning - “Will it be a boy or a girl?”
    Ask this question to keep the conversation going and if you want to know the baby’s gender.

    3- Co to bude tentokrát?

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning - “What will it be this time?”
    This is another way of asking the same as the previous poster about the gender of the baby.

    4- Až se narodí, tak to oslavíme, tatíku.

    His nephew, Radim, uses an expression meaning - “After it’s born, let’s celebrate, daddy.”
    Use this expression if you are happy for the couple and wish to celebrate with the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • těhotná: “pregnant”
  • událost: “affair”
  • kluk: “boy”
  • tentokát: “this time”
  • narodit se: “to be born”
  • holka: “girl”
  • tatík: “daddy”
  • oslavit: “to celebrate”
  • Which phrase would you choose when a friend announces their pregnancy on social media?

    So, talking about a pregnancy will get you a lot of traction on social media. But wait till you see the responses to babies!

    14. Posting Czech Comments about Your Baby

    Your bundle of joy is here, and you cannot keep quiet about it! Share your thoughts in Czech.

    Jana plays with her baby, posts an image of the little one, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    To je náš chlapeček.
    “This is our boy.”

    1- To je

    First is an expression meaning “This is.”
    The first word is a point pronoun; the second word is the verb “to be,” in third person singular.

    2- náš chlapeček.

    Then comes the phrase - “our boy..”
    The first word is the possessive pronoun for “our” in the masculine form. The latter word means “boy” in the diminutive form.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Celý tatínek.

    Her husband, Libor, uses an expression meaning - “Looks like the father.”
    Use this comment to share your opinion, in this case that you think the baby resembles his dad.

    2- Gratuluji mamince a tatínkovi.

    Her supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations to momma and papa.”
    This is a traditional but casual way to congratulating the parents.

    3- Silák po tatínkovi.

    Her college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning - “He is strong like his father. ”
    Another personal opinion about the baby’s appearance.

    4- Ten je krásný!

    Her husband’s high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning - “Such a handsome boy!”
    And another opinion, complimenting the child’s physical appearance.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • náš: “our”
  • tatínek: “daddy”
  • gratulovat: “to congratulate”
  • silák: “strong boy”
  • krásný: “handsome”
  • a: “and”
  • být: “to be”
  • maminka: “mom”
  • If your friend is the mother or father, which phrase would you use on social media?

    Congratulations, you know the basics of chatting about a baby in Czech! But we’re not done with families yet…

    15. Czech Comments about a Family Reunion

    Family reunions - some you love, some you hate. Share about it on your feed.

    Libor goes to a family gathering, posts an image of the food, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    Koláče naší babičky. Nejlepší na světě.
    “Our grandma’s cakes. Best in the world.”

    1- Koláče naší babičky.

    First is an expression meaning “Our grandma’s cakes..”
    This sentence starts with the noun “cake” in plural form; the next two words are the personal pronoun “our” and the noun “grandma” in the genitive case.

    2- Nejlepší na světě.

    Then comes the phrase - “Best in the world..”
    The first word means the same as “the best.” The latter words are the preposition and the noun.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Vypadají báječně.

    His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning - “They look delicious.”
    Use this expression to share your thoughts on the food’s appearance.

    2- Nedržíš náhodou dietu?

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning - “Aren’t you on a diet?”
    Use this expression to tease the poster.

    3- Dostávám na ně chuť.

    His nephew, Radim, uses an expression meaning - “I’m building an appetite for them.”
    Use this expression to make conversation and share your feelings about the cakes.

    4- Ať neztloustneš!

    His wife’s high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t get fat!”
    Use this expression to be humorous.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • koláč: “cake”
  • vypadat: “to look like”
  • dieta: “diet”
  • chuť: “appetite”
  • minulý: “last”
  • ztloustnout: “to get fat”
  • svět: “world”
  • babička: “grandma”
  • Which phrase is your favorite to comment on a friend’s photo about a family reunion?

    16. Post about Your Travel Plans in Czech

    So, the family are going on holiday. Do you know to post and leave comments in Czech about being at the airport, waiting for a flight?

    Jana waits at the airport for her flight, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    Konečně začíná dovolená!
    “The holiday finally starts!”

    1- Konečně začíná

    First is an expression meaning “finally starts!.”
    The latter word means the same as the English verb “to start” in third person singular form.

    2- dovolená!

    Then comes the phrase - “The holiday.”
    This Czech term for “holiday” is derived from the verb meaning “to allow” or “to permit.” People are allowed or permitted to take a day off.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Pěkně si ji užijte.

    Her neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning - “Enjoy it.”
    Use this expression to wish the poster well for the holiday.

    2- Až přijedeš, musíš mi ukázat fotky.

    Her husband’s high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning - “You have to show me photos when you come back.”
    Use this expression if you would like to know the details of the holiday afterwards.

    3- Ať vám vyjde počasí!

    Her supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning - “Hopefully, the weather will turn out fine for you!”
    This comment is a way to make conversation with the weather as a topic.

    4- Pak mi zavolej, půjdem na kafe.

    Her college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning - “Call me after you get here. We’ll have some coffee together.”
    Use this expression to make conversation, and invite the poster for coffee when they return.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • konečně: “finally”
  • užít: “to enjoy”
  • fotka: “photo”
  • počasí: “weather”
  • zavolat: “to call”
  • dovolená: “holiday”
  • kafe: “coffee”
  • jít: “to go”
  • Choose and memorize your best airport phrase in Czech!

    Hopefully the rest of the trip is better!

    17. Posting about an Interesting Find in Czech

    So maybe you’re strolling around at your local market, and find something interesting. Here are some handy Czech phrases!

    Libor finds an unusual item at a local market, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    To je ale rozkošná věcička.
    “What a lovely thing.”

    1- To je ale

    First is an expression meaning “What .”
    Literally, this phrase means “it is but.” It’s the Czech equivalent to the conjunction “but” and has a similar meaning to the English word “what.” It expresses that the speaker is admiring something.

    2- rozkošná věcička.

    Then comes the phrase - “a lovely thing!.”
    After the first word, an adjective meaning “lovely,” is the word meaning “thing” in its diminutive form. This construction occurs often in the Czech language.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- To se mi líbí.

    His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning - “I like it.”
    Use this expression to share your positive opinion of the find.

    2- Takové už máme doma tři.

    His wife, Jana, uses an expression meaning - “We already have three like that at home.”
    Use this expression to make conversation with personal details.

    3- Tohle je taky dobré.

    His high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning - “This is also good.”
    Use this phrase when you have a photo to share and want to make conversation.

    4- To chci taky.

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning - “I want it too.”
    Use this expression to indicate that you like the find.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • rozkošná: “lovely”
  • líbit se: “to like”
  • doma: “at home”
  • dobré: “good”
  • taky: “also”
  • tři: “three”
  • chtít: “to want”
  • mít: “to have”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s interesting find?

    Perhaps you will even learn the identity of your find! Or perhaps you’re on holiday, and visiting interesting places…

    18. Post about a Sightseeing Trip in Czech

    Let your friends know what you’re up to in Czech, especially when visiting a remarkable place! Don’t forget the photo.

    Jana visits a famous landmark, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    Konečně jsme tu a stojí to za to.
    “We are finally here and it’s worth it.”

    1- Konečně jsme tu

    First is an expression meaning “We are finally here.”
    The structure of this expression is basically the same in English.

    2- a stojí to za to.

    Then comes the phrase - “and it is worth it..”
    This expression is often used in spoken Czech. It literally means that something costs some price, but the price is more than reasonable.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- To jsou ale panoramata!

    Her supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning - “Such a wonderful panorama!”
    Use this expression to show you are impressed with the view.

    2- To je moc pěkné!

    Her husband’s high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning - “It is very nice!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic about the location.

    3- Tam bych taky chtěla.

    Her neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning - “I’d like to also go there.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling some envy and wish to visit the place too.

    4- Proč jste mě nevzali s sebou.

    Her high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning - “Why didn’t you take me with you?”
    Use this expression to pretend you’re feeling excluded. It’s a form of humour to keep a conversation going.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • stát za něco: “worth it”
  • panoramata: “panorama”
  • pěkné: “nice”
  • chtít: “to want”
  • proč: “why”
  • nevzít: “not to take”
  • mě: “me “
  • moc: “very”
  • Which phrase would you prefer when a friend posts about a famous landmark?

    Share your special places with the world. Or simply post about your relaxing experiences.

    19. Post about Relaxing Somewhere in Czech

    So you’re doing nothing yet you enjoy that too? Tell your social media friends about it in Czech!

    Libor relaxes at a beautiful place, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    To je pohoda.
    “It’s relaxing.”

    1- To je

    First is an expression meaning “It is.”
    This phrase consists of two words. The first one is the personal pronoun “it” and the latter one is the verb “to be” in its third person singular form.

    2- pohoda.

    Then comes the phrase - “relaxing..”
    One of the most common Czech terms, this word can mean “relax,” “peace,” something “comfortable,” etc.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Vy si teda užíváte.

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning - “You seem to be enjoying it. ”
    Use this expression to agree with the poster.

    2- Pěkně si odpočiněte.

    His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning - “Get comfortable.
    This is a suggestion that’s simply a way to keep the conversation going.

    3- Vy se máte. Tady prší a má musím do práce.

    His wife’s high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning - “I envy you. It’s raining here and I have to go to work.”
    Use this expression to indicate that you’re envious and to share some personal news.

    4- To vypadá krásně.

    His supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning - “It looks beautiful.”
    Use this comment if you think the scenery is beautiful.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • být: “to be”
  • vy : “you”
  • odpočinout si: “to get relaxed”
  • pršet: “to rain”
  • krásně: “beautifully”
  • práce: “work”
  • do: “to”
  • muset: “must”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s feed?

    The break was great, but now it’s time to return home.

    20. What to Say in Czech When You’re Home Again

    And you’re back! What will you share with friends and followers?

    Jana returns home after a vacation, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    Konečně doma.
    “Finally home.”

    1- Konečně

    First is an expression meaning “Finally.”
    This word often stands at the beginning of a Czech sentence, especially when the speaker uses expressive language.

    2- doma.

    Then comes the phrase - “home..”
    This Czech word is derived from the word “house,” and there is in fact only a slight difference between them.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Jak jste se měli?

    Her neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning - “How was it?”
    Ask this question if you wish to get more information.

    2- Zpátky do reality.

    Her high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning - “Back to reality.”
    Use this expression to keep the conversation going with a personal observation.

    3- Vítejte zpátky.

    Her supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning - “Welcome back.”
    This is a traditional way to welcome someone back after travels.

    4- Už víte, kam pojedete příště?

    Her husband’s high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning - “Do you know where to go next?”
    Ask this question to be part of the conversation and to know more details.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • doma: “at home”
  • jak: “how”
  • zpátky: “back”
  • vítat: “to welcome”
  • příště: “next”
  • kam: “where”
  • vědět: “to know”
  • realita: “reality”
  • How would you welcome a friend back from a trip?

    What do you post on social media during a religious holiday, such as Easter?

    21. It’s Time to Celebrate in Czech

    It’s a religious holiday and you wish to post something about it on social media. What would you say?

    Libor and his family plan to observe a traditional Easter, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    Jde se na mrskut.
    “We are going to Easter whip.”

    1- Jde se

    First is an expression meaning “We are going.”
    In this Czech phrase, the word “to go” is used in its third person singular form, literally meaning “it goes.” But when using this phrase, we say that we are going somewhere, or we encourage somebody to go with us.

    2- na mrskut.

    Then comes the phrase - “to Easter’s whip..”
    Easter’s whip refers to a unique and rather odd Czech Easter tradition: boys equipped with whips made from young willow branches visit girls’ houses and gently beat them on their back sides to preserve their beauty and health. Men are given nicely colored eggs for doing this.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Pěkně všechny vymrskejte.

    His supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning - “Whip all of them properly.”
    This is a traditional response.

    2- To aby si dala do kalhot polštář.

    His wife’s high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning - “Better put a pillow in my trousers.”
    Use this expression to be humorous.

    3- Stavte se taky u nás.

    His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning - “Come by.”
    Use this expression to be inviting.

    4- Schválně, kdo dostane víc vajec.

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning - “Let’s see who will get more Easter eggs.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling frivolous and want to partake in the conversation.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • mrskut: “whip”
  • vymrskat: “to whip”
  • kalhoty: “trousers”
  • stavit se: “come by”
  • dostat: “to get “
  • víc: “more”
  • vajíčko: “egg”
  • polštář: “pillow”
  • If a friend posted something about a holiday, which phrase would you use?

    Easter and other religious holidays are not the only special ones to remember!

    22. Posting about a Birthday on Social Media in Czech

    Your friend or you are celebrating your birthday in an unexpected way. Be sure to share this on social media!

    Jana goes to her birthday party, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    Děkuji moc všem za tak krásné překvapení.
    “Thank you all for such a wonderful surprise.”

    1- Děkuji moc všem

    First is an expression meaning “Thank you all.”
    The first word is the verb that corresponds with the English word “to thank.” In this sentence it is used in its first person singular form. The ending of this Czech verb is different according to its conjugation.

    2- za tak krásné překvapení.

    Then comes the phrase - “for such a wonderful surprise..”
    The last word of this phrase corresponds with the English term “surprise.” The previous word is the adjective taking its neuter form in accordance with the noun.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Všechno nejlepší k narozeninám!

    Her neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning - “Happy birthday!”
    This is a traditional birthday wish.

    2- Dnes je tvůj velký den!

    Her high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning - “Today is your great day!”
    Use this comment to keep the conversation going.

    3- Hodně zdraví a štěstí.

    Her husband, Libor, uses an expression meaning - “Good luck and health.”
    This is another fairly traditional birthday wish.

    4- Kolik ti je?

    Her college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning - “How old are you?”
    Ask this question if you want more personal detail about the poster’s birthday.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • všichni: “everybody “
  • narozeniny: “birthday”
  • dnes: “today”
  • štěstí: “luck”
  • je: “is”
  • den: “day”
  • velký: “great”
  • překvapení: “surprise”
  • If a friend posted something about birthday greetings, which phrase would you use?

    23. Talking about New Year on Social Media in Czech

    Impress your friends with your Czech New Year’s wishes this year. Learn the phrases easily!

    Libor celebrates the New Year, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    Šťastný Nový rok!
    “Happy New Year!”

    1- Šťastný

    First is an expression meaning “Happy.”
    This adjective is a staple of the most common Czech New Year’s greeting.

    2- Nový rok!

    Then comes the phrase - “New Year!.”
    This phrase, which usually starts with a capital letter, is the Czech equivalent of the word “new.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Vám také! Ať se daří.

    His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning - “And to you too! All the best.”
    This is the appropriate, traditional response to the poster’s New Year’s wish.

    2- Nelučte se se starým rokem střízliví.

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning - “Don’t say goodbye to the previous year sober.”
    Use this expression to be humorous and to advise the poster to have a good time leaving the past behind.

    3- Všechno nejlepší do nového roku.

    His high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning - “All the best in the new year.”
    This is another positive, traditional New Year’s wish.

    4- Ať lítají rychlé špunty!

    His wife’s high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning - “Let the corks fly!”
    This is another way of saying: “Let’s party!”

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • šťastný: “happy”
  • také: “also”
  • loučit se: “to say goodbye “
  • nejlepší: “the best”
  • špunt: “cork”
  • lítat: “to fly”
  • nový: “new”
  • starý: “old”
  • Which is your favorite phrase to post on social media during New Year?

    But before New Year’s Day comes another important day…

    24. What to Post on Christmas Day in Czech

    What will you say in Czech about Christmas?

    Jana celebrates Christmas with her family, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    Pěkné prožití svátků vánočních.
    “Merry Christmas to you all.”

    1- Pěkné prožití

    First is an expression meaning “Nice experience.”
    This is the beginning of the second most common Christmas greeting. It literally means “nice living through” the Christmas.

    2- svátků vánočních.

    Then comes the phrase - “Christmas..”
    The second part of this formal greeting literally means “Christmas holidays.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- To bude dárků!

    Her high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning - “Looking forward to the gifts!”
    Use this expression to comment on the gifts, which is part of Christmas traditions in many cultures.

    2- Už máte nastrojený stromeček?

    Her college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning - “Did you already prepare the Christmas tree?”
    Ask this question to keep the conversation going, and to find out more details.

    3- Veselé vánoce!

    Her supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning - “Merry Christmas!”
    This is the common response to the poster’s Christmas blessing.

    4- Právě smažím kapra.

    Her husband’s high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning - “I’m just frying the carp.”
    Carp is a traditional Christmas dish, so this comment relates to the Christmas dinner.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • svátky vánoční: “Christmas holidays”
  • dárek: “gift”
  • stromeček: “Christmas tree”
  • veselé: “merry”
  • kapr: “carp”
  • smažit: “to fry”
  • právě: “just”
  • vánoce: “Christmas”
  • If a friend posted something about Christmas greetings, which phrase would you use?

    So, the festive season is over! Yet, there will always be other days, besides a birthday, to wish someone well.

    25. Post about Your Anniversary in Czech

    Some things deserve to be celebrated, like wedding anniversaries. Learn which Czech phrases are meaningful and best suited for this purpose!

    Libor celebrates his wedding anniversary with his wife, posts an image of him and Jana, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    Dneska máme výročí. Díky za všechno miláčku.
    “We have an anniversary today. Thank you for everything, darling.”

    1- Dneska máme výročí.

    First is an expression meaning “We have an anniversary today..”
    The first word means “today.” The second word is the verb “to have” in the first person plural form. And the last word means “anniversary.”

    2- Díky za všechno miláčku.

    Then comes the phrase - “Thanks for everything, darling..”
    The first word in this expression is a noun that means the same as the English word “thanks” and is used in informal spoken language. Formal Czech prefer to use the verb form, which corresponds to the English verb “to thank.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- To jsi mě dojal.

    His wife, Jana, uses an expression meaning - “Your message is very touching.”
    Use this expression to say that you really like your husband’s post.

    2- Gratuluji a přeji hodně dalších společných let.

    His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations. I wish you many years together.”
    This is a warmhearted wish for a happy marriage, as well as a traditional congratulation.

    3- Děti, polibte se.

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning - “Kiss each other, darlings.”
    This is a frivolous comment, using a term of endearment.

    4- Deset let spolu. Krásné!

    His supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning - “Ten years together. Wonderful!”
    This is a comment on the length of the marriage.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • výročí: “anniversary”
  • dojmout: “to touch”
  • přát: “to wish”
  • políbit : “to kiss”
  • deset: “ten”
  • spolu: “together”
  • hodně: “many”
  • léta: “years”
  • If a friend posted something about Anniversary greetings, which phrase would you use?

    Conclusion

    Learning to speak a new language will always be easier once you know key phrases that everybody uses. These would include commonly used expressions for congratulations and best wishes, etc.

    Master these in fun ways with Learn Czech! We offer a variety of tools to individualize your learning experience, including using cell phone apps, audiobooks, iBooks and many more. Never wonder again what to say on social media!

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    How to Say Sorry in Czech

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    Learn how to apologize in Czech - fast and accurately! CzechClass101 makes it easy for you to make amends. Start with a bonus, and download your FREE cheat sheet - How to Improve Your Czech Skills! (Logged-In Member Only)

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    Table of Contents

    1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Czech
    2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Czech
    3. Audio Lesson - Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”
    4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Czech through CzechClass101


    1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Czech

    3 Ways to Say Sorry

    Nobody’s perfect, not anywhere in the world. Everybody makes mistakes, and does and says regrettable things. Then it’s time to apologize, as saying ‘I’m sorry’ is not in vain. It can be very healing! Did you know that hearing a sincerely-meant apology can have a noticeable effect on a person’s body? Research has shown that it slows down breathing and heart rate, and even causes a drop in blood pressure.

    Sometimes we cannot fix what’s broken, but we can make the experience a bit easier for anyone who suffered on account of our thoughtless actions or words.

    Here are a number of ways to say sorry in Czech. In any language, just make sure you really mean it! An insincere apology will not go down well with anyone.

    Woman Apologizing

    Promiňte
    I’m sorry

    These words should precede anything else you have to say. Use them sincerely and whenever you are clearly in the wrong. Acknowledging your guilt and apologizing for any wrongdoing will lift your spirits too! Often, remorse can eat away at us, and a simple ‘I’m sorry’, in Czech or any other language, can open the door for forgiveness and resolution of a bad situation. It can be a true gift!

    Chtěl bych se omluvit.
    I would like to apologize.

    This is a slightly more formal way to say ‘I’m sorry’ in Czech. Use this phrase if you’re addressing your superiors and/or elders.

    Upřímně se omlouvám.
    I sincerely apologize.

    If you feel strongly about your apology, this is another slightly more formal phrase to use. Keep it handy for graver errors, or you might come across as insincere!

    Už to znovu neudělám.
    I won’t do it again.

    A promise you can only make if you intend to keep it! Few things feel as bad as having to hear repeated apologies from someone for the same behavior - it means the ‘sorry’ is not sincere. Don’t be that person!

    Slibuji, že příště stejnou chybu neuděláme.
    I’ll make sure not to make this mistake again.

    A beautifully strong phrase! Again, say this only if you mean it - not just in the moment, but always! A bit more formal, this is an especially good phrase to use when apologizing to superiors and/or elders. It will make an especially good impression at the workplace, where accountability is an excellent quality to display!

    To jsem nechtěl.
    I didn’t mean that.

    This is a tricky one… What did you mean, then?! Clear up any confusion with sincerity. Also, use this phrase only if the harm done or mistake made was due to an accident, and then admit to thoughtlessness on your part, if appropriate.

    Je to moje chyba.
    It’s my fault.

    If the fault is really yours, own up to it. You will gain respect in the eyes of others! However, don’t take the blame when it’s not truly yours. It won’t be good for you, and ultimately you will not be respected much for it.

    Omlouvám se za své sobectví.
    I’m sorry for being selfish.

    This is a good phrase to keep handy, especially for your close relationships. It is difficult to admit you’re selfish, isn’t it?! However, it’s good to know when to be honest. We get used to our loved ones, which often means we forget that they need our good manners and unselfish behavior just as much as strangers do.

    Doufám, že mi odpustíte.
    I hope you will forgive me.

    This is a polite and gentle wish that can smooth over many harsh feelings. It also shows that the other person’s opinion and forgiveness are important to you.

    Přebírám za to plnou odpovědnost.
    I take full responsibility.

    This strong statement is similar to admitting that an error or transgression was your fault. It speaks of courage and the willingness to take remedial action. Good one to use…if you mean it!

    Neměl jsem to dělat.
    I shouldn’t have done it.

    This phrase is fine to use if you did or said something wrong. It shows, to an extent, your regret for having done or said what you did, and demonstrates that you understand your role in the mistake.

    Omlouvám se, že jsem vám vrátil pozdě peníze.
    Sorry for giving your money back late.

    It’s rotten to have to loan money! Yet, it’s equally rotten to have to ask for the repayment of a loan. So, do your best not to pay late in the first place, but if it can’t be helped, this would be a good phrase to use!

    Prosím, nezlob se na mě.
    Please don’t be mad at me.

    Well, this is not a very advisable phrase to use if you are clearly in the wrong. If someone is justifiably angry with you, asking them not to be mad at you would be an unfair expectation. However, if you did something wrong by accident, and if the consequences were not too serious, this request would be OK.

    Promiň, mám zpoždění.
    Sorry I’m late.

    Punctuality is valued in most situations, but if you really cannot help being late, then apologize! This way you show respect for your host, and win their approval.

    Omlouvám se, že jsem na vás byla protivná.
    I apologize for being mean to you.

    Acknowledging your own meanness towards someone is no small thing, so good for you! Use this apology only if your intention is to seriously address your mean tendencies, or these words could become meaningless over time.


    2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Czech

    Woman Refusing

    Congratulations! Now you know how to apologize in Czech! After you have apologized for a mistake, focus on fixing whatever you can, and don’t punish yourself over something that cannot be taken back or reversed. That’s healthy for you! Regret can eat away at the soul, and even destroy it. It is ultimately a useless emotion if it consumes you.

    However, in language, we use apologies not only when we’ve transgressed or made mistakes. They come in handy in other situations too, when there has been no wrongdoing. Sometimes we need to express regret for having to refuse a gift, an offer, or an invitation. This can be somewhat tricky. Learn from specialists at CzechClass101 about how to use the correct Czech words for this kind of ‘sorry’!


    3. Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”

    Say Sorry

    On the run and need a quick lesson on how to say sorry in Czech? Don’t fret, just listen and repeat! Click here for a recorded short lesson and learn how to give the perfect apology, with perfect pronunciation in Czech. A little can go a long way, and you will sound like a native!


    4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Czech through CzechClass101

    Man Looking at Computer

    Online learning is here to stay, that’s a fact. In 2015, the Digital Learning Compass Partnership released a report based on surveys to determine online enrollment trends in US institutions for higher education. Thirty percent of all their students learned online! And the number is growing! However, how can you be sure you will not regret your choice of an online language learning school? First, look at the school’s credentials and what it has to offer…

    • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn - what a beautiful cycle! CzechClass101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect to! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Czech!
    • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
    • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Czech with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account - for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Czech dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about CzechClass101…!
    • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters, as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. Your can have your very own Czech teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to - what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
    • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Czech word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Czech level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

    After this lesson, you will know almost every ‘sorry for’ in Czech, but don’t let it be that you’re sorry for missing a great opportunity. Learning a new language can only enrich your life, and could even open doors towards great opportunities! So don’t wonder if you’ll regret enrolling in CzechClass101. It’s the most fun, easy way to learn Czech!

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    Introduce Yourself: How to Say “My Name is,” in Czech and More

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    Introducing yourself in Czech (or any foreign language) might seem daunting at first, we get it. Maybe you googled “how to say my name is in Czech” and now you’re feeling a bit confused. But once you learn a few basic phrases, you’re good to go.

    Czech is a fun, lively language, and you don’t need to be fluent to start a conversation. With this guide, you’ll be ready for any social situation or occasion. In our guide on how to introduce yourself in Czech, we’ve summarized all you need to know and memorize before you put yourself out there—how to say your name, which greeting is appropriate in specific settings, what information is considered too personal, and so on.

    Sit back and put on your glasses. In a few minutes, you’ll be ready to make the best first impression!

    Table of Contents

    1. The Best Start? A Smile and a Greeting!
    2. How to Break the Ice
    3. How CzechClass101.com Helps You Learn Czech in a Fun Way

    Log


    1. The Best Start? A Smile and a Greeting!

    First Encounter

    When you introduce yourself in Czech, there’s one thing you should keep in mind: While in English, you can get away with a simple “hello,” the Czech language isn’t that easy! We like to keep things fresh and exciting (joke!), and use different greetings depending on where we are and whom we’re talking to. Fear not; it’s pretty easy, and with a little bit of practice and effort, you’ll master the art of greeting in no time.

    Let’s say you have a job interview or you’re meeting your friend’s parents. These are the most common greetings for a formal-ish occasion or when meeting older people:

    • Dobrý den (Good day) is the universal phrase you’ll use the most—when entering a store, in the workplace, at the bank, etc. It’s pretty formal and not typically used among friends.
    • Dobrý večer (Good evening). Pretty self-explanatory, right?

    And if you’re with friends or talking to someone your age?

    • Ahoj (Hello). This is the most common casual greeting that you’ll use in a non-formal setting and with friends, anytime of day or night.

    Unlike the first two phrases above, ahoj can be used to say “bye” as well. Beware, though. Some Czechs might be a little uptight or may just prefer to be less personal when first meeting new people, and you might want to stick to the more formal/polite greetings.

    How to Translate: “My name is” in Czech

    Woman with Question Mark in Front of Face

    Now that you’ve greeted everyone, you’re ready to start a fun conversation! And what’s the best way to do that? Tell them your name, of course! Unless you want to be called “Hey, you!” all the time. Then don’t.

    How to say “My name is,” in Czech and formal ways to introduce yourself in Czech:

    • Jmenuji se (I am named) is the more formal (and perhaps complicated) option, suitable for workplaces or interviews. It’s also used in written form.
    • Já jsem (I am) is how Czechs typically introduce themselves in both casual and formal settings.

    Please note that Czech people, especially older folks who aren’t used to foreigners, aren’t very chatty. It’s not usual for them to approach strangers and inquire about their name, age, and favorite food. They often consider it rude and they just don’t want to “pry.” Don’t worry, though. Once the hard shell is cracked, you’ll find that most natives are actually warm and nice people who truly appreciate your effort to speak their language.

    The Niceties

    Being nice is nice, and letting people know you’re pleased to meet them is common while introducing yourself in Czech.

    • Těší mě (I am pleased/Nice to meet you) is a universal phrase that can be used for any occasion while talking to an individual or a group of people.

    Formal vs. Informal Voice: Ty or Vy?

    In the Czech language, there are two forms of the word “you,” and it’s crucial to remember they’re not the same to avoid possible faux pas.

    • The formal tone, vy: This is the second person plural form (instead of the informal second person singular), and is used when meeting older people or meeting people for the first time in general.
    • The informal, ty: This is the second person singular, and is used when talking to your close friends or people who offered tykání, meaning that you can use the informal (and call them by their first name). Using the informal right away might be considered impolite, especially in a professional setting, doctor’s office, or…anywhere, really.

    To put it simply:

    • Your friends, work friends, family, children: Ty.
    • Anyone else (even your age): Vy.
    • When in doubt: Vy.

    If you’re talking to a group of people, you don’t need to worry about formal and informal. You’ll address them by Vy (plural) in any case.

    Handshake, Hug, or a Smooch?

    The answer is simple: A handshake.

    Czechs aren’t very cuddly, and hugging a stranger is never a good idea. There are exceptions, of course—you’re finally meeting your best friend’s sister you’ve heard so much about, or you happen to run into Brad Pitt at the grocery store…

    Group of Friends Hugging

    The same goes for kissing on the cheek. While this is quite common among friends, it’s not usual when meeting new people. On the other hand, if you come from a country where la bise is an everyday routine, just do it. Most people will find it charming.

    Still not sure?

    • A hug or a kiss on the cheek is a very friendly and intimate gesture that’s appropriate in casual settings and among friends and family.
    • A handshake is more formal and polite, and you can’t go wrong with it.

    Let’s Try It!

    Introducing Yourself

    Now you know how to translate “My name is,” in Czech and you’re ready to begin a conversation!
    Let’s start with a formal conversation. You’ll use these phrases at work, at school, and at other semi-formal or formal occasions.

    “Hello, my name is Jana.” Dobrý den, já jsem Jana.
    “Good evening, my name is Jana.” Dobrý večer, já jsem Jana.
    “Nice to meet you.” Těší mě!

    It’s that easy. Now let’s try an informal version.

    “Hi/hello, my name is Jana.” Ahoj, já jsem Jana.
    “Nice to meet you!” Těší mě!


    2. How to Break the Ice

    About Yourself

    After the officialities are done, you and your new acquaintance are ready to get to know each other. The topics of basic conversation in Czech when introducing yourself are probably shockingly similar to what you would talk about in your country: where you’re from, your job, what you’re doing in the Czech Republic.

    If you’re at a bar or a gym, just having fun and making friends, you’ll probably want to talk about your family, pets, and hobbies too.

    What are the most common questions (and answers)? And how do you ask about other people’s names?

    “Hello, my name is Jana.” Ahoj, já jsem Jana.
    “And you?” A ty?
    “Nice to meet you!” Těší mě!

    As for conversations with people who are older or “higher-ranked” than you, you introduce yourself and wait for them to continue. Asking about their name would be considered impolite.

    Now let’s look at how to say “I am from” in Czech:

    Czech Countries

    Informal Formal
    “Where are you from?” Odkud jsi? Odkud jste?
    “I am from Chile.” Jsem z Chile.
    “Where do you live?” Kde bydlíš? Kde bydlíte?
    “I live in Brno.” Bydlím v Brně.
    “Do you like it here?” Líbí se ti tu? Líbí se vám tu?

    It’s up to you how much you want to give away, of course.

    This neat list of introductions and greetings in Czech will make creating a simple outline of your next convo in Czech really easy!

    Work

    Man Who Works as a Baker

    Work is not only a huge part of our everyday life (that also pays the bills), but is also an awesome conversation topic!

    Informal Formal
    What’s your job?” (Where do you work?) Kde pracuješ? Kde pracujete?
    “What do you do?” Co děláš? Co děláte?

    You’ll hear this question a lot. It doesn’t matter if you’re at a family gathering, pub, yoga studio, or on the tram—this is the most common and popular opening line.

    You can answer it in two ways:

    • Pracuju jako asistentka.
      “I work as an assistant.”
    • Jsem asistentka.
      “I am an assistant.”

    The Perfect Ice Breaker: Hobbies and Family!

    Most older Czech people will probably inquire about your marital status, especially if they are elderly ladies. This topic is quite common, although most people won’t go that far and it’s something that likely won’t be discussed during formal occasions.

    People will probably ask:

    Informal Feminine Formal Feminine Informal Masculine Formal Masculine
    “Are you married?” Jsi vdaná? Jste vdaná? Jsi ženatý? Jste ženatý?
    “Do you have kids?” Máš děti? Máte děti? Máš děti? Máte děti?
    “Do you have siblings?” Máš sourozence? Máte sourozence? Máš sourozence? Máte sourozence?
    “What are your hobbies?” Jaké máš koníčky? Jaké máte koníčky? Jaké máš koníčky? Jaké máte koníčky?
    “What kinds of things do you like to do?” Co tě baví? Co vás baví? Co tě baví? Co vás baví?
    “Do you have any pets?” Máš nějaké zvíře? Máte nějaké zvíře? Máš nějaké zvíře? Máte nějaké zvíře?

    To which you might reply:

    Feminine Masculine
    “Yes, I am married.” Ano, jsem vdaná. Ano, jsem ženatý.
    “No, I am not.” Ne, nejsem. Ne, nejsem.
    “I am divorced.” Jsem rozvedená. Jsem rozvedený.
    “I am an only child.” Jsem jedináček. Jsem jedináček.
    “I have a brother and sister.” Mám bratra a sestru. Mám bratra a sestru.

    Getting Too Personal aka TMI

    Like I said before, a random Czech person probably won’t ask personal questions, even the ones that are perfectly normal and fine in other countries.

    In fact, many foreigners are surprised how little people in the Czech Republic “care.” The fact is, they just don’t want to be impolite or nosy, and discussing personal things makes them feel uncomfortable.
    It’s not appropriate to ask or talk about sexual orientation, in particular.

    The most personal question you’ll hear from an average Czech might be:

    • Kolik je ti let?
      “How old are you?”

    Asking about the other person’s age isn’t usual, but it’s not the first topic that will come up when meeting new people.

    The answer is short and sweet; you can just say the number. The proper (and formal) way of stating your age is:

    • Je mi 34 let.
      “I have 34 years.” / “I am 34 years old.”

    When in doubt, stick with neutral, inoffensive topics—work, pets, hobbies, or weather.

    How to Make a Good Impression

    We truly believe you’re a charming person who always leaves the best impression, and we won’t bore you with etiquette.

    Just a few quick tips:

    • Don’t be self-centered.
    • Ask questions, but not too many questions.
    • Make sure you’re using the formal and informal language correctly.
    • Don’t worry too much—every Czech understands that our language isn’t the easiest one. We really appreciate your effort and do our best to guide you, if needed!

    Man and Woman Having Coffee


    How CzechClass101.com Helps You Learn Czech in a Fun Way

    This article is a great guide on how to greet new people and introduce yourself in Czech. All you need to do now is go out and practice! Have fun, make new friends, and see learning Czech as a game.

    You’re probably thinking: “Yeah, this is cool, but how am I supposed to know how to pronounce things? And where can I find more useful words and phrases?”

    Well, my friend, start here. It’s a great summary of how to introduce yourself in Czech, complete with video, vocabulary, grammar, sentences, and phrases.

    Make sure you check out this list of basic Czech phrases that will help you learn the most important words for introducing yourself in Czech. You can also practice the pronunciation here.

    Before you go, though, why not start practicing how to speak and introduce yourself in Czech right away? Leave us a comment with some introductory sentences in Czech; we look forward to hearing from you!

    Good luck! Ahoj!

    Log

    How to Say I Love You in Czech - Romantic Word List

    Do you often feel lonely and sad? Do you long for romance and are willing to do whatever it takes to meet that special person? Speaking another language could revolutionize your love life! So, why wait? Learning how to say ‘love’ in Czech could be just what you need to find it.

    Or perhaps you were lucky, and have found your Czech partner already. Fantastic! Yet, a cross-cultural relationship comes with unique challenges. Learning how to speak your lover’s language will greatly improve your communication and enhance the relationship. At CzechClass101, our team will teach you all the words, quotes and phrases you need to woo your Czech lover with excellence! Our tutors provide personal assistance, with plenty of extra material available to make Czech dating easy for you.

    Table of Contents

    1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date
    2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date
    3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary
    4. Czech Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day
    5. Czech Quotes about Love
    6. Marriage Proposal Lines
    7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines
    8. Will Falling in Love Help You Learn Czech Faster?

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    1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date

    So, you have met your Czech love interest. Congratulations! Who knows where this could take you…?! However, the two of you have just met and you’re not ready to say the Czech word for love just yet. Great, it is better to get to know him/her first. Wow your prospective love by using these Czech date phrases to set up a spectacular first date.

    Czech Date Phrases

    Would you like to go out to dinner with me?

    • Chtěla byste jít se mnou na večeři?

    The important question! In most cultures, this phrase indicates: ‘I’m romantically interested in you’. Flirting in Czech is no different, so don’t take your date to Mcdonald’s!

    Are you free this weekend?

    • Máte tento víkend čas?

    This is a preamble to asking your love interest on a date. If you get an immediate ‘Yes’, that’s good news!

    Would you like to hang out with me?

    • Chtěla byste si se mnou vyjít?

    You like her/him, but you’re not sure if there’s chemistry. Ask them to hang out first to see if a dinner date is next.

    What time shall we meet tomorrow?

    • V kolik hodin se zítra sejdeme?

    Set a time, and be sure to arrive early! Nothing spoils a potential relationship more than a tardy date.

    Where shall we meet?

    • Kde se setkáme?

    You can ask this, but also suggest a place.

    You look great.

    • Vypadáš skvěle.

    A wonderful ice breaker! This phrase will help them relax a bit - they probably took great care to look their best just for you.

    You are so cute.

    • Jsi tak roztomilá.

    If the two of you are getting on really well, this is a fun, flirtatious phrase to use.

    What do you think of this place?

    • Co si myslíte o tomto místě?

    This another good conversation starter. Show off your Czech language skills!

    Can I see you again?

    • Můžu tě znovu vidět?

    So the date went really well - don’t waste time! Make sure you will see each other again.

    Shall we go somewhere else?

    • Půjdeme někam jinam?

    If the place you meet at is not great, you can suggest going elsewhere. It is also a good question to follow the previous one. Variety is the spice of life!

    I know a good place.

    • Znám dobré místo.

    Use this with the previous question. However, don’t say if you don’t know a good place!

    I will drive you home.

    • Odvezu tě domů.

    If your date doesn’t have transport, this is a polite, considerate offer. However, don’t be offended if she/he turns you down on the first date. Especially a woman might not feel comfortable letting you drive her home when the two of you are still basically strangers.

    That was a great evening.

    • To byl skvělý večer.

    This is a good phrase to end the evening with.

    When can I see you again?

    • Kdy tě znova uvidím?

    If he/she replied ‘Yes’ to ‘Can I see you again?’, this is the next important question.

    I’ll call you.

    • Zavolám ti.

    Say this only if you really mean to do it. In many cultures, this could imply that you’re keeping the proverbial backdoor open.

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    2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date

    You learned all the Czech phrases to make a date - congratulations! Now you have to decide where to meet, which can be tricky. Discuss these options with your lover to gauge whether you like the same things. Check out romantic date ideas in Czech below!

    Date Ideas in Czech

    museum

    • muzeum

    If you’re looking for unique date ideas that are fun but won’t break the bank, museums are the perfect spot! You won’t be running out of things to say in the conversations.

    candlelit dinner

    • večeře při svíčkách

    A candlelit dinner is perhaps best to reserve for when the relationship is getting serious. It’s very intimate, and says: “Romance!” It’s a fantastic choice if you’re sure you and your date are in love with each other!

    go to the zoo

    • jít do zoo

    This is a good choice for shy lovers who want to get the conversation going. Just make sure your date likes zoos, as some people dislike them. Maybe not for the first date, but this is also a great choice if your lover has children - you’ll win his/her adoration for inviting them along!

    go for a long walk

    • jít na dlouhou procházku

    Need to talk about serious stuff, or just want to relax with your date? Walking together is soothing, and a habit you can keep up together always! Just make sure it’s a beautiful walk that’s not too strenuous.

    go to the opera

    • jít na operu

    This type of date should only be attempted if both of you love the opera. It can be a special treat, followed by a candlelit dinner!

    go to the aquarium

    • jít do akvária

    Going to the aquarium is another good idea if you need topics for conversation, or if you need to impress your lover’s kids! Make sure your date doesn’t have a problem with aquariums.

    walk on the beach

    • chodit po pláži

    This can be a very romantic stroll, especially at night! The sea is often associated with romance and beauty.

    have a picnic

    • dělat piknik

    If you and your date need to get more comfortable together, this can be a fantastic date. Spending time in nature is soothing and calms the nerves.

    cook a meal together

    • vařit společně jídlo

    If you want to get an idea of your date’s true character in one go, this is an excellent date! You will quickly see if the two of you can work together in a confined space. If it works, it will be fantastic for the relationship and create a sense of intimacy. If not, you will probably part ways!

    have dinner and see a movie

    • jít na večeři a do kina

    This is traditional date choice works perfectly well. Just make sure you and your date like the same kind of movies!

    3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary

    Valentine's Day Words in Czech

    Expressing your feelings honestly is very important in any relationship all year round. Yet, on Valentine’s Day you really want to shine. Impress your lover this Valentine’s with your excellent vocabulary, and make his/her day! We teach you, in fun, effective ways, the meanings of the words and how to pronounce them. You can also copy the characters and learn how to write ‘I love you’ in Czech - think how impressed your date will be!

    4. Czech Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day

    So, you now have the basic Valentine’s Day vocabulary under your belt. Well done! But, do you know how to say ‘I love you’ in Czech yet? Or perhaps you are still only friends. So, do you know how to say ‘I like you’ or ‘I have a crush on you’ in Czech? No? Don’t worry, here are all the love phrases you need to bowl over your Czech love on this special day!

    Valentine's Day Words in Czech

    I love you.

    • Miluji tě.

    Saying ‘I love you’ in Czech carries the same weight as in all languages. Use this only if you’re sure and sincere about your feelings for your partner/friend.

    You mean so much to me.

    • Tolik pro mě znamenáš.

    This is a beautiful expression of gratitude that will enhance any relationship! It makes the receiver feel appreciated and their efforts recognized.

    Will you be my Valentine?

    • Budeš můj Valentýn?

    With these words, you are taking your relationship to the next level! Or, if you have been a couple for a while, it shows that you still feel the romance. So, go for it!

    You’re so beautiful.

    • Jsi tak krásná.

    If you don’t know how to say ‘You’re pretty’ in Czech, this is a good substitute, gentlemen!

    I think of you as more than a friend.

    • Považuji tě za víc než za přítelkyni.

    Say this if you are not yet sure that your romantic feelings are reciprocated. It is also a safe go-to if you’re unsure about the Czech dating culture.

    A hundred hearts would be too few to carry all my love for you.

    • Sto srdcí je málo, aby uneslo všechnu mou lásku k tobě.

    You romantic you…! When your heart overflows with love, this would be the best phrase to use.

    Love is just love. It can never be explained.

    • Láska je láska. To se nedá vysvětlit.

    If you fell in love unexpectedly or inexplicably, this one’s for you.

    You’re so handsome.

    • Jsi tak pěkný.

    Ladies, this phrase lets your Czech love know how much you appreciate his looks! Don’t be shy to use it; men like compliments too.

    I’ve got a crush on you.

    • Zamiloval jsem se do tebe.

    If you like someone, but you’re unsure about starting a relationship, it would be prudent to say this. It simply means that you like someone very, very much and think they’re amazing.

    You make me want to be a better man.

    • Přinutila jsi mě, abych chtěl být lepší.

    Gentlemen, don’t claim this phrase as your own! It hails from the movie ‘As Good as it Gets’, but it is sure to make your Czech girlfriend feel very special. Let her know that she inspires you!

    Let all that you do be done in love.

    • Vše, co děláš, dělej s láskou.

    We hope.

    You are my sunshine, my love.

    • Jsi moje sluníčko.

    A compliment that lets your lover know they bring a special quality to your life. Really nice!

    Words can’t describe my love for you.

    • Mou lásku k tobě nelze vyjádřit slovy.

    Better say this when you’re feeling serious about the relationship! It means that your feelings are very intense.

    We were meant to be together.

    • Byli jsme si souzeni.

    This is a loving affirmation that shows you see a future together, and that you feel a special bond with your partner.

    If you were thinking about someone while reading this, you’re definitely in love.

    • Jestliže jsi na někoho myslel, zatímco jsi to četl, pak jsi určitě zamilovaný.

    Here’s something fun to tease your lover with. And hope he/she was thinking of you!

    5. Czech Quotes about Love

    Czech Love Quotes

    You’re a love champ! You and your Czech lover are getting along fantastically, your dates are awesome, your Valentine’s Day together was spectacular, and you’re very much in love. Good for you! Here are some beautiful phrases of endearment in Czech that will remind him/her who is in your thoughts all the time.

    6. Marriage Proposal Lines

    Czech Marriage Proposal Lines

    Wow. Your Czech lover is indeed the love of your life - congratulations! And may only happiness follow the two of you! In most traditions, the man asks the woman to marry; this is also the Czech custom. Here are a few sincere and romantic lines that will help you to ask your lady-love for her hand in marriage.

    7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines

    Czech Break-Up Lines

    Instead of moving towards marriage or a long-term relationship, you find that the spark is not there for you. That is a pity! But even though breaking up is never easy, continuing a bad or unfulfilling relationship would be even harder. Remember to be kind to the person you are going to say goodbye to; respect and sensitivity cost nothing. Here are some phrases to help you break up gently.

  • We need to talk.
    • Musíme si promluvit.

    This is not really a break-up line, but it is a good conversation opener with a serious tone.

    It’s not you. It’s me.

    • To nejsi ty. To jsem já.

    As long as you mean it, this can be a kind thing to say. It means that there’s nothing wrong with your Czech lover as a person, but that you need something different from a relationship.

    I’m just not ready for this kind of relationship.

    • Jenom prostě nejsem připraven na takový vztah.

    Things moved a bit fast and got too intense, too soon? Painful as it is, honesty is often the best way to break up with somebody.

    Let’s just be friends.

    • Budme jenom kamarádi.

    If the relationship was very intense, and you have sent many ‘i love u’ texts in Czech, this would not be a good breakup line. Feelings need to calm down before you can be friends, if ever. If the relationship has not really developed yet, a friendship would be possible.

    I think we need a break.

    • Myslím si, že potřebujeme pauzu.

    This is again honest, and to the point. No need to play with someone’s emotions by not letting them know how you feel. However, this could imply that you may fall in love with him/her again after a period of time, so use with discretion.

    You deserve better.

    • Zasloužíš si něco lepšího.

    Yes, he/she probably deserves a better relationship if your own feelings have cooled down.

    We should start seeing other people.

    • Měli bychom se začít vídat s ostatními lidmi.

    This is probably the least gentle break-up phrase, so reserve it for a lover that doesn’t get the message!

    I need my space.

    • Potřebuju prostor.

    When a person is too clingy or demanding, this would be an suitable break-up phrase. It is another good go-to for that lover who doesn’t get the message!

    I think we’re moving too fast.

    • Myslím, že se pohybujeme příliš rychle.

    Say this if you want to keep the relationship, but need to slow down its progress a bit. It is also good if you feel things are getting too intense for your liking. However, it is not really a break-up line, so be careful not to mislead.

    I need to focus on my career.

    • Musím se soustředit na svou kariéru.

    If you feel that you will not be able to give 100% in a relationship due to career demands, this is the phrase to use. It’s also good if you are unwilling to give up your career for a relationship.

    I’m not good enough for you.

    • Nejsem pro tebe dost dobrý.

    Say this only if you really believe it, or you’ll end up sounding false. Break-ups are usually hard for the receiving party, so don’t insult him/her with an insincere comment.

    I just don’t love you anymore.

    • Už tě prostě nemiluju.

    This harsh line is sometimes the best one to use if you are struggling to get through to a stubborn, clingy lover who won’t accept your break up. Use it as a last resort. Then switch your phone off and block their emails!

    We’re just not right for each other.

    • Nehodíme se k sobě.

    If this is how you truly feel, you need to say it. Be kind, gentle and polite.

    It’s for the best.

    • Je to pro nejlepší.

    This phrase is called for if circumstances are difficult and the relationship is not progressing well. Love should enhance one’s life, not burden it!

    We’ve grown apart.

    • Vyrostli jsme odděleně od sebe.

    Cross-cultural relationships are often long-distance ones, and it is easy to grow apart over time.

  • 8. Will Falling in Love help you Learn Czech faster?

    Most people will agree that the above statement is a no-brainer - of course it will! Your body will be flooded with feel-good hormones, which are superb motivators for anything. CzechClass101 is one of the best portals to help help make this a reality, so don’t hesitate to enroll now! Let’s quickly look at the reasons why falling in love will speed up your learning of the Czech language.

    Three Reasons Why Having a Lover will Help you Learn Czech Faster!

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    1- Being in a love relationship with your Czech speaking partner will immerse you in the culture
    CzechClass101 uses immersive methods and tools to teach you Czech, but having a relationship with a native speaker will be a very valuable addition to your learning experience! You will gain exposure to their world, realtime and vividly, which will make the language come alive even more for you. The experience is likely to expand your world-view, which should motivate you to learn Czech even faster.

    2- Having your Czech romantic partner will mean more opportunity to practice speaking
    Nothing beats continuous practice when learning a new language. Your partner will probably be very willing to assist you in this, as your enhanced Czech language skills will enhance the relationship. Communication is, after all, one of the most important pillars of a good partnership. Also, you will get to impress your lover with the knowledge gained through your studies - a win/win situation!

    3- A supportive Czech lover is likely to make a gentle, patient teacher and study aid!
    With his/her heart filled with love and goodwill for you, your Czech partner is likely to patiently and gently correct your mistakes when you speak. This goes not only for grammar, but also for accent and meaning. With his/her help, you could sound like a native in no time!

    Three Reasons Why CzechClass101 helps you learn Czech Even Faster when you’re In Love

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    1- All the Resources and Materials Will Help Both of You
    Falling in love with a man or woman speaking Czech is an opportunity for both of you to learn a new language! For this reason, every lesson, transcript, vocabulary list, and resource at CzechClass101 is translated into both English and Czech. So, while your partner can help you learn Czech faster, you can potentially also help him/her learn and master English!

    2- Lessons Are Designed to Help You Understand and Engage with Czech Culture
    At CzechClass101, our focus is to help our students learn practical vocabulary and phrases used by everyday people in Czech Republic. This means that, from your very first lesson, you can apply what you learn immediately! So, when your Czech partner wants to go out to a restaurant, play Pokemon Go, or attend just about any social function, you have the vocabulary and phrases necessary to have a great time!

    3- Access to Special Resources Dedicated to Romantic Czech Phrases
    You now have access to CzechClass101’s specially-developed sections and tools to teach you love words, phrases, and cultural insights to help you find and attract your Czech soul mate. A personal tutor will assist you to master these brilliantly - remember to invite him/her to your wedding!

    5 Steps to the Ultimate Czech Immersion Experience at Home

    Czech Immersion Experience

    Immersion is often hailed as the most efficient and effective way to learn a foreign language. In many ways it’s true. With all the language learning methods out there nothing else comes close to having to think and interact with your environment in the language you’re learning.

    Unfortunately though, most language learners wrongly assume that the only way to experience language immersion is to pack up and move to a foreign country. But not everyone can afford to spend a summer in the Czech Republic just to learn a foreign language.

    Luckily, there are other ways to immerse yourself in Czech. These method are less obvious, but they are effective. In this post we take a look at five steps you can take for the ultimate Czech immersion experience, without quitting your job and catching a plane.

    Digital World

    1) Make your digital world a Czech one

    Technology is an indispensable part of modern life. We interact with phones, computers, tablets, and other electronic devices throughout the day. Why not take these interactions and use them to practice your Czech? Most devices give you the option of switching the language of the operating system. Switching your phone or laptop interface to Czech won’t make you fluent, but it will help you engage with the language in a very practical way.

    Another way to make your digital life a Czech one is to check which sites you use on a daily basis, and use them in Czech also. A great example of this is the Czech version of Google. This version of the Google will allow you to search in Czech and is more likely to give results in the language as well.

    You can use popular social networks like Facebook in Czech. You can even go to Czech news sites for your fill of global news. You do like podcasts? Trying listening to a couple Czech podcasts too.

    Conversation

    2) Write out a speech or conversation in Czech

    A surefire way to increase your ability in a foreign language is to write out a mock conversation or speech in that language. Pretend you have to give a speech on one of your favorite topics (it could be anything from sports, hobbies, or even your favorite movie genre).

    Now take some time to write a out your fictitious speech. Inevitably you will hit some roadblocks as you encounter words you know in your native English, but don’t know in Czech. When you get stuck, research the words you don’t know (you can look them up or perhaps ask a language partner or tutor). This is a highly effective and practical way to increase your vocabulary, and it will help you practice thinking in the Czech language.

    Writing a long connected train of thoughts exposes the gaps and weaknesses in your Czech. Once you know what these are, you are free to practice them and use them to continue on with your Czech speech.

    This is also a great way to learn new worlds in the context of your entire speech. I always say, “content is king when you’re learning a language”, and it’s true. Learning words in the context of other words and sentences helps you surmise what new words mean. It also helps you get comfortable with how these words are practically used. Not to mention context helps you remember and recall new information more easily.

    3) Practice with native Czech speakers

    There are a lot of great learning resources out for anyone learning Czech. However nothing quite comes close to practicing the language with a real person. If you live in or around a large metropolitan area there’s a chance that there are some Czech speakers nearby.

    Check and see if your area has any local language exchanges or language speaking groups. You’re likely to find a native Czech speaker there. If not a native you might be able to find someone who knows Czech as a second language. If you can’t make a connection locally you can search online. Just as there are language exchanges in the real world, there also online ones (most of which are free).

    4) Connect with other Czech learners

    Native speakers aren’t the only Czech speakers who can aid you on your language learning journey. Practicing with other Czech learners is also helpful. Don’t worry if you practice with someone who has a higher or lower level in the language than you.

    If you’re the more advanced learner you can learn a lot by teaching someone else. As you help someone else understand difficult words or grammatical concepts you’ll find that you start to better understand them yourself.

    If your learning partner has a higher level in Czech, they can be the one to help you overcome the hurdles you encounter as a beginner. After all what better way to to learn Czech than from someone who, as a language learner, has been in your shoes?

    Self Reward

    5) Reward yourself in Czech

    At the end of a busy day we all love a little relaxation and me-time. One of the most enjoyable and effective ways to develop your language skills is to kick back and enjoy the language while doing leisure activities.

    Whether it’s listening to music, watching a movie or tv show, reading a book, or even enjoying a good online video binge, even spending just an extra thirty minutes a day doing something you love in the Czech language can yield some serious long term results.

    If you’re a beginner start which more basic content. You might have to start out listening to simple songs or even watching children’s shows. After awhile though you’ll be able to dive into the meatier and more engaging stuff as your proficiency increases.

    Learning a foreign language doesn’t mean you have to spend your days straining over grammar rules or textbooks. Any way that you can take your learning off the page and make it more enjoyable will help you learn faster.

    Final thoughts

    Immersion is powerful way to learn a foreign language, and now more than ever the immersion experience isn’t limited to just world travelers.

    With a little creativity, the right resources, and the internet you can experience the Czech language without ever having to leave your hometown!

    How to Celebrate April Fools’ Day in Czech

    How to Celebrate April Fools' Day in Czech!

    Most everyone is familiar with this day, as it is celebrated nearly everywhere the world. Yet, when exactly is April Fools’ Day? And where did April Fools come from? April Fools’ Day is observed on April 1st every year. This day of jokes and pranks is believed to have stemmed from the 16th-century calendar change in France, when New Year’s Day was moved from April 1 to January 1. This action was taken due to the adoption of the Gregorian calendar.

    However, a few people were resistant to the calendar change, so they continued to observe New Year’s Day on April 1st, rather than the new date. They were referred to as the “April Fools”, and others started playing mocking tricks on them. This custom endured, and is practiced to this day around the world!

    Table of Contents

    1. Top One Million Words You Need to Know for April Fools’ Day
    2. Czech Phrases You Can Use on April Fools’ Day
    3. Some of the Coolest April Fools’ Pranks To Play on Anybody
    4. How Can CzechClass101 Make Your April Fools’ Day Special?
    5. Top 1000 Most Useful Phrases in Czech - Testing New Technology

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    1. Top One Million Words You Need to Know for April Fools’ Day

    Do you want to know how to say April Fools’ Day in Czech? Well, there are millions of ways and words, but here are the top one million Czech words you really need to know! Simply click this link. Here are some of them you will find useful:

    1. joke - vtipkovat
    2. funny - vtipný
    3. lie - lhát
    4. sneaky - záludný
    5. prankster - šprýmař
    6. prank - žert
    7. play a joke - dělat si legraci
    8. humor - humor
    9. fool - blázen
    10. deceptive - klamný
    11. April 1st - apríl
    12. surprise - překvapení

    2. Czech Phrases You Can Use on April Fools’ Day

    Czech Phrases for April Fools' Day

    Don’t limit yourself to practical jokes - use these April Fools’ phrases in Czech to prank your favorite Czech friend or colleague!

    1. I learned Czech in 1 month.
      • Česky jsem se naučil za měsíc.
    2. All classes for today got canceled.
      • Vyučování bylo pro dnešek zrušeno.
    3. I’m sorry, but I’ve just broken your favorite pair of glasses.
      • Moc mě to mrzí, ale právě jsem ti zlomil tvé oblíbené brýle.
    4. Someone has just hit your car.
      • Někdo ti právě narazil do auta.
    5. I’m getting married.
      • Budu se vdávat.
    6. You won a free ticket.
      • Vyhrál jsi volný lístek.
    7. I saw your car being towed.
      • Viděl jsem, jak odtáhli váše auto.
    8. They’re giving away free gift cards in front of the building.
      • Před budovou rozdávají zdarma dárkové poukazy.
    9. A handsome guy is waiting for you outside.
      • Venku na tebe čeká nějaký hezký pán.
    10. A beautiful lady asked me to give this phone number to you.
      • Nějaká pěkná paní mě požádala, abych ti předal tohle číslo.
    11. Can you come downstairs? I have something special for you.
      • Nemůžeš přijít dolů? Mám pro tebe něco speciálního.
    12. Thank you for your love letter this morning. I never could have guessed your feelings.
      • Děkuju za tvůj milostný dopis dnes ráno. Nikdy by mě nenapadlo, jak se cítíš.

    Choose your victims carefully, though; the idea is to get them to laugh with you, not to hurt their feelings or humiliate them in front of others. Be extra careful if you choose to play a prank on your boss - you don’t want to antagonize them with an inappropriate joke.

    3. Some of the Coolest April Fools’ Pranks To Play on Anybody

    Choose Bad or Good

    Right, now that you know the top million April Fools’ words in Czech, let’s look at some super pranks and tricks to play on friends, colleagues and family. Some April Fools ideas never grow old, while new ones are born every year.

    Never joke in such a way that it hurts anyone, or humiliates them badly in front of others - the idea is for everybody to laugh and enjoy the fun! Respect is still key, no matter what day of the year it is.

    Cockroach prank

    1- Infestation

    This trick is so simple, yet so creepy, it’s almost unbelievable. Take black paper, cut out the silhouette of a giant cockroach, a spider or another insect, and stick it inside the lampshade of a table lamp. When the lamp is switched on, it will look like a monstrous insect is sitting inside the lampshade. Or, get a whole lot of realistic-looking plastic insects, and spread them over a colleague’s desk and chair, or, at home, over the kids’ beds etc. Creep-factor: stellar.

    2- Which One Doesn’t Fit?

    Put the photo of a celebrity or a notorious politician in a frame, and take it to work on April Fools’ Day. Hang the photo on the staff picture wall, and wait. You’ll be surprised how long it can take for people to notice that one picture doesn’t fit.

    3- Something Weird in the Restroom

    At work, replace the air freshener in the restroom with something noxious like insect killer, oven cleaner or your own odious mixture in a spray bottle. Be sure to cover the bottle’s body so no one suspects a swap.

    Or paint a bar of soap with clear nail polish, and leave it at the hand wash basin. It will not lather.

    Or, if your workplace’s restroom has partitioned toilets with short doors, arrange jeans or trousers and shoes on all but one of the toilet covers, so it looks like every stall is occupied. Now wait for complaints, and see how long it takes for someone to figure out the April Fools’ Day prank. You’ll probably wish you had a camera inside the restroom. But, unless you don’t mind getting fired, don’t put your own recording device in there!

    Funny Face

    4- Call Me Funny

    Prepare and print out a few posters with the following instructions: Lion Roar Challenge! Call this number - 123-456-7890 - and leave your best lion’s roar as voicemail! Best roarer will be announced April 10 in the cafeteria. Prize: $100. (Lion’s roar is just an example; you can use any animal call, or even a movie character’s unique sound, such as Chewbacca from Star Wars. The weirder, the funnier. Obviously!) Put the posters up in the office where most of the staff is likely to see them. Now wait for the owner of the number to visit you with murderous intent. Have a conciliatory gift ready that’s not a prank.

    5- Minty Cookies

    This is another simple but hugely effective prank - simply separate iced cookies, scrape off the icing, and replace it with toothpaste. Serve during lunch or tea break at work, or put in your family’s lunch boxes. Be sure to take photos of your victim’s faces when they first bite into your April Fools’ cookies.

    6- Wild Shopping

    At your local grocer, place a realistic-looking plastic snake or spider among the fresh vegetables. Now wait around the corner for the first yell.

    7- The Oldest Trick in the Book

    Don’t forget probably the oldest, yet very effective April Fools’ joke in the book - smearing hand cream or Vaseline on a door handle that most staff, family or friends are likely to use. Yuck to the max!

    8- Sneeze On Me

    Another golden oldie is also gross, yet harmless and utterly satisfying as a prank. Fill a small spray bottle that you can easily conceal with water. Walk past a friend, colleague or one of your kids, and fake a sneeze while simultaneously spraying them with a bit of water. Expect to be called a totally disgusting person. Add a drop of lovely smelling essential oil to the water for extra confusion.

    9- Word Play Repairs

    Put a fresh leek in the hand wash basin at home or work, and then tell your housemates or colleagues this: “There’s a huge leak in the restroom/bathroom basin, it’s really serious. Please can someone go have a look?!” Expect exasperation and smiles all around. Note that this prank is only likely to work where people understand English well.

    10- Scary Face

    Print out a very scary face on an A4 sheet of paper, and place it in a colleague’s, or one of your kid’s drawers, so it’s the first thing they see when they open the drawer. You may not be very popular for a while.

    11- Wake Up To Madness

    Put foamy shaving cream, or real whipped cream on your hand, and wake your kid up by tickling their nose with it. As long as they get the joke, this could be a wonderful and fun way to start April Fools’ Day.

    Computer Prank

    12- Computer Prank

    This one’s fabulous, if you have a bit of time to fiddle with a colleague, friend or your kid’s computer. It is most effective on a computer where most of the icons they use are on the desktop background itself (as opposed to on the bottom task bar).

    Take and save a screenshot of their desktop with the icons. Set this screenshot as their background image. Now delete all the working icons. When they return to their computer, wait for the curses when no amount of clicking on the icons works.

    13- Monster Under the Cup

    This one will also work well anywhere people meet. Take a paper cup, and write the following on it in black pen: “Danger! Don’t lift, big spider underneath.” Place it upside-down on prominent flat surface, such as a kitchen counter, a colleague’s desk or a restaurant table. Expect some truly interesting responses.

    Door Prank

    14- Prank Door

    Write in large letters on a large and noticeable piece of paper: PUSH. Tape this notice on a door that should be pulled to open, and watch the hilarious struggle of those clever souls who actually read signs.

    4. How Can CzechClass101 Make Your April Fools’ Day Special?

    If you happen to visit Czech Republic, or if you work for any Czech company, knowing the above Czech prankster phrases can really lighten up your day. Showing you have a sense of humor can go a long way to cement good relationships in any situation. These phrases are at your disposal for free, as well as are these 100 core Czech words, which you will learn how to pronounce perfectly.

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    Also, don’t stop at learning April Fools’ phrases in Czech - bone up your Czech language skills with these FREE key phrases. Yes, CzechClass101 doesn’t joke when it comes to effective, fun and easy learning.

    Now, as a bonus, test our super-learning technology, and learn the Top 1000 most useful phrases in Czech below! But that’s not all. Read on to learn how you can be eligible for large enrollment discounts at CzechClass101.

    5. Top 1000 Most Useful Phrases in Czech - testing new technology

    Help us by being a language guinea pig! Listen to this video above with embedded cutting-edge, frequency-based learning technology that enables you to learn large amounts of data in record time.

    • Note: This technology is in beta-phase of development, and we invite your input for fine-tuning.
    • To participate: Watch the video for instructions, and leave a comment to rate it. Your comment will make you eligible for large enrollment-fee discounts. To watch the video, please click the play button.

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    How to Say Happy New Year in Czech & New Year Wishes

    Learn all the Czech New Year wishes online, in your own time, on any device! Join CzechClass101 for a special Czech New Year celebration!

    How to Say Happy New Year in Czech

    Can you relate to the year passing something like this: “January, February, March - December!”? Many people do! Quantum physics teaches us that time is relative, and few experiences illustrate this principle as perfectly as when we reach the end of a year. To most of us, it feels like the old one has passed in the blink of an eye, while the new year lies ahead like a very long journey! However, New Year is also a time to celebrate beginnings, and to say goodbye to what has passed. This is true in every culture, no matter when New Year is celebrated.

    So, how do you say Happy New Year in Czech? Let a native teach you! At CzechClass101, you will learn how to correctly greet your friends over New Year, and wish them well with these Czech New Year wishes!

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    Table of Contents

    1. How to Celebrate New Year in Czech Republic
    2. Must-Know Czech Words & Phrases for the New Year!
    3. Top 10 New Year’s Resolutions in Czech
    4. Inspirational New Year Quotes
    5. Inspirational Language Learning Quotes
    6. How To Say Happy New Year in 31 Languages
    7. How CzechClass101 Can Help You Learn Czech

    But let’s start with some vocabulary for Czech New Year celebrations, very handy for conversations.

    1. How to Celebrate New Year in Czech Republic

    Just like in all European countries, the New Year in the Czech Republic is among the most eventful celebrations of the year. It is also called Silvester, after St. Silvester, whose feast is on the last day of the year, December 31.

    Do you know what a New Year’s resolution is and why Czechs keep making them?

    If you don’t already know, you’ll find out a bit later, so keep reading!

    New Year celebrations begin in the afternoon or evening of the previous day, on New Year’s Eve. While it can also be celebrated with the family, typical celebrations include a wide circle of friends and acquaintances. A good tradition is for people to gather in the squares of towns and villages before midnight, with everybody counting down the last seconds of the old year and celebrating the arrival of the new one with the thunderous opening of champagne bottles and the setting off of rockets, firecrackers, and fireworks.

    The celebrations are inseparable from heavy alcohol consumption, which significantly contributes to the exuberant atmosphere. There is also food; typically there are all kinds of sandwiches, canapes, and other delicatessen products. The sipping is crowned by the New Year’s toast at midnight when the old year ends and the new year begins. At that moment, people wish each other a Happy New Year and send out emails and SMS greetings. New Year’s celebrations usually last until the morning hours.

    A: stop smoking, start working out, and lose weight. Not everyone can stick with it. However, it ==does not matter. There is another new year coming and with it another opportunity for a resolution.

    The main motto of the New Year’s day is saying, as on New Year, so throughout the rest of the year, meaning that the way we will spend the first day of the new year will be the way we spend the entire year.

    And now, the answer to the earlier question.

    Do you know what a New Year’s resolution is and why Czechs keep making them?

    The New Year’s resolution is the promise that the Czechs usually make on New Year’s day. It’s a commitment to do something positive in your life.

    Happy New Year!

    Šťastný Nový Rok!

    2. Must-Know Czech Words & Phrases for the New Year!

    Czech Words & Phrases for the New Year

    1- Year

    rok

    This is pretty self-explanatory. Most countries follow a Gregorian calendar, which has approximately 365 days in a year, while in some cultures, other year designations are also honored. Therefore, New Year’s day in Czech Republic could fall on a different day than in your country. When do you celebrate New Year?

    2- Midnight

    půlnoc

    The point in time when a day ends and a new one starts. Many New Year celebrants prefer to stay awake till midnight, and greet the new annum as it breaks with fanfare and fireworks!

    3- New Year’s Day

    Nový Rok

    In most countries, the new year is celebrated for one whole day. On the Gregorian calendar, this falls on January 1st. On this day, different cultures engage in festive activities, like parties, parades, big meals with families and many more.

    You can do it!

    4- Party

    párty

    A party is most people’s favorite way to end the old year, and charge festively into the new one! We celebrate all we accomplished in the old year, and joyfully anticipate what lies ahead.

    5- Dancing

    tanec

    Usually, when the clock strikes midnight and the New Year officially begins, people break out in dance! It is a jolly way to express a celebratory mood with good expectations for the year ahead. Also, perhaps, that the old year with its problems has finally passed! Dance parties are also a popular way to spend New Year’s Eve in many places.

    6- Champagne

    šampaňské

    Originating in France, champagne is a bubbly, alcoholic drink that is often used to toast something or someone during celebrations.

    7- Fireworks

    ohňostroj

    These are explosives that cause spectacular effects when ignited. They are popular for announcing the start of the new year with loud noises and colorful displays! In some countries, fireworks are set off to scare away evil spirits. In others, the use of fireworks is forbidden in urban areas due to their harmful effect on pets. Most animals’ hearing is much more sensitive than humans’, so this noisy display can be very frightful and traumatising to them.

    Happy Near Year!

    8- Countdown

    odpočítávání

    This countdown refers to New Year celebrants counting the seconds, usually backward, till midnight, when New Year starts - a great group activity that doesn’t scare animals, and involves a lot of joyful shouting when the clock strikes midnight!

    9- New Year’s Holiday

    Novoroční dovolená

    In many countries, New Year’s Day is a public holiday - to recuperate from the party the previous night, perhaps! Families also like to meet on this day to enjoy a meal and spend time together.

    10- Confetti

    konfeta

    In most Western countries, confetti is traditionally associated with weddings, but often it is used as a party decoration. Some prefer to throw it in the air at the strike of midnight on New Year’s Eve.

    11- New Year’s Eve

    Silvestr

    This is the evening before New Year breaks at midnight! Often, friends and family meet for a party or meal the evening before, sometimes engaging in year-end rituals. How are you planning to give your New Year greetings in 2018?

    12- Toast

    přípitek

    A toast is a type of group-salutation that involves raising your glass to drink with others in honor of something or someone. A toast to the new year is definitely in order!

    13- Resolution

    předsevzetí

    Those goals or intentions you hope to, but seldom keep in the new year! Many people consider the start of a new year to be the opportune time for making changes or plans. Resolutions are those intentions to change, or the plans. It’s best to keep your resolutions realistic so as not to disappoint yourself!

    14- Parade

    průvod

    New Year celebrations are a huge deal in some countries! Parades are held in the streets, often to celebratory music, with colorful costumes and lots of dancing. Parades are like marches, only less formal and way more fun. At CzechClass101, you can engage in forums with natives who can tell you what Czech New Year celebrations are like!

    3. Top 10 New Year’s Resolutions

    New Year’s Resolutions List

    So, you learned the Czech word for ‘resolution’. Fabulous! Resolutions are those goals and intentions that we hope to manifest in the year that lies ahead. The beginning of a new year serves as a good marker in time to formalise these. Some like to do it in writing, others only hold these resolutions in their hearts. Here are our Top 10 New Year’s resolutions at CzechClass101 - what are yours?

    Learn these phrases and impress your Czech friends with your vocabulary.

    New Year's Resolutions

    1- Read more

    Přečtěte si více.

    Reading is a fantastic skill that everyone can benefit from. You’re a business person? Apparently, successful business men and women read up to 60 books a year. This probably excludes fiction, so better scan your library or Amazon for the top business reads if you plan to follow in the footsteps of the successful! Otherwise, why not make it your resolution to read more Czech in the new year? You will be surprised by how much this will improve your Czech language skills!

    2- Spend more time with family

    Trávit více času s rodinou.

    Former US President George Bush’s wife, Barbara Bush, was quoted as having said this: “At the end of your life, you will never regret not having passed one more test, not winning one more verdict, or not closing one more deal. You will regret time not spent with a husband, a friend, a child, a parent.” This is very true! Relationships are often what gives life meaning, so this is a worthy resolution for any year.

    3- Lose weight

    Zhubnou

    Hands up, how many of you made this new year’s resolution last year too…?! This is a notoriously difficult goal to keep, as it takes a lot of self discipline not to eat unhealthily. Good luck with this one, and avoid unhealthy fad diets!

    4- Save money

    Šetřete peníze.

    Another common and difficult resolution! However, no one has ever been sorry when they saved towards reaching a goal. Make it your resolution to save money to upgrade your subscription to CzechClass101’s Premium PLUS option in the new year - it will be money well spent!

    5- Quit smoking

    Přestat kouřit.

    This is a resolution that you should definitely keep, or your body could punish you severely later! Smoking is a harmful habit with many hazardous effects on your health. Do everything in your power to make this resolution come true in the new year, as your health is your most precious asset.

    6- Learn something new

    Naučit se něco nového.

    Science has proven that learning new skills can help keep brain diseases such as dementia and Alzheimer’s at bay! It can even slow down the progression of the disease. So, keep your brain healthy by learning to speak a new language, studying towards a qualification, learning how to sew, or how to play chess - no matter how old you are, the possibilities are infinite!

    7- Drink less

    Pijte méně.

    This is another health resolution that is good to heed any time of the year. Excessive drinking is associated with many diseases, and its effect can be very detrimental to good relationships too. Alcohol is a poison and harmful for the body in large quantities!

    8- Exercise regularly

    Pravidelně cvičit.

    This resolution goes hand-in-hand with ‘Lose weight’! An inactive body is an unhealthy and often overweight one, so give this resolution priority in the new year.

    9- Eat healthy

    Jíst zdravě.

    If you stick with this resolution, you will lose weight and feel better in general. It is a very worthy goal to have!

    10- Study Czech with CzechClass101

    studovat češtinu s CzechClass101.com

    Of course! You can only benefit from learning Czech, especially with us! Learning how to speak Czech can keep your brain healthy, it can widen your circle of friends, and improve your chances to land a dream job anywhere in the world. CzechClass101 makes it easy and enjoyable for you to stick to this resolution.

    4. Inspirational New Year Quotes

    Inspirational Quotes

    Everyone knows that it is sometimes very hard to stick to resolutions, and not only over New Year. The reasons for this vary from person to person, but all of us need inspiration every now and then! A good way to remain motivated is to keep inspirational quotes near as reminders that it’s up to us to reach our goals.

    Click here for quotes that will also work well in a card for a special Czech new year greeting!

    Make decorative notes of these in Czech, and keep them close! Perhaps you could stick them above your bathroom mirror, or on your study’s wall. This way you not only get to read Czech incidentally, but also remain inspired to reach your goals! Imagine feeling like giving up on a goal, but reading this quote when you go to the bathroom: “It does not matter how slowly you go, as long as you do not stop.” What a positive affirmation!

    5. Inspirational Language Learning Quotes

    Language Learning Quotes

    Still undecided whether you should enroll with CzechClass101 to learn a new language? There’s no time like the present to decide! Let the following Language Learning Quotes inspire you with their wisdom.

    Click here to read the most inspirational Language Learning Quotes!

    As legendary President Nelson Mandela once said: “If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his own language, that goes to his heart.” So, learning how to say Happy New Year in Czech could well be a way into someone special’s heart for you! Let this year be the one where you to learn how to say Happy New Year, and much more, in Czech - it could open many and unexpected doors for you.

    6. How To Say Happy New Year in 31 Languages

    Here’s a lovely bonus for you! Why stop with Czech - learn how to say Happy New Year in 31 other languages too! Watch this video and learn how to pronounce these New Year’s wishes like a native in under two minutes.

    7. Why Enrolling with CzechClass101 Would Be the Perfect New Year’s Gift to Yourself!

    If you are unsure how to celebrate the New Year, why not give yourself a huge gift, and enroll to learn Czech! With more than 12 years of experience behind us, we know that CzechClass101 would be the perfect fit for you. There are so many reasons for this!

    Learning Paths

    • Custom-tailored Learning Paths: Start learning Czech at the level that you are. We have numerous Learning Pathways, and we tailor them just for you based on your goals and interests! What a boon!
    • Marked Progress and Fresh Learning Material Every Week: We make new lessons available every week, with an option to track your progress. Topics are culturally appropriate and useful, such as “Learning how to deliver negative answers politely to a business partner.” Our aim is to equip you with Czech that makes sense!
    • Multiple Learning Tools: Learn in fun, easy ways with resources such 1,000+ video and audio lessons, flashcards, detailed PDF downloads, and mobile apps suitable for multiple devices!
    • Fast Track Learning Option: If you’re serious about fast-tracking your learning, Premium Plus would be the perfect way to go! Enjoy perks such as personalised lessons with ongoing guidance from your own, native-speaking teacher, and one-on-one learning on your mobile app! You will not be alone in your learning. Weekly assignments with non-stop feedback, answers and corrections will ensure speedy progress.
    • Fun and Easy: Keeping the lessons fun and easy-to-learn is our aim, so you will stay motivated by your progress!

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    There’s no reason not to go big in 2018 by learning Czech with CzechClass101. Just imagine how the world can open up for you!

    How To Say ‘Thank you’ in Czech

    How to Say Thank You in Czech

    In most cultures, it is custom to express gratitude in some way or another. The dictionary defines gratitude as follows: it is “the quality of being thankful; readiness to show appreciation for and to return kindness”. Giving a sincere, thankful response to someone’s actions or words is often the ‘glue’ that keeps relationships together. This is true in most societies! Doing so in a foreign country also shows your respect and appreciation for the culture. Words have great power - use these ones sincerely and often!

    Table of Contents

    1. 12 Ways to say ‘Thank you’ in Czech
    2. Video Lesson: Learn to Say ‘Thank You’ in 3 Minutes
    3. Infographic & Audio Lesson: Survival Phrases - Thank You
    4. Video Lesson: ‘Thank You’ in 31 Languages
    5. How CzechClass101 Can Help You

    So, how do you say ‘Thank you’ in Czech? You can learn easily! Below, CzechClass101 brings you perfect translations and pronunciation as you learn the most common ways Czech speakers say ‘Thanks’ in various situations.

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    1. 12 Ways to say ‘Thank you’ in Czech

    1- Thank you.

    Děkuji vám.

    The magical words that can bring a smile to any face. For one day, truly mean it whenever you say these words, and see how this lifts your spirit too!

    2- That’s very kind of you.

    To je od vás velmi laskavé.

    This phrase is appropriate when someone clearly goes out of their way to give good service, or to offer you a kindness.

    3- Thanks for your kind words!

    Díky za vaše milá slova!

    Someone paid you a compliment and made you feel good? That is kind of him/her, so express your gratitude!

    4- Thank you for coming today.

    Děkuji, že jste dnes přišli.

    This welcoming phrase should be part of your arsenal if you’re conducting more formal meetings with Czech speakers. If you’re hosting a party, this is also a good phrase when you greet your Czech guests!

    5- Thank you for your consideration.

    Děkuji, že to vezmete v potaz.

    This is a more formal, almost solemn way to thank someone for their thoughtfulness and sensitivity towards you. It is also suitable to use when a native speaker has to consider something you submit, like a job application, a project or a proposal. You are thanking them, in essence, for time and effort they are about to, or have spent on your submission.

    6- Thanks a lot!

    Díky moc!

    This means the same as ‘Thank you’, but with energy and enthusiasm added! It means almost the same as ‘thank you so much’ in Czech. Use this in an informal setting with your Czech friends or teachers.

    7- Teachers like you are not easy to find.

    Není snadné najít učitele jako ty.

    Some phrases are compliments, which express gratitude by inference. This is one of them. If you’re particularly impressed with your CzechClass101 teacher, this is an excellent phrase to memorize!

    8- Thank you for spending time with us.

    Děkujeme vám za čas, který jste s námi strávil.

    Any host at a gathering with Czech speakers, such as a meeting or a party, should have this under his/her belt! Use it when you’re saying goodbye or busy closing a meeting. It could also be another lovely way to thank your Czech language teacher for her time.

    9- Thank you for being patient and helping me improve.

    Děkuji za to, že jste se mnou měla trpělivost a pomohla mi se zlepšit.

    This phrase is another sure way to melt any formal or informal Czech teacher’s heart! Teaching is not easy, and often a lot of patience is required from the teacher. Thank him/her for it! It’s also a good phrase to use if you work in Czech Republic, and want to thank your trainer or employer. You will go a long way towards making yourself a popular employee - gratitude is the most attractive trait in any person!

    10- You’re the best teacher ever!

    Jste ten nejlepší učitel!

    This is also an enthusiastic way to thank your teacher by means of a compliment. It could just make their day!

    11- Thank you for the gift.

    Děkuji za dárek.

    This is a good phrase to remember when you’re the lucky recipient of a gift. Show your respect and gratitude with these words.

    12- I have learned so much thanks to you.

    Díky Vám jsem se tolik naučil.

    What a wonderful compliment to give a good teacher! It means they have succeeded in their goal, and you’re thankful for it.

    2. Video Lesson: Learn to Say ‘Thank You’ in 3 Minutes

    Wherever your destination maybe, manners are a must! And in this respect, Czech Republic is no different.

    1- Děkuji.
    In Czech, the most simple way of saying “Thank you” is: Děkuji. Děkuji is a verb, and the dictionary form is děkovat which in English will be translated as “to thank.” So literally translated, the word děkuji means “(I) thank.”

    2- Díky
    Another simple and common way of saying “Thank you” is the word Díky. It is a bit similar to the English “thanks.”

    3- Moc děkuji
    There will be occasions when you will want to express your gratitude in a more polite and appreciable manner. When that happens, you should use the expression Moc děkuji. The first word moc means “a lot” or “much,” so the English equivalent for Moc děkuji is “Thank (you) a lot” but the word order is opposite. You can also say Děkuji moc and the meaning will stay the same.

    4- Velmi vám děkuji
    To show deeper gratitude, especially to a specific person, you can say Velmi vám děkuji which in English will be translated as “Thank you very much.” The word Velmi literally means “very” and vám is translated as “(to) you.”

    5- Děkuju
    In the Czech Republic, you will probably also hear the word Děkuju many times every day. Děkuju has basically the same meaning as děkuji. Děkuju is officially not a correct expression, but it is a kind of accent change. And anyway, people use děkuju very often, especially in daily casual conversation.

    6- Díky moc
    Here is another expression for showing gratitude using the word díky just by replacing děkuji in the expression děkuji moc. And we get: Díky moc. It means something like “thanks a lot.” Here the position of the word moc is also not strictly fixed. You can say either díky moc or moc díky.

    Cultural Insights

    Quick tip 1
    The most common way to say “Thank you” is děkuji. Use děkuji in any situation, whether formal, informal, special or common, Czechs will appreciate your efforts to speak their language. Also, never worry about the person’s age or profession. Keep in mind that this word can be used anywhere, anytime and with anyone. You say děkuji when the waiter brings you the food, when somebody does a favor for you, and when you receive a compliment.

    Quick tip 2
    You will be surprised to see how much the word díky is used in Czech. People use díky freely in daily conversation. You can say it when talking with your friends or other people in a casual way, but you should avoid using díky in a business conversation or in a very formal situation. If you are not sure which expression to use, just say děkuji, and you will never make a mistake.

    Quick tip 3
    Use Moc děkuji and Velmi vám děkuji when you feel very pleased and thankful. Adding moc and velmi vám will make the politeness level a bit higher, and will show how impressed you are.

    On the run to Czech Republic? Wait! You can’t go without some basic language phrases under your belt! Especially if you’re heading to meet your prospective employer! Either in person or online, knowing how to say ‘Thank you’ in the Czech language will only improve their impression of you! CzechClass101 saves you time with this short lesson that nevertheless packs a punch. Learn to say ‘Thank you’ in Czech in no time!

    3. Audio Lesson: Survival Phrases - Thank You

    5 Ways to Say Thank You in Czech

    Perhaps you think it’s unimportant that you don’t know what ‘Thank you’ is in Czech, or that it’s too difficult a language to learn. Yet, as a traveler or visitor, you will be surprised at how far you can go using a little bit of Czech in Czech Republic!

    Click Here to Listen to the Free Audio Lesson!

    At CzechClass101, we offer you a few ways of saying ‘Thank you’ in Czech that you have no excuse not knowing, as they’re so simple and easy to learn. The lesson is geared to aid your ‘survival’ in formal and informal situations in Czech Republic, so don’t wait! You will never have to google ‘How do you say thanks in Czech’ again…!

    4. ‘Thank You’ in 31 Languages

    For the global traveler in a hurry, here are 31 ways to say ‘Thank you’! These are the first words you need to learn in any foreign language - it is sure to smooth your way with native speakers by showing your gratitude for services rendered, and your respect for their culture! Learn and know how to correctly say ‘Thank you’ in 31 different languages in this short video.

    5. Why would CzechClass101 be the perfect choice to learn Czech?

    However, you need not stop at ‘Thank you’ in Czech - why not learn to speak the language?! You have absolutely nothing to lose. Research has shown that learning a new language increases intelligence and combats brain-aging. Also, the ability to communicate with native speakers in their own language is an instant way to make friends and win respect! Or imagine you know how to write ‘Thank you’ to that special Czech friend after a date…he/she will be so impressed!

    Thank You

    CzechClass101 Has Special Lessons, Tools and Resources to Teach You How to Say Thank You and Other Key Phrases

    With more than a decade of experience behind us, we have taught thousands of satisfied users to speak foreign languages. How do we do this? First, we take the pain out of learning! At CzechClass101, students are assisted as they master vocabulary, pronunciation, and conversation through state-of-the-art and fun online learning methods. A library replete with learning resources allows for you to learn at your own pace and in your own space! Resources include thousands of video and audio recordings, downloadable PDF lessons and plenty of learning apps for your mobile devices. Each month, we add benefits with FREE bonuses and gifts to improve your experience.

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    We accommodate all levels and types of learners, from Absolute Beginner to Advanced, and CzechClass101 is free for anyone to sign up. However, you can choose to fast track your fluency with lesson customization and increased interactive learning and practicing. Upgrade to Premium, or Premium PLUS to enhance your experience and greatly expedite your learning. With this type of assistance, and pleasurable effort on your part, you will speak Czech in a very short period of time!

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    Best of all is that you’re never alone! We believe that practice is the holy grail of learning any new language, and we gear our courses to ensure lots of it. Enroll with us, and you gain immediate access to our lively forum where we meet and greet, and discuss your burning questions. Our certified teachers are friendly and helpful, and you are very likely to practice your first ‘Thanks!’ in Czech on him/her, AND mean it! Hurry up, and sign up now - you will thank us for it.

    How to Start Thinking in Czech

    Learn 4 tools and techniques to stop translating in your head and start thinking in Czech

    Going through Czech lessons is enough to get by and learn the basics of Czech, but to truly become fluent you need to be able to think in Czech. This will allow you to have conversations with ease, read smoothly, and comprehensively understand natives. To do this, you need to go beyond just completing daily or weekly lessons.

    We naturally translate in our heads because it’s viewed as the easiest way to learn the definitions needed when learning a language. This way of learning can actually hinder your skills and fluency later on. If your brain has to make neural connections between the word you’re learning, what it means in your native tongue, and the physical object the connection will not be nearly as strong. When you bypass the original translation between Czech and your native language then there is a more basic and strong connection between just the Czech vocabulary word and the tangible object.

    start thinking in Czech

    In this blog post, you will learn the 4 important techniques to easily and naturally begin to speculate about the daily occurrences in your life. The best part is all of these techniques are supported and can be achieved through CzechClass101.com.

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    1. Surround yourself with Czech

    Surround Yourself

    By surrounding yourself with Czech constantly you will completely immerse yourself in the language. Without realizing it you’ll be learning pronunciation, sentence structures, grammar, and new vocabulary. You can play music in the background while you’re cooking or have a Czech radio station on while you study. Immersion is a key factor with this learning process because it is one of the easiest things to do, but very effective. Even if you are not giving the program your full attention you will be learning.

    One great feature of CzechClass101.com is the endless podcasts that are available to you. You can even download and listen to them on the go. These podcasts are interesting and are perfect for the intention of immersion, they are easy to listen to as background noise and are interesting enough to give your full attention. Many of them contain stories that you follow as you go through the lessons which push you to keep going.

    2. Learn through observation
    learn through observation

    Learning through observation is the most natural way to learn. Observation is how we all learned our native languages as infants and it’s a wonder why we stop learning this way. If you have patience and learn through observation then Czech words will have their own meanings rather than meanings in reference to your native language. Ideally, you should skip the bilingual dictionary and just buy a dictionary in Czech.

    CzechClass101.com also offers the materials to learn this way. We have numerous video lessons which present situational usage of each word or phrase instead of just a direct translation. This holds true for many of our videos and how we teach Czech.

    3. Speak out loud to yourself
    talk to yourself

    Speaking to yourself in Czech not only gets you in the mindset of Czech, but also makes you listen to how you speak. It forces you to correct any errors with pronunciation and makes it easy to spot grammar mistakes. When you speak out loud talk about what you did that day and what you plan to do the next day. Your goal is to be the most comfortable speaking out loud and to easily create sentences. Once you feel comfortable talking to yourself start consciously thinking in your head about your daily activities and what is going on around you throughout the day.

    With CzechClass101.com you start speaking right away, not only this, but they have you repeat words and conversations after a native Czech speaker. This makes your pronunciation very accurate! With this help, you are on the fast path to making clear and complex sentences and then actively thinking about your day.

    4. Practice daily

    If you don’t practice daily then your progress will be greatly slowed. Many people are tempted to take the 20-30 minutes they should be practicing a day and practice 120 in one day and skip the other days. This isn’t nearly as effective because everyday you practice you are reinforcing the skills and knowledge you have learned. If you practice all in one day you don’t retain the information because the brain can realistically only focus for 30 minutes at most. If you’re studying for 120 minutes on the same subject little of the information will be absorbed. Studying everyday allows you to review material that you went over previous days and absorb a small amount of information at a time.

    It’s tough to find motivation to study everyday, but CzechClass101.com can help. It’s easy to stay motivated with CzechClass101.com because we give you a set learning path, with this path we show how much progress you’ve made. This makes you stick to your goals and keep going!

    Conclusion

    Following the steps and having patience is the hardest part to achieving your goals, it’s not easy learning a new language. You are essentially teaching your brain to categorize the world in a completely new way. Stick with it and you can do it just remember the 4 tools I taught you today! With them, conversations, reading, and understanding will become much easier. The most important thing to remember is to use the tools that CzechClass101.com provides and you will be on your way to being fluent!

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