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Archive for the 'Tips & Techniques' Category

You Better Mean Business: Czech Business Phrases

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We all know life isn’t just work; relationships matter and love conquers all.

However, your career is one of the most important parts of your life (and it also takes up a big chunk of your time on Earth). 

That’s why it’s beneficial to find a career that fulfills you and makes you feel accomplished…or at least pays well and doesn’t kill you on the inside. And, of course, you might want or need to start a career in another country.

If you want to get a job or start your own business in the Czech Republic (yay!), you should work on learning some common Czech business phrases and vocabulary. Every successful entrepreneur will tell you that your language gives away a lot about your personality and approach, and by choosing the right words, you will open more prospects. Doing this in a foreign language may be a little more challenging, but also more fun. Trust me. Been there, done that.

Multilingualism benefits your business/professional skills, and makes you look more invested, motivated, and appealing to your business partners. And can you guess what one of the pillars of strong business/work relationships is? Speaking the local language! It bridges cultural gaps and supports interpersonal relationships. 

In other words: Knowing at least a little business Czech will make you look more attractive and less culturally distant to your future boss or business partners. 

Get your game face on. I’ll walk you through some Czech business phrases that will help you boost or start your career in our lovely Central European country. I’ve also included some vocab and tips for email or phone communication, as well as phrases you’ll need to arrange your Czech business travels.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Business Words and Phrases in Czech Table of Contents
  1. How to Nail a Job Interview
  2. How to Make Friends at Work
  3. How to Sound Smart in a Meeting
  4. How to Handle Business Calls and Emails
  5. How to Have a Successful Business Trip
  6. How CzechClass101.com Helps You Learn Czech in a Fun Way

1. How to Nail a Job Interview

Job Interview

First things first: First impressions are more important than we like to admit. Start with the basics and make sure you know how to introduce yourself in Czech appropriately.

Learning how to say “Hello, my name is…” in Czech will take just a few moments. But in context of the bigger picture, it will change the way your potential boss sees you: as an invested, proactive individual who is willing to work on his/her skills, truly wants to be a part of the team, and is ready to learn new things on the go.

A- The Right Start

Remember that you should be formal and polite. Don’t get too personal, and keep things “clean” and professional (unless your potential employer or business partner shows up wearing ripped jeans and offers you a beer).

What could be your opening lines?

  • Dobrý den, já jsem Ironman. Mám tu pracovní pohovor s paní Gosling.
    “Good day, my name is Ironman. I have a job interview with Mrs. Gosling here.”
  • Dobrý den, jdu za paní Gosling. 
    “Good day, I am here to see Mrs. Gosling.”

Check out our quick guide on Czech greetings. It’s crucial that you be prepared, so that you don’t have to think about your language skills too much, and can focus on the interview.

B- Greetings & Goodbyes

Here are the essentials you need to remember to get by:

    Dobrý den. (“Good day.”) – formal, can be used throughout the day
    Dobré ráno. (“Good morning.”)
    Rád/ráda vás poznávám. (“Nice to meet you.”)
    Nashledanou. (“Goodbye.”)
    Těšilo mě. (“It was a pleasure to meet you.”)
    Ozveme se. (“We’ll keep in touch.”)

This guide on how to say hello in Czech will come in handy, too!

    ➢ When in doubt, stick with Dobrý den and Nashledanou.

C- Ty or Vy? (A.K.A. Using Formal Speech)

The Czech language has two distinct pronouns for “you”: vy (formal) and ty (casual). 

When in doubt, always opt for the formal version vy, especially in business or work settings. However, if someone offers you tykání, which is the use of the informal voice, you can follow suit.

Sometimes tykání is referred to as a first-name basis, but this isn’t entirely correct. In Czech, you can call a person by their first name and still use the formal voice.

    Formal voice: Second person plural, even when you’re talking to a single person.

Rule of thumb:

  • When in doubt: Vy.
  • Your friends, work friends, family, or children: Ty.
  • Anyone else (even if they’re your age): Vy.

It’s very likely that people in creative (more relaxed) environments will offer tykání right away. Just follow the lead!

D- During the Interview

You’ll be asked about your education, accomplishments, strengths, weaknesses, goals, and visions.

Here are some of the words you’ll likely use during your interview (masculine / feminine):

  • Pilný / Pilná (“Diligent”)
  • Kreativní (“Creative”)
  • Ambiciózní (“Ambitious”)
  • Nadšený / Nadšená (“Enthusiastic”)
  • Spolehlivý / Spolehlivá (“Reliable”)
  • Pohodový / Pohodová (“Easy-going”)

You might want to check out this list of adjectives to prepare for your self-introduction in Czech. Write down a few lines about who you are and what you can offer the company.

This list of workplace-related vocabulary will help you put together and recognize some (pretty obvious) questions and answers. Below, you’ll find a list of useful business Czech phrases that you’ll either use or hear from your interviewer:

You:

  • Rád bych se zeptal… / Ráda bych se zeptala… (“I would like to ask…”)
  • Na podobné pozici jsem pracoval/pracovala tři roky. (“I had a similar job for three years.”)
  • V tomto oboru mám mnoho zkušeností. (“I have vast experience in this area.”)
  • Nevadí mi práce přesčas. (“I don’t mind working overtime.”)
  • Jaký je plat? (“How much is the salary?”)
  • Je možný home-office? (“Can I work from home?”)
  • Jaká je pracovní doba? (“What are the working hours?”)
  • Děkuji za váš čas. (“Thank you for your time.”)
  • Chcete se mě na něco zeptat? (“Do you want to ask me any questions?”)

Interviewer:

  • Jaký máte titul? (“What degrees do you have?”)
  • Jaké máte vzdělání? (“What is your educational background?”)
  • Kde jste pracoval/pracovala předtím? (“Where did you work before?”)
  • Na jaké pozici jste pracoval/pracovala? (“What was your role?”)

E- Skills

If you have it, flaunt it!

  • Mluvím anglicky, německy a česky. (“I speak English, German, and Czech.”)
  • Mluvím plynule španělsky. (“I am fluent in Spanish.”)
  • Jsem začátečník. (“I am a beginner.”)
  • Vystudoval/vystudovala jsem… (“I have a degree in…”)
  • Inženýr (Master’s degree in engineering or economics)
  • Magistr (Master’s degree in social studies or art)

(Feel free to learn more about the education structure in the Czech Republic.)

If you need more time to think of an answer:

  • Můžete to zopakovat? (“Could you repeat that, please?”)
  • Pardon, neslyšel/neslyšela jsem vás. (“Sorry, I didn’t hear that.”)
  • Pardon, nerozumím. (“Sorry, I don’t understand.”)

2. How to Make Friends at Work

First of all, bring three batches of homemade triple chocolate cookies…just joking.

Officemates

Vítej! (“Welcome!”)

Making friends at work is important. In fact, studies show that people who have a “best friend” at work are seven times as likely to be engaged in their job! They also have “higher levels of productivity, retention, and job satisfaction than those who don’t.”

Icebreakers

First of all, you need to introduce yourself, right?

We have a great article for ya!

TLDR?

Okay, here’s a snapshot.

  • Smile
  • Jmenuju se… (“My name is….”)
  • Těší mě. (“Nice to meet you.”)

After that, you can get a little more touchy-feely:

  • Jsem tu nový/nová. (“I am new here.”)
  • Moc se mi tu líbí. (“I like it here a lot.”)
  • Chodíte někdy na skleničku? (“Do you go out for drinks?”)
  • Jak dlouho tu pracuješ? (“How long have you been working here?”)
  • Líbí se ti tu? (“Do you like it here?”)
  • Pomůžeš mi, prosím? (“Can you help me, please?”)
  • Děkuji za pomoc! (“Thank you for your help!”)

Want more? See our list of more self-introduction lines!

Business Phrases

3. How to Sound Smart in a Meeting

Yeah, most meetings could have just been emails, but if you do have to see your coworkers or boss or business partners face-to-face, you’re going to want to show off.

No slacking allowed, get ready. 

Business Meeting

Schůzka s kolegy (“Meeting with coworkers”)

Whom you’re meeting with (masculine / feminine):

  • Kolega / Kolegyně (“Colleague,” “Coworker”)
  • Obchodní partner / partnerka (“Business partner”)
  • Investor / Investorka (“Investor”)
  • Šéf / Šéfka (“Boss”)
  • Nadřízený / Nadřízená (“Supervisor”)

Speak up:

  • Podle mého názoru… (“In my opinion…”)
  • Já si myslím… (“I think…”)
  • Dobrá práce. (“Good work.”)
  • Skvělá práce! (“Excellent work!”)
  • Pojďme to probrat. (“Let’s talk about it.”)

This is the ultimate business talk guide. Listen to the vocabulary, practice your pronunciation, and impress with your smooth Czech for business.

4. How to Handle Business Calls and Emails

I have always perceived business calls and emails as a foolproof way to “read” the people on the other end.

Work emails with typos, grammar mistakes (!!!), or sketchy vocab are off-putting and unprofessional.

You really need to pay attention to your spelling and make sure everything is perfect (thank god for online translators—use them!).

The structure should be like this:

  1. Dobrý den, paní Grangerová. (“Good day, Mrs. Granger.”)
  2. Píšu vám kvůli tématu, o kterém jsme spolu mluvili. (“I am writing to you in regards to the topics we talked about.”)
  3. The body of the email.
  4. Pokud budete potřebovat další pomoc, neváhejte se na mě obrátit. (“If you need any additional assistance, please contact me.”)
  5. Děkuji předem. (“Thank you in advance.”)
  6. S pozdravem, (“Regards,”)
  7. Your name.

Other stuff:

  • Děkuji za odpověď. (“Thank you for your reply.”)
  • Mohl/mohla byste mi prosím poslat… (“Would you please send me…”)
  • Můžete mi doporučit…? (“Could you recommend…?”)
  • Pečlivě jsme zvážili váš návrh a… (“We carefully considered your proposal and…”)

Easy peasy.

Of course, you don’t need to be super-official like that when you’re asking your coworkers where you’re going for lunch.

As for calls, well… Do people still do that?

Okay, in case you do need to make a phone call:

When answering the phone, people usually say Prosím (“Please”) or say their name right away, which might catch you off-guard.

A Woman Answering the Phone

Dal/dala bych si salámovou, prosím. (“I’d like pepperoni pizza, please.”)

During the call, you might find these lines useful:

  • Dobrý den, to je design studio Pilot? (“Hello, is it Pilot design studio?”)
  • To je paní Thurman? (“Is it Mrs. Thurman?”)
  • Chci mluvit s paní Thurman, prosím. (“I’d like to talk to Mrs. Thurman, please.”)
  • Prosím přepojte mě do účtárny. (“Please connect me to the finance department.”)

If you’re on the other side of the phone:

  • Nezavěšujte. (“Hold the line.”)
  • Předám… (“I will put you through to…”)
  • Chcete nechat vzkaz? (“Would you like to leave a message?”)
  • Můžete zavolat později? (“Could you call back later?”)
  • Děkuji, nashledanou. (“Thank you, goodbye.”)

Here’s a list of more super-useful phrases for your next phone call.

5. How to Have a Successful Business Trip

Yay or nay? Do you like to travel for work?

Anyway!

Unless you have an assistant, you’ll probably need to book a hotel and tickets, share an itinerary with your coworkers or business partners, get a cab, check in to a hotel…lots of talking to be done! 

Here are some useful phrases to help you out on your business trip to the Czech Republic

  • Jede z letiště do města autobus? (“Is there a bus from the airport to the city?”)
  • Mám rezervaci. (“I have a reservation.”)
  • Máte nějaké volné pokoje? (“Do you have any vacancies tonight?”)
  • Berete kreditní karty? (“Do you take credit card?”)
  • Je Wi-Fi zdarma? (“Is the Wi-Fi free?”)
  • Mohl bych dostat účet? (“Could I have the check?”)
  • Přistaneme v 17:00. (“We land at five p.m.”)
  • Odlétáme v 7:00. (“We take off at seven a.m.”)
  • Vyzvedněte mě na letišti, prosím. (“Pick me up at the airport, please.”)

Plus:

  • Děkuji za pohostinnost. (“Thank you for your hospitality.”)
  • Děkuji za váš čas. (“Thank you for your time.”)
  • Budu tam včas. (“I will be there on time.”)
  • Můj let má zpoždění. (“My flight is delayed.”)

This list of vocabulary will help you prepare for almost any travel situation!

Traveller

Šťastnou cestu! (“Safe travels!”)

6. How CzechClass101.com Helps You Learn Czech in a Fun Way

CzechClass101.com makes learning Czech easy, exciting, and fun. With us, it’s not about endless memorizing or thick textbooks. Learn Czech with us and make progress faster than you could imagine!

What can you find here?

Sign up now, it’s free!

One last thing: Let us know in the comments if this article helped you. Are there any more phrases you need to learn? Let’s get in touch!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Business Words and Phrases in Czech

Learn Czech: YouTube Channels to Boost Your Language Skills

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What’s the number-one thing that will make learning Czech entertaining, help you boost your vocabulary, keep you company, and always be there for you? YouTube! When you learn Czech, YouTube videos in or about the language will be immensely helpful to you.

Here’s a little background story to show you the power of YouTube: 

When I first discovered this marvelous world of videos (back in 2007 or so), I decided I had to speak English well enough to understand what was going on in makeup tutorials (this was WAY before influencers were a real thing, guys!).

Lo and behold, here I am. Don’t underestimate the power of social media and technology. Thanks to specialized channels, you can learn to speak Czech with YouTube.

If you’re busy, juggling work/love/whatever, or just, you know, living your life, you want to be efficient. Do you have time to sit down for an hour and repeat new vocabulary?

Probably not.

Here enters YouTube.

YouTube videos are great background noise, and I promise, even if you don’t think you’re paying much attention, you do register what you’re hearing. You’d be surprised how big of a difference a mere fifteen minutes a day will make. Besides, it’s fun. Just put on a video, cook dinner, do your nails, clean the bathroom…and learn Czech with YouTube!

I highly recommend that you put your game face on at least a couple times a week and watch a pro educational video on the CzechClass101 YouTube channel. These girls know how to explain the quirks of Czech grammar, their pronunciation is angelic, and they make learning Czech so much easier for you!

Now, let me show you the best YouTube channels for learning the Czech language.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Czech Table of Contents
  1. Kovy
  2. Dewii
  3. Radiožurnál
  4. DVTV
  5. Bonton Kids
  6. TadyGavin
  7. Dream Prague
  8. Veselé učení nejen pro děti/Fun Learning Not Just for Kids
  9. Jitka Nováčková
  10. CzechClass101
  11. How to Make the Most of YouTube Videos
  12. How CzechClass101.com Helps You Learn Czech in a Fun Way

1. Kovy

Category: Entertainment, current affairs, traveling, vlogs, parodies

Level: Advanced

Features: Contemporary vocabulary, good pronunciation, great for younger audiences

Kovy is the latest phenomenon, and everybody and their mom loves him. This is the right content for you if you’re in the mood for something light-hearted. The vocab is pretty advanced, but we’re working on getting out of our comfort zone, right? 

How To Survive in NYC with $1/day is a great example of his work.

2. Dewii

Category: Zero waste, veganism, minimalism, yoga, routines, best of (product recommendation), vlogs

Level: Intermediate – Advanced

Features: Contemporary vocabulary, good pronunciation, great for younger audiences, contemporary topics

Compared to Kovy’s channel, Dewii’s is less “trendy” and “funny,” and more slow-paced—maybe even “grown-up.” It’s all about zero waste, climate change, vegan food, and minimalism. She’s a lovely, bubbly girl, and her Czech isn’t overly complicated (vocabulary-wise).

Also, her vegan recipes are delicious and easy to make! 

Her channel is a great combo of education and lifestyle. 

3. Radiožurnál

Category: News, interviews, current affairs

Level: Intermediate – Advanced

Features: Great for vocabulary building, slow-paced, professional pronunciation

This Czech YouTube channel features interviews and podcasts. It’s great for building (and challenging) your vocabulary, as the speech is slow-paced and precise with professional pronunciation. Yay! You’ll learn about the latest affairs, Czech culture, and sports, all while sharpening your language skills.

Short on time? If you download their app, you can listen to radio plays from various contemporary or classical authors (Maupassant, etc.) on the go!

Man Watching Movie on His Tablet

Watch and learn.

4. DVTV

Category: News, interviews 

Level: Intermediate – Advanced

Features: Great for vocabulary building, slow-paced, professional pronunciation, educational (science, politics, culture), some interviews are in English with Czech subtitles

DVTV is my personal favorite, and you’ll love it if you want to learn more than just the Czech language. DVTV is a streaming news channel that specializes in interviews with recognized professionals in various fields. They have won numerous awards and their content is truly interesting, slightly edgy, and informative.

Are you interested in health? Gastronomy? Politics? I promise you won’t be bored, especially if you appreciate professional journalism.

Some of their interviews are in English with Czech subtitles.

Man Holding His Phone while Listening to His Earphone

Listen and learn wherever you are.

5. Bonton Kids

Category: Cartoons for kids 

Level: Intermediate – Advanced

Features: Great for vocabulary building, very simple and easy to understand

Everybody loves cartoons, and believe it or not, they can actually help you learn Czech. I don’t have much to say about this channel, except: Enjoy!

Cartoons are perfect for lazy weekend mornings or… say… days when you can’t leave the house for various reasons.

Besides, who doesn’t feel like a little kid sometimes?

There are movies and cartoons on this channel, so you’ll never get bored watching. This is a great option if you’re looking for relatively easy Czech YouTube channels to pass the time.

Donald Duck

“Cartoon” – Kreslená pohádka.

6. TadyGavin

Category: An American who is learning Czech 

Level: Beginner – Intermediate

Features: Great for building vocabulary, beginner-friendly, great learning tips

Gavin is an American who’s been studying Czech since 2016. His videos are cute and super-informative. He knows all about the struggles and joys you’re likely experiencing yourself, and can help you navigate through the labyrinth of Czech language grammar. To start, check out his video How to Learn Czech, Hacks and Resources or watch him eat Czech candy for the first time.

7. Dream Prague

Category: An American living in the Czech Republic

Level: Beginner – Intermediate

Features: In Czech with English subtitles / English with Czech subtitles

Jen is an American girl who has been living in Prague for eight years. She has one of the best Czech YouTube channels for learning fun facts, surprising Czech stuff, and general fun. If you’re interested in how Americans see the Czech culture and traditions, or want to learn more about the country, you’re going to love her channel. Check out her 5 Fun Facts about Czech Culture (that are also illegal).

Already want more? Find out why she moved to Prague and things you didn’t know were Czech!

8. Veselé učení nejen pro děti/Fun Learning Not Just for Kids

Category: Educational channel for children

Level: Beginner

Features: Basic vocabulary, professional pronunciation, basics, well-explained, graphic

Guys, seriously. I know this sounds ridiculous, but when you’re learning another language, you want everything to be very simple, well-explained, and graphic. Guess what these videos are? Very simple, well-explained, and graphic. This alphabet video is a great example of how the videos are structured. 

Sure, you might need a shot of tequila after watching a couple of those, but I promise it’ll be worth it!

A Woman Listening to Her Headphone Using Her Laptop

“Headphones” – Sluchátka.

9. Jitka Nováčková

Category: Lifestyle, vlogs, makeup, viral challenges

Level: Beginner – Intermediate

Features: Simple vocabulary

Jitka is a gorgeous Czech model who married a Danish soccer player. Her videos and vlogs cover life in Denmark, traveling, life in another country, and some fun beauty-related stuff. 

The content is great for broadening your vocab, it’s fun to look at, and it’s not overly complicated. Check out her backstage vlogs, challenges, and beauty tips

10. CzechClass101

Category: Education

Level: All

Features: Vocabulary, grammar, podcasts, listening exercises

Last, but not least: CzechClass101 is every Czech student’s dream and the best place to learn the Czech language on YouTube. Learn basic and not-so-basic vocabulary, discover info about Czech holidays, work on your listening skills (beginner, intermediate, advanced) and reading skills (absolute beginner, beginner, intermediate).

For those of you who are always busy, there are Czech in 3 Minutes videos that will help you learn the basics: numbers in Czech, how to introduce yourself, apologies, and much more.

Why is it awesome?

1. Our videos are made by professionals, so the structure and content is highly effective and helpful for all learners.
2. It’s available 24/7.
3. It’s free.
4. You can listen and learn from anywhere.
5. You can pause and rewind anytime without interrupting other students in your class.
6. You can focus on strengthening or polishing a specific skill (like reading or listening).

What’s not to love?

11. How to Make the Most of YouTube Videos

Okay, now we’ve introduced you to some of the best Czech YouTubers and other Czech language channels. But this new knowledge won’t do you much good unless you know how to make the most of your watching time. Here are our tips:

  • Pay attention to whatever you’re watching. 
  • Write down words you’ve just learned or have trouble remembering.
  • Focus on vocabulary. Set a goal and stick to it. Fifteen new words a day is totally realistic and will bring you to almost 5500 words in just one year! That means going from absolute beginner to intermediate in just twelve months.
  • Find a topic you like—makeup, traveling, cooking, or even try to pick up a new hobby—whatever strikes your fancy! The more interested you are, the faster and easier you’ll learn.
  • Comment and interact with other followers.
  • Be consistent. Remember: What you treat like a hobby, stays a hobby.
  • Set milestones. How does going from absolute beginner to intermediate in one year sound? And you know what? It’s totally doable!

12. How CzechClass101.com Helps You Learn Czech in a Fun Way

CzechClass101.com will make learning Czech easy, exciting, and fun. With us, it’s not about endless memorizing or thick textbooks. Learn Czech with us and make progress faster than you could imagine!

What can you find here?

Sign up now, it’s free!

One last thing: Let us know in the comments if this article helped you. Also feel free to let us know what your favorite Czech YouTube channels are, and how you use them to learn Czech faster. Let’s get in touch!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Czech

How Hard is it to Learn Czech?

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Let’s debunk this myth about Slavic languages being incredibly hard and almost impossible for English-speakers to learn.

Oh, please. 

How hard is it to learn Czech? Not at all. Sure, there’s going to be a lot of new things—things that seemingly make no sense, things you’ll hate, and things that will make your tongue twist. However, Czech isn’t that hard, complicated, or nasty. It’s just different from English.

Learning another language is always an exciting process. Yup, it’s hard at the beginning (beginnings are hard whether you’re learning Czech, training for your first half-marathon, or learning how to produce an edible dinner without setting your kitchen on fire). But once you turn the corner, things get easier and you start to make progress faster.

The trickiest part of Czech is probably a tie between the pronunciation and the declension. But with practice, effort, and determination, it’s nothing you can’t master.

We’ve got your back, buddy! Now. Sit back and let me convince you that Czech is just as easy as any language you already speak.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Learning Czech Table of Contents
  1. Things That Will Require Some Effort: Sometimes Life Gets Hard…
  2. The Good News: The Easy Aspects of Learning Czech
  3. I Can’t Wait to Start Learning Czech! What Should I Do First?
  4. Tips!
  5. How CzechClass101.com Helps You Learn Czech in a Fun Way

1. Things That Will Require Some Effort: Sometimes Life Gets Hard…

…and so does the wonderful Czech language.

Why is Czech hard to learn, and what sucks the most?

A- Declension

There are seven cases in the Czech language:

1. Nominative

2. Genitive

3. Dative

4. Accusative

5. Vocative

6. Locative

7. Instrumental

  • That means there’s a whopping fourteen versions of each noun, adjective, pronoun, and numeral (singular + plural).
  • You need to know the gender of the word (masculine, feminine, neuter) in order to do the declension.
  • Each case changes the ending of the word and the preposition.

Yes, you need to memorize all of them. There’s no shortcut.

No, I’m not kidding.

    ➢ Thankfully, someone very nice and smart created fourteen paradigms of noun declension. Once you memorize the declension of these paradigms and learn to distinguish between words of different grammatical genders, the rest will be a smooth ride.

MasculineFeminineNeuter
Pán (“Mister”)Žena (“Woman”)Město (“City”)
Hrad (“Castle”)Růže (“Rose”)Moře (“Sea”)
Muž (“Man”)Píseň (“Song”)Kuře (“Chicken”)
Stroj (“Machine”)Kost (“Bone”)Stavení (“Cottage”)
Předseda (“Chairman”)
Soudce (“Judge”)
Jiří (“George”)

    ➢ Learn the genders: even though “-a” being at the end of a word is a pretty reliable indicator that the word is declined as žena, it can also be declined as předseda, resulting in completely different endings and meanings.
    ➢ The same goes for adjective declension. These babies are just as easy, and vary depending on the gender of the noun they’re related to.
    ➢ And…pronouns. Pronoun declension is a teeny bit more complicated because some of them are irregular. Teehee.

Check out this amazing article that will make the declension easy for ya.

A Girl Writing on Her Notebook

Be consistent; study every day.

B- Conjugation

Czech conjugation is the way a verb changes to show number, gender, person, and mood

  • There are four verb classes (that means four different verb endings).
  • There are six persons:, ty, on/ona/ono, my, vy, oni/ony/ona (“I, you, he/she/it, we, you, they”).
  • The verb form usually depends on the number of persons and the gender.

Conjugation is a pretty simple and straightforward process. 

Do you speak German, Spanish, Italian, or Latin? Great! Thanks to similar rules, Czech conjugation will be a piece of cake for you!

Watch for the ending of each word.

-at, -át singular + plural (Example: dát “to give”)-ovat, -ít, -ýt singular + plural (Example: kupovat “to buy”) 
1. Dám
2. Dáš
3.
4. Dáme
5. Dáte
6. Dají
1. Kupuji
2. Kupuješ
3. Kupuje
4. Kupujeme
5. Kupujete
6. Kupují
-it, -et, -ět singular + plural (Example: sedět “to sit”)-out, -ci singular + plural  (Example: zapomenout “to forget”)
1. Sedím
2. Sedíš
3. Sedí
4. Sedíme
5. Sedíte
6. Sedí
1. Zapomenu
2. Zapomeneš
3. Zapomene
4. Zapomeneme
5. Zapomenete
6. Zapomenou

Of course, there are a few irregular verbs that you’ll have to memorize and learn how to conjugate from scratch. This lesson is awesome for an avid Czech student! 

A Woman Studying on Her Laptop

There are things you will have to memorize.

C- Formal and Informal Speech

Formal and informal speech What can I say? I don’t understand this quirk either. It’s pretty useless and frustrating, but oh well.

    Formal speech (second person plural, vy) is used in a formal setting, with older people, with people you’ve just met, at work, etc.

    Informal speech (second person singular, ty) is used with family and friends, and in informal settings.

Formal:
Jste krásná. (“You are beautiful.”)

Informal:
Jsi krásná. (“You are beautiful.”)

Cute, isn’t it?

D- Pronunciation

Czech is a phonetic language, and as such, it’s pronounced the same way it’s written (just like Latin or Spanish, for example).

But the Czech language has a little surprise for you: additional letters with diacritics (marks above the letter). These can be a háček (“hook”), čárka (“length mark”), or kroužek (“circle”), and they change the pronunciation of the letter.

Make sure you know and practice the pronunciation of each Czech consonant and vowel.

Remember:

    Final consonants in the Czech language are fully pronounced, including the letter “h,” which is most often silent in English. 

    Voiced consonants (b, v, g, ď, z, ž, h) at the end of the word are silent.

    Ch is a single letter in the Czech alphabet, pronounced through the throat (like “mojito,” for example).

    The soft consonants ď, ť, ň and di, ti, ni don’t exist in English. To pronounce them correctly, try to put the tip of your tongue further back against your soft palate and pronounce the regular “d,” but much, much softer.

This article will help you deal with some of the hardest Czech words to pronounce, and show you how to correct any mistakes you’re making!

2. The Good News: The Easy Aspects of Learning Czech

1. Czech conjugation is somewhat similar to that of certain Latin-based languages (Spanish, Portuguese, French, Italian, and Romanian).

2. Czech vocabulary is made of subsets of word roots, prefixes, and suffixes linked together in easy-to-remember and logical ways. Many Czech words are combos of prefix + root. For example: Při-nést (“to bring”) / od-nést (“to take away”) / za-nést (“to take something somewhere”).

3. Declension changes only the end of the word, most often the last vowel. Other changes follow consistent and straightforward rules.

4. Czech is a phonetic language, pronounced the same way it’s written. This is similar to the pronunciation in Spanish, Italian, and Latin (and totally different from English pronunciation).

5. There are only three tenses in the Czech language: past, present, and future! How awesome is that!

6. Word order is way looser and easier than in English. It’s flexible, allowing you to put emphasis on different parts of the sentence. The typical Czech word order is subject-verb-object. To ask questions, it’s verb-subject-object. For example: Je těžké naučit se česky? (“Is Czech hard to learn?) / Není těžké naučit se česky. (“Czech isn’t hard to learn.”)

You can do this!

A Woman Carrying Book on Her head

Czech is fun and quite easy to learn!

3. I Can’t Wait to Start Learning Czech! What Should I Do First?

First of all, congrats! Yay!

Now let’s get to work.

1. Set a goal for yourself. This could be “I’m going to be able to order food and ask where the park is in two months” or “I’m gonna be fluent in a year.” Up to you. Get slightly out of your comfort zone; your goal should feel challenging, but doable.

2. Short-term goals seem to be very effective as well. How about learning thirty new words a day?

3. Write down your goals. Write them on several post-it notes and put them somewhere on display. This little mind game is super-effective and motivating.

4. Start with vocabulary. Here’s a list of the most commonly used Czech words. Then, move on to grammar.

5. There are about 300,000 root words in Czech. An average native speaker uses 35,000 words on average. As a beginner, you should master around 500 Czech words. To make small-talk, you should know 1,000-3,000 words.

4. Tips! 

The biggest advantage for you as you set out to learn Czech would be if you speak a language that uses similar grammar (German, Latin, Spanish, Greek)… Think cases, formal speech, and other fun things. Czech grammar is hard even for native speakers—it’s hard for me, too! 

How can you make progress faster?

1. Be consistent, and study every day.

2. Watch kids’ TV shows, and move on to regular TV shows when you feel confident.

3. Read books. Reading is amazing for passively building vocabulary and spelling skills.

4. Challenge yourself. Talk to natives as much as possible (or just listen).

5. Study smart: use flashcards on your phone, download an app, or sign up for an online class.

6. Make it fun and learn about the culture. There are many YouTube videos and interesting TV shows.

7. Visualize, listen, practice.

8. Find a buddy. You’ll push and motivate each other!

9. Talk to yourself, out loud and in your head. This is one of my secret tips that I used when I got serious about actually speaking English with real people (without having a heart attack).

10. Learn from your mistakes. There’s no need to be embarrassed or discouraged.

A Man Smiling while Holding His Earphone

Czech TV shows and podcasts are an excellent way of mastering the language in a pleasant and very effective way.

5. How CzechClass101.com Helps You Learn Czech in a Fun Way

CzechClass101.com will make learning Czech easy, exciting, and fun. With us, it’s not about endless memorizing or thick textbooks. Learn Czech with us and make progress faster than you can imagine!

What can you find here?

  • English-to-Czech translation and pronunciation tips/tricks
  • Over 630 audio and video lessons
  • Vocabulary learning tools
  • Spaced repetition flashcards
  • Detailed PDF lesson notes

Sign up now—it’s free!

One last thing: Let us know in the comments if this article helped you. And if you’ve been learning Czech for a while already, what’s your secret tip for avoiding mistakes? Did we forget to include anything you want to know about learning Czech fast? We’ll do our best to help!

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The 10 Most Common Mistakes in Czech to Avoid

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Mistakes are annoying, and no matter how often you tell yourself that it’s okay to make them, they still suck.

I get it, friend, I’ve been there. I’m a professional translator, and after years of living in a bilingual environment, I still have to pause from time to time and make sure I really want to say “kitchen,” not “chicken.” I ask my American boyfriend for help and clarification all the time. Also, just this morning, I read a Facebook post from Czech Television about a commemorative PLAGUE (instead of “plaque”).

In this article, we’ll be covering typical Czech mistakes that English-speakers make.

The Czech language, like all other languages, has its quirks and surprises that might catch you off-guard or flat out confuse the hell out of you.

Let’s not forget the bright side: You can learn and actually gain perspective from your mistakes. You can use them as a tool to remember certain words or grammar rules, instead of letting them frustrate you and put you off.

Let’s look at the ten most common Czech-English mistakes together.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Czech Table of Contents
  1. Common Pronunciation Mistakes for Czech-Learners
  2. Vocabulary Mistakes in the Czech Language
  3. Word Order Mistakes
  4. Grammar Mistakes
  5. Gender
  6. Word-for-Word Translation
  7. Cases
  8. Conjugation
  9. Prepositions
  10. The Biggest Mistakes and How to Avoid Them
  11. How CzechClass101.com Helps You Learn Czech in a Fun Way

1. Common Pronunciation Mistakes for Czech-Learners

Czech pronunciation might make your tongue twist, and it has nothing in common with English. Remember that Czech is a phonetic language, meaning that the pronunciation highly correlates with the written form. Other phonetic languages with a pronunciation similar to that of Czech include Italian, Spanish, Polish, and Finnish. English is not a phonetic language. 

If your goal is to pronounce Czech correctly, forget about English pronunciation altogether (at least for a bit). Too many mistakes in Czech pronunciation result from trying to incorporate English sounds and rules with those of Czech. 

A- Final consonants

Remember that there are no “silent” letters in the Czech language.

    Final consonants in the Czech language are fully pronounced, including the letter “h,” which is most often voiceless in English.
    Roll your R’s.
    Remember that “ch” is one letter.

For example, the word bůh (“god”) is pronounced without the “puff of air” (aspiration) that’s typical in English pronunciation. It’s a typical Czech mistake, and it’s pretty easy to avoid.

Before you continue, make sure you know how to pronounce consonants in Czech correctly.

B- Sound marks

Sound marks (diacritics) are the marks applied above a letter to create additional sounds other than those in the English alphabet (ž, š, č, ř, ď, ť, ň).

Whilst š, č, ď, ť, and ň can be pronounced quite well by English-speakers (since we can find similar sounds in English), ř and ž tend to be very hard for some people.

    All of these special characters can change the meaning of the word. Be aware of them and don’t ignore them.

Just a few examples:

  • jed (“poison”) / jeď (“drive”)
  • rvát (“to tear”) / řvát (“to scream”)
  • citelný (“significant” or “considerable”) / čitelný (“readable”)

Make sure you familiarize yourself with the top ten hardest words to pronounce and practice in front of a mirror. You can find the basics of how to pronounce characters with diacritics in this lesson.

A Woman in Front of a Blackboard Holding a Stack of Books

Study Czech vocabulary, watch TV shows, and practice!

2. Vocabulary Mistakes in the Czech Language

Okay, vocabulary mistakes might actually be pretty funny, but I bet you don’t want to get yourself into an awkward situation.

A- Prepositions: sem (“here”) and tady (“here”)

This one is tricky.

Remember: If you’re going somewhere (dynamic), you need to use different adverbs and prepositions than if you are/exist somewhere (static)

    ➢ Focus on associating “go” with the dynamic words and “be” with the static words.

Example:

  • Jsem v Praze. (“I am in Prague.”) / Jedu do Prahy. (“I’m going to Prague.”)

B- Correct word, wrong meaning: Czech vs. English

The first thing I want to point out is love. Not the emotion (which is beautiful no matter what), but the word.

    In the Czech language, we only say Miluju tě (“I love you”) to our children or spouses.

I strongly suggest that you stick with mám tě rád/ráda (“I am fond of you”) or mám rád/ráda (“I like”).

    Also, be careful with the word “excited.” The Czech word vzrušený (“excited”) has a sexual meaning. No exceptions.

Say těším se (“I’m looking forward to”) or Mám radost (“I am happy”) instead.

C- Similar Czech Words

Have you ever had cat soup? Gotten a slice of meat with your croissant instead of butter? Gotten a confused look when inviting someone to dinner?

Let’s look at some of the trickiest words: those that sound very similar, but have different meanings.

  • kočka (“cat”) / čočka (“lentil”)
  • včera (“yesterday”) / večer (“evening”) / večeře (“dinner”)
  • máslo (“butter”) / maso (“meat”)
  • jít (“to go by foot”) / jet (“to drive or bike”)
  • přinést (“to bring by carrying”) / přivézt (“to bring something by a vehicle”) / přivést (“to bring someone somewhere by leading”)

It looks like a lot, but it’s actually pretty easy. Just do your work, study slovíčka (“vocabulary”), and you’ll never be served a cat soup!

A Happy Face and a Sad Face

Not all words that sound similar have the same meaning!

3. Word Order Mistakes

One of the most common mistakes Czech-learners make has to do with word order, though this isn’t too difficult. The basic Czech sentence structure follows the subjectverbobject sequence (a.k.a who is doing what). For questions, it’s verbsubjectobject.

    The only rule you should always follow is that the subject ALWAYS precedes the verb.
    The most important info goes last (a.k.a save the best for last).

Example:

  • jdu do kina. (“I’m going to the movies.”)
  • Půjdeš se mnou? (“Will you go with me?”)
  • Ne, proč? (“No, why?”)
  • Proč ne? (“Why not?”)

See? Word order matters. To make things easier for you, we’ve put together this list of the top ten Czech sentence patterns. Memorizing them will help you understand and use the SVO structure.

4. Grammar Mistakes

The Czech language isn’t that difficult, but you should mind a few things:

    Czech doesn’t use personal pronouns as much as English does. Use them only for emphasis.
    When it comes to formal and informal speech, alwaysno matter whatmake sure you’re using formal when speaking to older people or in professional settings.
    I and Y aren’t always pronounced the same and they are not interchangeable.

Here’s an example:

  • Supi napadli holuby. (“Vultures attacked pigeons.”) – first case subject + verb + fourth case object
  • Supy napadli holubi. (“Pigeons attacked vultures.”) – fourth case object + verb + first case subject

We’ve said it a million times, and I’m gonna repeat it for you once more: declension matters, conjugation matters, and ignoring them will do you no good, friend.

In this article, we explain the basics of Czech grammar.

A Little Kid Frustrated with His Homework

Czech grammar isn’t any more complicated than English grammar!

5. Gender

In English, you know who’s a male and who’s a female simply from using personal pronouns. But Czech has different methods. 

Verbs, nouns, pronouns, numerals, and adjectives in Czech change form according to the grammatical case, number, and gender applied to them. If you speak Spanish, Italian, or German, great! You have an advantage.

    The ending of each verb or adjective is different depending on whether it’s feminine, masculine, or neuter.
    Masculine nouns often end with a hard or soft consonant (muž [“man”], hrad [“castle”]).
    Feminine nouns often end with an -a (žena [“woman”], dívka [“girl”]).
    Neuter nouns often end with an -o (město [“city”], světlo [“light”]).

This article will teach you everything you need to know about the Czech gender game.

6. Word-for-Word Translation

Okay, you probably know that this will never work in any language, and you do your best to respect and follow the Czech grammar and vocabulary specs.

Besides, some of your literal translations might actually be pretty embarrassing.

A- I’m excited.

Never, never use the word vzrušený. Yes, the word “excited” does mean vzrušený, but as I mentioned earlier, it has a sexual connotation in Czech. No exception.

When you’re “excited” about something, simply say:

  • To je super. (“That’s awesome.”)
  • Nemůžu se dočkat. (“I can’t wait.”) 
  • Těším se na… (“I’m looking forward to…”)

B- I’m late. / I’m good. / I’m 35.

In this case, you’ll have to learn your slovíčka (“vocabulary”) and not fall into the WFW trap.

These are the most commonly used phrases that just aren’t the same in Czech:

  • “I am late.” (Jsem pozdě.) –> “I am coming late.” / “I am arriving late.” (Mám zpoždění/jdu pozdě.)
  • “I’m good, thanks.” (Jsem dobře.) –> “I have myself good, thanks.” (Mám se dobře, díky.)
  • “I’m hot.” (Jsem horká.) –> “It is hot to me.” (Je mi horko.)
  • “I’m 35.” (Jsem 35.) –> “It is 35 to me.” (Je mi 35.)
Man Unsure about Something

Excited or not?

7. Cases

In Czech, every noun and adjective changes its ending based on its position in the sentence and its function or preposition. That means that every noun has fourteen forms (in singular and plural)—fourteen different endings. Unsurprisingly, many common Czech-English mistakes arise in the form of case confusion. 

Every gender has a set of model nouns (paradigms). Each model noun represents all the other nouns within that gender that carry the same type of ending in the nominative. 

There’s no shortcut around this—you will have to learn every model noun, memorize the endings, and learn how to apply them to other nouns in the same group.

Don’t think you’ll get away with just the first case. 

The same goes for…

8. Conjugation

Czech conjugation and declension essentially provide context so that you know who is doing the action, and when.

The rules are pretty straightforward and easy to understand, but there are also exceptions and irregular verbs.

The two verbs you’ll need and use a lot are:

  • Mít (“to have”)

And

  • Být (“to be”)

Make sure you know how to work with them and use them correctly. Feeling lost? Here’s a list of the fifty most common Czech verbs.

A Man Confused about Pictures on a Blackboard

Conjugation and declension actually make things easier and provide context.

9. Prepositions

In this case, most English-speakers have trouble telling apart “motion” and “static.”

These three guys seem to cause the most confusion:

Do (“Into”): describes a motion into closed places

    Jdu do školy. (“I’m going into school.”)
    Dej to do auta. (“Put it into the car.”)

K (“To”): describes a motion to a point or in connection with visiting someone

    Jedeme k babičce. (“We’re driving to grandma.”)
    Došla jsem k jeho domu. (“I walked to his house.”)

Na (“To”): actions and activities

    Jdeme na výlet. (“We’re going to [on] a trip.”)
    Jedeme na dovolenou. (“We’re going to [on] vacation.”)

Make sure you know what noun prepositions are related to.

10. The Biggest Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

The biggest mistake to make when learning a new language is to be afraid of making mistakes. Remember, by making mistakes, you’ll likely remember the problem/word/specific situation, and it will help you avoid the same mistake in the future.

Don’t rely on books alone. Put yourself out there and start a convo with Czech natives. Watch movies and TV shows in Czech. Read books or articles on the internet.

Variety is the key! Plus, you won’t get bored.

In this article, we summed up the most common Czech-English mistakes. Watch out for them, and your Czech-learning experience will be easy-peasy! Good luck!

11. How CzechClass101.com Helps You Learn Czech in a Fun Way

CzechClass101.com will make learning Czech easy, exciting, and fun. With us, it’s not about endless memorizing or thick textbooks. Learn Czech with us and make progress faster than you can imagine!

What can you find here?

  • English-to-Czech translation and pronunciation tips & tricks
  • Over 630 audio and video lessons
  • Vocabulary learning tools
  • Spaced repetition flashcards
  • Detailed PDF lesson notes

Sign up now—it’s free!

One last thing: Let us know in the comments if this article helped you, and how you’ve been able to avoid mistakes in Czech in the past! Is there anything more you want to know about the common Czech sentence mistakes? We’ll do our best to help!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Czech

The 10 Most Common Czech Questions and Answers

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Hello there, friend! How are you today? How has your day been? How long have you been studying Czech? Do you speak other languages? Do you speak English? 

You can probably tell that this article is all about the most common Czech questions and answers. I’m going to teach you some basic questions in Czech that may come up in pretty much any conversation, and how to answer them.

Why is this important? Well, learning these common phrases and questions will create a great base for your vocabulary and make any interaction in Czech a lot easier for you.

There’s more to it, of course. Asking the right question is an awesome way to start a conversation, learn new things, get where you want to be (geographically and spiritually), and learn Czech in a fun and interesting way.

So how do you say questions in Czech? What question words in Czech are the most used?

Let’s get into this.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Czech Table of Contents
  1. What is your name?
  2. Do you speak Czech/English?
  3. Where are you from? + Where do you live?
  4. How long have you been studying Czech?
  5. Have you been to the Czech Republic?
  6. How are you?
  7. Do you like Czech food?
  8. What are you doing?
  9. What’s wrong?
  10. How much is it?
  11. How CzechClass101.com Helps You Learn Czech in a Fun Way

1. What is your name?

First Encounter

As Czech uses formal and informal speech, there are two ways to ask Czech questions, depending on the situation. Aside from that, it’s easy-peasy.

Questions:

  • Jak se jmenuješ? (“How are you named?” = “What is your name?”)
    People your age; informal speech.
  • Jak se jmenujete? (“How are you named?” = “What is your name?”)
    People older than you; formal speech (vykání).

Occasionally, you might hear this question as well:

  • A ty jsi…? (“And you are…?”)
    Informal speech.
  • A vy jste…? (“And you are…?”)
    Formal speech.

Answers:

  • Já jsem Petra. (“I am Petra.”)
  • Jmenuju se Petra. (“My name is Petra.”)

Both versions are interchangeable.

Colleagues Meeting Each Other for the First Time

Hi, my name is Petra!

2. Do you speak Czech/English?

Again, formal and informal speech differ for this question in Czech.

Questions:

  • Mluvíš česky/anglicky? (“Do you speak Czech/English?”)
    Informal speech.
  • Mluvíte česky/anglicky? (“Do you speak Czech/English?”)
    Formal speech.
  • Umíš česky/anglicky? (“Can you [speak] Czech/English?”)
    Informal speech.
  • Umíte česky/anglicky? (“Can you [speak] Czech/English?”)
    Formal speech.

Answers:

  • Mluvím česky. (“I speak Czech.”)
  • Mluvím anglicky. (“I speak English.”)
  • Nemluvím česky. (“I don’t speak Czech.”)
  • Nemluvím anglicky. (“I don’t speak English.”)
  • Ano, trochu. (“Yes, a little.”)
  • Ano, velmi dobře. (“Yes, very well.”)
  • Ano, ale ne moc dobře. (“Yes, but not very well.”)
  • Ano, docela dobře. (“Yes, quite well.”)
  • Bohužel ne. (“Sorry, I don’t.”)

3. Where are you from? + Where do you live?

Czech Republic Flag

That’s the place I call home. Where are you from?

Questions:

  • Odkud jsi? (“Where are you from?”)
    Informal speech.
  • Odkud jste? (“Where are you from?”)
    Formal speech.
  • Kde bydlíš? (“Where do you live?”)
    Informal speech.
  • Kde bydlíte? (“Where do you live?”)
    Formal speech.

Answers:

  • Jsem z České republiky. (“I am from the Czech Republic.”)
  • Jsem z Prahy. (“I am from Prague.”)
  • Bydlím v USA. (“I live in the U.S.”)
  • Žiju v Praze. (“I live in Prague.”)

Dive deeper and read this lesson to get a grip on Czech phrases and questions related to this topic.

Of course, not everyone lives in the U.S. or the Czech Republic. Find your country and learn how to pronounce it in Czech on Wikipedia or our website

Getting ready for a convo about geography? This article is a must-read for ya!

4. How long have you been studying Czech?

Introducing Yourself

This is the Czech question you should definitely expect to hear if you’ve gotten this far in the conversation! 

Questions:

  • Jak dlouho se učíš česky? (“How long have you been studying Czech?”)
    Informal speech.
  • Jak dlouho se učíte česky? (“How long have you been studying Czech?”)
    Formal speech.
  • Učíš se česky už dlouho? (“Have you been studying Czech for a long time?”)
    Informal speech.
  • Učíte se česky už dlouho? (“Have you been studying Czech for a long time?”)
    Formal speech.

Answers:

  • Učím se česky rok. (“I have been studying Czech for a year.”)
  • Učím se česky od minulého roku. (“I have been studying Czech since last year.”)
  • Ano, učím se česky už dlouho. (“Yes, I have been studying Czech for a long time.”)
  • Ne, neučím se česky dlouho. (“No, I haven’t been studying Czech for a long time.”)

5. Have you been to the Czech Republic?

This Czech question may come up during the conversation, especially if you say you’ve been learning the language for a while.

Questions:

  • Byl/byla jsi někdy v České republice? (“Have you ever been to the Czech Republic?”)
    Informal speech; [masculine/feminine].
  • Byl/byla jste někdy v České republice? (“Have you ever been to the Czech Republic?”)
    Formal speech; masculine/feminine.
  • Jedeš do České republiky? (“Are you going to the Czech Republic?”)
    Informal speech.
  • Jedete do České republiky? (“Are you going to the Czech Republic?”)
    Formal speech.

Answers:

  • Zatím ne. (“Not yet.”)
  • Rád/ráda bych se tam brzy podíval/podívala. (“I would like to visit soon.” – masculine/feminine)
  • Ano, moc se mi tam líbilo. (“Yes, I liked it very much.”)
  • Ano, ale vůbec se mi tam nelíbilo. (“Yes, but I didn’t like it at all.”)

6. How are you?

A Group of Women Catching Up with Each Other

How have you been?

If you’ve made a new Czech friend, you may want to ask how they’re doing next time you see each other. Here are the most common ways to ask and answer this question in Czech.

Questions:

Informal speech:

  • Jak se máš? (“How are you?”)
  • Jak se ti vede? (“How are you doing?”)
  • Jak se vede? (“How is it going?”)
  • Jak se ti daří? (“How are you doing?”)
  • š se dobře? (“Are you doing well?”)
  • Co je nového? (“What’s new?”)

Formal speech:

  • Jak se máte? (“How are you?”)
  • Jak se vám vede? (“How are you doing?”)
  • Jak se vám daří? (“How are you doing?”)
  • te se dobře? (“Are you doing well?”)

Answers:

  • Mám se dobře! (“I’m good!”)
  • A vy/ty? (“And you?” – formal/informal)
  • Daří se mi dobře, děkuji. (“I’m doing well.”)
  • A tobě/vám? (“And you?” – formal/informal)
  • Mám hodně práce. (“I am very busy.”)
  • Nic se nezměnilo. (“Nothing has changed.”)
  • Mám spoustu novinek! (“I have a lot of news!”)

    ➢ Keep in mind that it’s not common to use “How are you?” as a part of just any greeting, such as at the store or in a restaurant while placing an order. The waiters and sales assistants or cashiers would probably be genuinely surprised if you asked (not in a bad way, though).

7. Do you like Czech food?

Svíčková Omáčka Dish

Svíčková omáčka (beef with creamy sauce and dumplings) is one of the most popular Czech meals.

Questions:

  • š rád/ráda české jídlo? (“Do you like Czech food?”)
    Masculine/Feminine; informal speech.
  • te rád/ráda české jídlo? (“Do you like Czech food?”)
    Masculine/Feminine; formal speech.
  • Chutná ti české jídlo? (“Do you like the taste of the Czech food?”)
    Informal speech.
  • Chutná vám české jídlo? (“Do you like the taste of the Czech food?”)
    Formal speech.
  • Jaké je tvoje nejoblíbenější české jídlo? (“What’s your favorite Czech food?”)
    Informal speech.
  • Jaké je vaše nejoblíbenější české jídlo? (“What’s your favorite Czech food?”)

Answers:

  • Ano, je velmi dobré. (“Yes, it’s very good.”)
  • Ano, chutná skvěle. (“Yes, it tastes great.”)
  • Ne, nechutná mi. (“No, I don’t like it.”)
  • Ne, nemám. (“No, I don’t.”)
  • Nejvíc mi chutná řízek. (“I like schnitzel the most.”)
  • Česká kuchyně mi vůbec nechutná. (“I don’t like Czech cuisine at all.”)
  • Miluju české jídlo! (“I love Czech food!”)

Have you been invited to lunch or dinner? Czech out this article and make sure you know how to ask for the food you want to eat!

8. What are you doing?

Man and Woman Talking, Flirting

“What are you doing on Wednesday?”

Questions:

Informal speech:

  • Co děláš ve středu? (“What are you doing on Wednesday?”)
  • Co děláš? (“What are you doing?”)
  • Proč to děláš? (“Why are you doing this?”)
  • Co právě teď děláš? (“What are you doing right now?”)
  • Děláš něco? (“Are you doing anything?”)
  • Co budeš dělat? (“What are you going to do about it?”)

Formal speech:

  • Co děláte ve středu? (“What are you doing on Wednesday?”)
  • Co děláte? (“What are you doing?”)
  • Proč to děláte? (“Why are you doing this?”)
  • Co právě teď děláte? (“What are you doing right now?”)
  • Děláte něco? (“Are you doing anything?”)
  • Co budete dělat? (“What are you going to do about it?”)

Answers:

  • Na středu mám plány. (“I have plans for Wednesday.”)
  • Ve středu mám volno. (“I’m free on Wednesday.”)
  • Nedělám nic. (“I’m not doing anything.”)
  • Teď něco dělám. (“I’m busy right now.”)
  • Nevím, co mám dělat. (“I don’t know what to do.”)
  • Nevím, co s tím udělám. (“I don’t know what I’ll do about it.”)

9. What’s wrong?

Not all days are sunny, and you may want to express your concern for someone if they seem down. Here’s how to ask what happened in Czech.

Questions:

  • Co se stalo? (“What happened?”)
  • Stalo se něco? (“Has anything happened?”)
  • Co se děje? (“What is going on?”)
  • Jsi v pořádku? (“Are you okay?”)
    Informal speech.
  • Jste v pořádku? (“Are you okay?”)
    Formal speech.
  • Potřebuješ pomoc? (“Do you need help?”)
    Informal speech.
  • Potřebujete pomoc? (“Do you need help?”)
    Formal speech.

Answers:

  • Nic se nestalo. (“Nothing happened.”)
  • Všechno je v pořádku. (“Everything is alright.”)
  • Něco se stalo. (“Something happened.”)
  • Potřebuju pomoc. (“I need help.”)
  • Nepotřebuju pomoc. (“I don’t need help.”)
  • Pomozte mi, prosím. (“Help me, please.”)
  • Pomůžu ti. (“I’ll help you.”)
    Informal speech.
  • Pomůžu vám. (“I’ll help you.”)
    Formal speech.

10. How much is it?

A Man Comparing Olive Oil Prices

Which one is on sale?

When you go shopping and there’s no price tag, you’re going to have to ask someone about the price (unless you’re really, really rich or Buddhist).

Questions:

  • Kolik to stojí? (“How much is it?”)
  • Kolik tohle stojí? (“How much is this?”)
  • Kolik stojí tamto? (“How much is that?”)
  • Je to ve slevě? (“Is it on sale?”)
  • Je to drahé? (“Is it expensive?”)
  • Je to levné? (“Is it cheap?”)

Answers:

  • Je to moc drahé. (“It’s too expensive.”)
  • Je to levné. (“It’s cheap.”)
  • Tohle je levnější. (“This is cheaper.”)
  • Stojí to 500 korun. (“It’s 500 crowns.”)
  • Je to ve slevě. (“It’s on sale.”)
  • Není to ve slevě. (“It’s not on sale.”)

We can’t tell you how to handle money, but we can teach you to talk about it in Czech. Find related vocabulary and phrases on CzechClass101.com.

How CzechClass101.com Helps You Learn Czech in a Fun Way

CzechClass101.com will make learning Czech easy, exciting, and fun. With us, it’s not about endless memorizing or thick textbooks. Learn Czech with us and make progress faster than you can imagine!

What can you find here?

  • English-to-Czech translation and pronunciation tips/tricks
  • Over 630 audio and video lessons
  • Vocabulary learning tools
  • Spaced repetition flashcards
  • Detailed PDF lesson notes

Sign up now—it’s free!

One last thing: Let us know in the comments if this article helped you. Oh, and what’s your secret tip that helped you learn how to ask questions in Czech? Is there anything you want to know about other common questions in Czech? We’ll do our best to help!

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How to Nail Your CCE Czech Language Exam

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Taking a Czech language test or exam is a decision that might change your entire life.

Let’s get a bit touchy-feely and personal, shall we? 

My long story short: “Oh, maybe I want to be a translator or something, what do I do? Okay, apparently I need a certificate…when’s the next exam date? In a few weeks? Cool! Erm… How am I supposed to learn all this stuff in three weeks?” -> Daily panic attacks and lots of crying in the shower (figuratively speaking). -> Passed the exam. -> Works as a freelance translator and writer, currently sitting on a couch thousands of miles away from home, and writing an article on how to pass a Czech language test.

See? It’s doable, even if you don’t have the time (or money) for a specialized prep course.

A language exam is not as bad as it might seem. First of all, it’s just a Czech test. You’re not putting your pet’s life at risk, the world won’t stop spinning, your mom will love you no matter what, and there will be lots of new Marvel movies—no matter the result.

Of course, you want to pass. And maybe your ambitions are even higher. Maybe you want to ROCK! You don’t need a magic pill or superpowers. You just need to study, keep positive, and believe in yourself.

In this guide, we’ll explain everything you need to know for smooth sailing: Where to apply, how to prepare for the Czech Language Certificate Exam (CCE), and how to ace your test without losing faith in life.

A Happy Man with A+ Score

Nail your CCE with CzechClass101!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Study Strategies in Czech Table of Contents
  1. Who Should Take it and How to Apply
  2. A Closer Look at the Czech Language Certificate Exam
  3. Top 10 Tips for Preparing for Your Czech Language Test
  4. How CzechClass101.com Helps You Prepare for Your Czech Language Certificate Exam

1. Who Should Take it and How to Apply

The Czech Language Certificate Exam (CCE) was developed by the Institute for Language and Preparatory Studies of Charles University in Prague. If you’re a non-EU citizen applying for a permanent residence, you’re going to have to go through this, friend. Thus, it’s sometimes called the “Czech citizenship test.”

To pass, your communication skills must reach the required B1 language proficiency level under the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR). 

You might want to consider getting the certificate even if you’re not after a permanent residence in the Czech Republic. Some employers might want to see proof of your language proficiency, too. Speaking from personal experience, Czech employers love certificates and diplomas the way that businesses in English-speaking countries adore references.

Last but not least: a CCE certificate might also help you with the university application process if you’re looking to study in the Czech Republic.

Not sure if you need to put yourself through this? Check out the Ministry of the Czech Republic website.

Language Skills

A- CCE Test Registration

Yay for modern technology! 

You can register online. Just fill out an application form on the ILPS CU website and submit.

It’s possible to take the CCE exam in the Czech Republic (Prague and Brno), and in more than fifteen other countries around the world. 

    ➢ You’ll need to enroll at least three weeks before the exam (or by the date set by the foreign examination center if you’re going to take the exam abroad).
    ➢ You’ll also need to pay the fee two weeks before your exam date.
    ➢ You can select your exam venue and date in the application form.

For a complete list of countries and fees, check out this section of the official website.

B- Exam Structure

The CCE exam tests your reading comprehension, listening comprehension, and writing skills. The oral part of the exam tests your speaking abilities.

The CCE exam has five parts:

1. Reading Comprehension 
2. Listening Comprehension
3. Grammar/Lexical Text
4. Writing
5. Speaking

You can find more info on the official website.

Someone Answering Multiple-choice Questions

For the speaking part, you work in pairs. During the tests—you’re on your own, buddy.

C- Levels of Proficiency

The CCE has five levels of Czech proficiency, corresponding with those of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR):

CCE–A1: Beginner. This exam tests your ability to understand and use basic expressions and phrases (you’re able to introduce yourself and interact in the Czech language at a slow pace).

CCE–A2: Lower-intermediate. At this level, you can understand more-complex sentences and frequently used expressions and phrases. You’re also able to communicate and describe things using simple terms.

CCE–B1: Intermediate level. You’re able to communicate, as well as describe events and experiences in Czech.

CCE–B2: Upper-intermediate. You’re a “confident Czech speaker.” You’re able to understand more-complex content related to your field and speak Czech without any huge effort or preparation.

CCE–C1: Advanced. Longer and complex interactions are a piece of cake for you. You’re able to use Czech for social, academic, or professional situations.

    ➢ The Czech CCE–B2 and CCE–C1 exams are recognized for demonstrating the language skills of individuals applying for employment in the Czech Republic.
    ➢ At each of the five proficiency levels, the Czech Language Certificate Exam tests candidates’ communicative proficiency with the criteria stated in the CEFR.

D- Results: Did I Pass?

The results for your CCE exam will be posted online within thirty days. The certificate will be mailed to you within seven weeks following your exam.

    In order to pass, you need to get a score of at least 60% overall AND at least 60% in each of the five parts.

2. A Closer Look at the Czech Language Certificate Exam

In the following sections, I’ll outline what you can expect to see in each part of this Czech language proficiency test. 

A- Introduction to the Listening Section

ProficiencyTimeTasks
A120-25 minutes4 tasks in totalMultiple-choiceMatching 
A220-25 minutes4 tasks in totalTrue/FalseMultiple-choiceMatching 
B135-40 minutes4 tasks in totalMatchingMultiple-choiceTrue/False
B240-45 minutes4 tasks in totalMatchingMultiple-choiceTrue/False
C150-55 minutes4 tasks in totalMatchingMultiple matchingMultiple-choiceTrue/False
    The audio is played twice.

Listening is often the most dreaded part of the Czech language test, and listening comprehension is considered the hardest skill to develop.

How can you be sure to pass this part of the test, then?

A Man Listening to Something

Practice active listening daily!

Nail It!

Before the Exam:

  1. Prepare. People often recommend listening to or watching movies in your target language (with or without subtitles). However, passive listening isn’t enough, and it won’t get you anywhere. You need to LISTEN. Put a movie/podcast/YouTube video on, grab a piece of paper, and focus. Twenty minutes a day will make a huge difference.
  1. Start with a topic that you’re interested in. This can be anything you like—watch make-up tutorials on YouTube if that’s your thing; watch fishing videos, cooking shows…you need to be engaged.
  1. Start with audio/video that’s quite easy for you to understand. After a few days, move on to another level that’s a little bit above yours—this is very important. In order to make progress, you NEED to challenge yourself, regardless of whether you’re going to take the A1 or C1 Czech test level.
  1. Another great option is talking to native speakers (I can’t recommend this enough).
  1. Practice listening at slow, moderate, and fast speeds. Try this video for beginners (great for A1 and A2).
  1. Write down words, phrases, and idioms you don’t understand and memorize them.

During the Exam:

  1. Focus on the big picture and save details for later. Try to get a good grasp of the context and message the first time the audio is played. The second time, figure out the rest.
  1. Be alert. Don’t forget that you can’t rewind.
  1. Jot down notes. Write down the topic and core points (you can use your exam sheets for this).
Students Taking a Test in a Classroom

B- Introduction to the Reading Section

ProficiencyTimeTasks
A1(+ Writing) 60 minutes6 tasks in total (10-80 words)2 writing tasks (20 and 20-30 words)
A245 minutes4 tasks in total (80-170 words)True/False and multiple-choice
B150 minutes4 tasks in totalTrue/False
B250 minutes4 tasks in totalTrue/FalseMatching
C160 minutes4 tasks in totalTrue/FalseMatchingMultiple matching

Nail It!

Before the Exam:

  1. Remember that this isn’t just about readingit’s about comprehension. Don’t focus on individual words and literal meanings; try to find the core message and emotions.
  1. Practice the timing. Your attention likely dwindles (or even disappears) after a certain amount of time. Try to push yourself by adding a couple of minutes every time you read.
  1. Work on your vocabulary (I’m gonna say this a lot, for a good reason!). Write down words you don’t know, and memorize them. You can use our Vocab Builder.
  1. Read articles, magazines, books, and subtitles. Try our Reading Lesson for Intermediate or Beginner Czech learners. We also have a great Reading Guide for ya.

During the Exam:

  1. Read the text first. Focus.
  1. After that, read the questions
  1. If you get lost or confused, summarize what you’ve read so far. Skim through the text and look for the context.
  1. For the A1 Czech language test, you should spend no more than 35 minutes on the reading. Then, move on to the writing part (25 minutes).

C- Introduction to the Writing Section

ProficiencyTimeTasks
A1Included in the Reading Comprehension part
A240 minutes2 tasks
B160 minutes2 tasks
B280 minutes2 tasks
C190 minutes2 tasks

Writing might be tricky for you. Trust me, at the time of my exam, I was a seasoned writer (with a degree in journalism), my English was okay, but the writing task was a pain for me. This is because I wasn’t used to writing by hand, and I didn’t spend enough time practicing.

Learn from my mistakes!

Nail It!

Before the Exam:

  1. Practice the timing. This is very important, and I wish I hadn’t slacked on this. Find a topic, hit the Start button or your stopwatch, and get to work.
  1. Read! This will help you get accustomed to various sentence structures, and improve your vocabulary and spelling.
  1. Learn proper punctuation. The punctuation in Czech and English is very different. You don’t want to lose points on periods and commas, do you?

Start with simple, short pieces. When you feel comfortable enough, move up to more complex texts. We have a great guide on How to Write 1000 Czech Words in 5 Minutes a Day that will help you get started. Check it out:

During the Exam:

  1. Read the instructions twice. I know way too many people who failed an exam just because they didn’t read (and follow) the guidelines.
  1. Start with an outline.
  1. Use as much vocabulary and grammar elements as you can. You want to show off—if you have it, flaunt it. But…
  1. …if you get super-nervous, keep your pieces short and coherent.
  1. Make sure you have enough time to review your work—five minutes should be enough. This is especially important if you’re taking the Czech B1 exam or higher.

D- Introduction to the Speaking Section

ProficiencyTimeTasks
A15-8 minutes (per person)2 tasksYour family, hobbies, where you’re fromAsking and giving information about institutions or events
A210-13 minutes (per pair)2 tasksYour family, hobbies, where you’re fromAsking and giving information about institutions or events
B115-18 minutes (per pair)3 tasksIntroduce yourself (2 minutes)The examiner asks questions (general topics, 3-4 minutes) + you’ll describe an imageThe candidates have to communicate and plan an event or trip
B218-21 minutes (per pair)3 tasksIntroduce yourself (3 minutes)The examiner asks questions (general topics, 3-4 minutes) + you’ll describe an imageThe candidates have to communicate and plan an event or trip (3 minutes per candidate)
C123-27 minutes (per pair)3 tasksDialogue on given sayings or quotes (the examiner asks questions, approx. 5 minutes per candidate)5-minute monologue (culture, sports, etc.)The candidates have to communicate and look for a solution to a situation (5-6 minutes per candidate)

This part will be easy and fun if you’re a talker! If you like to keep your mouth shut, practice even harder.

    You’ll be working in pairs, asking each other questions.
Colleagues Discussing Something

The topics usually include: 

  • Work or school
  • Where you learned Czech 
  • How long you’ve been studying Czech
  • Your hobbies
  • Why you decided to study Czech
  • How many languages you speak

Possible situations:

  • Information about museums/galleries
  • You’re at the hospital/restaurant/university/party/trip/etc.

Nail It!

Before the Exam:

  1. Practice, practice, talk, talk, talk. Super-important. 
  1. Practice the timing. Get an image and describe it. Prepare a short introduction including where you’re from, what you like to do, etc.
  1. Practice asking questions.
  1. Work on your pronunciation.
  1. Check out our neat videos for conversation practice here and here.

During the Exam:

  1. Talk. A lot. Do not stop talking—let the examiners stop you.
  1. Use as much vocabulary and grammar elements as possible, especially if you’re taking the Czech B1 exam or higher.

3. Top 10 Tips for Preparing for Your Czech Language Test

  1. Know your strengths and weaknesses. It doesn’t matter if you’ve spent years in the Czech Republic or just completed your first exercise at CzechClass101.com. Assess your skills and get clear on where you’re at.
  1. Bring your strongest skills to the highest possible level. Do not slack off. Make sure you feel super-confident.
  1. Work on your weaker points daily. Practice. Get out of your comfort zone, whatever that means for you. Strike up a conversation with a native speaker, learn ten new words a day, try reading magazine articles in Czech… Make progress.
  1. Know the structure of the exam like the palm of your hand: the types of questions, topics, timing…gather as much info as you can.
  1. Check past exam papers and materials. You need to get used to the format and patterns.
  1. Buy textbooks prepared specifically for the exam candidates and use them.
  1. Practice the tasks. Set a timer and try talking about specific topics mentioned in the textbooks and study materials. Read. Answer questions. Take a CCE mock test. Do this every single day.
  1. Practice the timing and plan ahead. Figure out how much time you have to answer one question. You might need to save some time for a double-check—keep that in mind.
  1. Learn from your mistakes. Seeing your most-frequent errors will help you see which skills you need to practice and develop the most.
  1. For the sake of your Czech test results, try to get at least a tiny bit above your level of proficiency. Show off. Try to use as much vocabulary (including idioms) as possible. Practice daily! You need to get used to using new words and sentence structures.

Last but not least:

    Stay calm. If you get overly anxious, focus on your breathing for a few seconds. Think positive thoughts and don’t let any doubt creep in.

Good luck!

4. How CzechClass101.com Helps You Prepare for Your Czech Language Certificate Exam

In this guide, I did my best to help you understand the structure and requirements of the CCE.

CzechClass101.com is a modern, multi-device platform for Czech language-learners that makes learning Czech easy, exciting, and fun. Make sure you check out our video and audio lessons, and don’t forget to use our vocabulary learning tools!

What else can you find on our website?

  • English-to-Czech translation and pronunciation tips & tricks
  • Over 630 audio and video lessons
  • Vocabulary learning tools
  • Spaced repetition flashcards
  • Detailed PDF lesson notes

Sign up now; it’s free!

Before you go and create your account, let us know in the comments if you feel more prepared for your test now! Is there anything I haven’t covered that you still want to know?

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Czech Keyboard: How to Install and Type in Czech

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You asked, so we provided—easy-to-follow instructions on how to set up your electronic devices to write in Czech! We’ll also give you a few excellent tips on how to use this keyboard, as well as some online and app alternatives if you prefer not to set up a Czech keyboard.

Log in to Download Your Free Czech Alphabet Worksheet Table of Contents
  1. Why it’s Important to Learn to Type in Czech
  2. Setting up Your Computer and Mobile Devices for Czech
  3. How to Activate an Onscreen Keyboard on Your Computer
  4. How to Change the Language Settings to Czech on Your Computer
  5. Activating the Czech Keyboard on Your Mobile Phone and Tablet
  6. How to Practice Typing Czech

1. Why it’s Important to Learn to Type in Czech

A keyboard

Learning a new language is made so much easier when you’re able to read and write/type it. This way, you will:

  • Get the most out of any dictionary and Czech language apps on your devices
  • Expand your ability to find Czech websites and use the various search engines
  • Be able to communicate much better online with your Czech teachers and friends, and look super cool in the process! 

2. Setting up Your Computer and Mobile Devices for Czech

A phone charging on a dock

It takes only a few steps to set up any of your devices to read and type in Czech. It’s super-easy on your mobile phone and tablet, and a simple process on your computer.

On your computer, you’ll first activate the onscreen keyboard to work with. You’ll only be using your mouse or touchpad/pointer for this keyboard. Then, you’ll need to change the language setting to Czech, so all text will appear in Czech. You could also opt to use online keyboards instead. Read on for the links!

On your mobile devices, it’s even easier—you only have to change the keyboard. We also provide a few alternatives in the form of online keyboards and downloadable apps.

3. How to Activate an Onscreen Keyboard on Your Computer

1- Mac

1. Go to System Preferences > Keyboard.

2. Check the option “Show Keyboard & Character Viewers in Menu Bar.”

3. You’ll see a new icon on the right side of the main bar; click on it and select “Show Keyboard Viewer.”

A screenshot of the keyboard viewer screen

2- Windows

1. Go to Start > Settings > Easy Access > Keyboard.

2. Turn on the option for “Onscreen Keyboard.”

3- Add-ons of Extensions for Browsers

Instead of an online keyboard, you could also choose to download a Google extension to your browser for a language input tool. The Google Input Tools extension allows users to use input tools in Chrome web pages, for example.

4. How to Change the Language Settings to Czech on Your Computer

Man looking at his computer

Now that you’re all set to work with an onscreen keyboard on your computer, it’s time to download the Czech language pack for your operating system of choice:

  • Windows 8 (and higher)
  • Windows 7
  • Mac (OS X and higher)

1- Windows 8 (and higher)

  1. Go to “Settings” > “Change PC Settings” > “Time & Language” > “Region & Language.”
  2. Click on “Add a Language” and select “čeština – Czech.” This will add it to your list of languages. It will appear as Czech with the note “language pack available.”
  3. Click on “čeština” > “Options” > “Download.” It will take a few minutes to download and install the language pack.

2- Windows 7

  1. Go to “Start” > “Control Panel” > “Clock, Language, and Region.”
  2. On the “Region and Language” option, click on “Change Keyboards or Other Input Methods.”
  3. On the “Keyboards and Languages” tab, click on “Change Keyboards” > “Add” > “Czech.”
  4. Expand the option of “Czech” and then expand the option “Keyboard.” Select the keyboard layout marked as “Czech.” You can ignore other keyboard layouts. Click “OK” and then “Apply.”

3- Mac (OS X and higher)

If you can’t see the language listed, please make sure to select the right option from System Preferences > Language and Region

1. From the Apple Menu (top left corner of the screen) go to System Preferences > Keyboard.

2. Click the Input Sources tab and a list of available keyboards and input methods will appear.

3. Click on the plus button, select “Czech,” and add the “Czech – QWERTY” keyboard.

Adding a system language

5. Activating the Czech Keyboard on Your Mobile Phone and Tablet

Texting and searching in Czech will greatly help you master the language! Adding a Czech keyboard on your mobile phone and/or tablet is super-easy.

You could also opt to download an app instead of adding a keyboard. Read on for our suggestions.

Below are the instructions for both iOS and Android mobile phones and tablets.

1- iOS

1. Go to Settings > General > Keyboard.

2. Tap “Keyboards” and then “Add New Keyboard.”

3. Select “Czech” from the list.

4. When typing, you can switch between languages by tapping and holding on the icon to reveal the keyboard language menu.

2- Android

1. Go to Settings > General Management > Language and Input > On-screen Keyboard (or “Virtual Keyboard” on some devices) > Samsung Keyboard.

2. Tap “Language and Types” or “ + Select Input Languages” depending on the device and then “MANAGE INPUT LANGUAGES” if available.

3. Select “čeština” from the list.

4. When typing, you can switch between languages by swiping the space bar.

3- Applications for Mobile Phones

If you don’t want to add a keyboard on your mobile phone or tablet, this is a good app to consider:

A man typing on a computer

6. How to Practice Typing Czech

As you probably know by now, learning Czech is all about practice, practice, and more practice! Strengthen your Czech typing skills by writing comments on any of our lesson pages, and our teacher will answer. If you’re a CzechClass101 Premium PLUS member, you can directly text our teacher via the My Teacher app—use your Czech keyboard to do this!

Log in to Download Your Free Czech Alphabet Worksheet

Secret Revealed: The Best Way to Learn a Language on Your Own

Learning A Language on Your Own

Can You Really Learn Czech Alone?

Learning a language on your own or without traditional classroom instruction may seem quite daunting at first. What if you run into questions? How do you stay motivated and on track to achieving goals?

Don’t worry, not only is it possible to learn Czech or any language without traditional classroom instruction: CzechClass101 has created the world’s most advanced and extensive online language learning system. Not only is CzechClass101 specifically designed to help you with learning a language on your own, it’s actually faster, more convenient, and less expensive than traditional classroom options!

Let’s look at some of the benefits of learning Czech or any language alone.

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Also, don’t forget to download your free cheat sheet – How to Improve Your Language Skills too!

3 Reasons to Learn a Language Alone

Learning Alone

1. Learn at Your Own Pace and On Your Schedule

In today’s fast-paced world, there just isn’t time for traditional classroom instruction. Between getting to class and studying on some professor or teacher’s schedule, traditional classroom learning is simply impossible to fit in. But when you learn Czech alone, you can study in bed if you like and whenever suits your schedule best, making it far easier to actually reach your goal of learning and mastering the language.

2. Learning a Language on Your Own Reduces Stress and Anxiety

Speaking in front of a class, pop quizzes, and tests are just a few of the stressors you will encounter when you learn a language in a traditional classroom setting. Specifically, these are external stressors that often derail most people’s dream of learning a new language. But when you learn Czech alone, there are no external stressors. Without the external stress and anxiety, it becomes much easier and more exciting to study Czech and reach your very own goals—all on your own!

3. Learning Czech Alone Helps Improve Cognitive Function and Overall Success

Learning a language on your own is indeed more challenging in some ways than being taught in a traditional classroom setting. In fact, while classroom instruction requires more rote memorization and following instructions, studying a language on your own requires more problem-solving and higher cognitive function to self-teach lessons and hit goals. So while it’s more challenging and requires higher levels of cognition, teaching yourself a language pays dividends throughout life by better preparing you for social/work opportunities that arise.

How to Learn a Language on Your Own with CzechClass101

Learning with CzechClass101

1. Access to the World’s Largest Collection of Czech Audio & Video Lessons

The best way to learn a language on your own is to study from native speaking instructors. Ideally, you want audio and/or video lessons that teach vocabulary, grammar, and provide actual Czech conversations and dialogue to help you with pronunciation. CzechClass101 has hundreds of hours of HD audio and video lessons created by real Czech instructors and every lesson is presented by professional Czech actors for perfect pronunciation. Plus, all lessons can be accessed 24/7 via any mobile device with Internet access. And, if you download the PDF versions of each lesson, you can even study without Internet access once the lesson is stored on your device!

2. “Learning Paths” with Czech Courses Based Upon Your Exact Needs & Goals

Although CzechClass101 has more than thousands of video and audio lessons, you need not review each and every one to learn the language. In fact, CzechClass101 has developed a feature called “Learning Paths”. You simply tell us your goals and we will identify the best courses and study plan to help you reach them in the shortest time possible. So even though you are technically learning a language on your own, our team is always here to help and make sure you reach your goals FAST!

3. Advanced Learning Tools Reduce Learning Time and Boost Retention

When you have the right tools and Czech learning resources, it’s actually easy to teach yourself a language! In the past 10+ years, CzechClass101 has developed, tested, and refined more than 20 advanced learning tools to boost retention and reduce learning time, including:

  • Spaced Repetition Flashcards
  • Line-by-Line Dialogue Breakdown
  • Review Quizzes
  • Voice Recording Tools to Help Perfect Pronunciation
  • Teacher Feedback and Comments for Each Lesson
  • Czech Dictionary with Pronunciation
  • Free PDF Cheat Sheets
  • And Much More!

Armed with our growing collection of advanced learning tools, it’s truly a breeze to learn Czech alone and reach your goals!

Conclusion

Learning a language on your own is not only possible, it’s actually easier and more beneficial for you than traditional classroom instruction. In fact, when you learn Czech on your own you can study at your own pace, eliminate stress, and actually increase cognitive function.

CzechClass101 is the world’s most advanced online language learning system and a great resource to help you teach yourself a new language. With the world’s largest collection of HD audio and video lessons, more than 20 advanced learning tools, and customized “Learning Paths”, CzechClass101 makes learning a new language easier, more convenient, and less expensive than traditional classroom instruction.

And the best part is: With CzechClass101, you can study in bed, your car, or wherever you have a few spare minutes of time. Create your Free Lifetime Account now and get a FREE ebook to help “kickstart” your dream of learning a language on your own below!

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Language Learning Tips: How to Avoid Awkward Silences

Avoid Awkward Silences

Yes, even beginners can quickly learn conversational Czech well enough to carry on real conversations with native speakers. Of course, beginners won’t be able to carry a conversation the same way they could in their native language. But, just knowing a few tips like which questions to ask to keep a conversation going are all you need to speak and interact with real native speakers! But before we get to specific suggestions, let’s first take a closer look at how having real Czech conversations is so vital to your mastery of the language.

Learning to Carry a Conversation is Vital to Mastery of Any Language

Communicating with other people is the very point of language and conversation is almost second nature in our native tongue. For beginners or anyone learning a new language, conversations aren’t easy at all and even simple Czech greetings can be intimidating and awkward.

However, there are 3 vital reasons why you should learn conversational Czech as quickly as possible:

  • Avoid Awkward Silences: Nothing kills a conversation faster than long periods of awkward silence, so you need practice and specific strategies to avoid them.
  • Improve the Flow of Conversation to Make a Better Impression: When you know what to say to keep a conversation going, communication becomes much easier and you make a better impression on your listener.
  • Master the Language Faster: Nothing will help you learn to speak Czech faster and truly master the language than having real conversations with native speakers. Conversations quickly expose you to slang, cultural expressions, and vocabulary that force you to absorb and assimilate information faster than any educational setting—and that’s a great thing!

But how can you possibly have real conversations with real Czech people if you are just starting out?

3 Conversation Strategies for Beginners

Conversation

1. Ask Questions to Keep a Conversation Going

For beginners and even more advanced speakers, the key is to learn to ask questions to keep a conversation going. Of course, they can’t be just random questions or else you may confuse the listener. But, by memorizing a few key questions and the appropriate time to use them, you can easily carry a conversation with minimal vocabulary or experience. And remember, the more Czech conversations you have, the quicker you will learn and master the language!

2. Learn Core Vocabulary Terms as Quickly as Possible

You don’t need to memorize 10,000’s of words to learn conversational Czech. In fact, with just a couple hundred Czech words you could have a very basic Czech conversation. And by learning maybe 1,000-2,000 words, you could carry a conversation with a native speaker about current events, ordering in restaurants, and even getting directions.

3. Study Videos or Audio Lessons that You Can Play and Replay Again and Again

If you want to know how to carry a conversation in Czech, then you need exposure to native speakers—and the more the better. Ideally, studying video or audio lessons is ideal because they provide contextualized learning in your native language and you can play them again and again until mastery.

CzechClass101 Makes it Easier and More Convenient Than Ever to Learn Conversational Czech

Learning Czech

For more than 10 years, CzechClass101 has been helping students learn to speak Czech by creating the world’s most advanced online language learning system. Here are just a few of the specific features that will help you learn conversational Czech fast using our proven system:

  • The Largest Collection of HD Video & Audio Lessons from Real Czech Instructors: CzechClass101 instructors have created hundreds of video and audio lessons that you can play again and again. And the best part is: They don’t just teach you Czech vocabulary and grammar, they are designed to help you learn to speak Czech and teach you practical everyday topics like shopping, ordering, etc!
  • Pronunciation Tools: Use this feature to record and compare yourself with native speakers to quickly improve your pronunciation and fluency!
  • 2000 Common Czech Words: Also known as our Core List, these 2,000 words are all you need to learn to speak fluently and carry a conversation with a native speaker!

In all, more than 20 advanced learning tools help you quickly build vocabulary and learn how to carry a conversation with native speakers—starting with your very first lesson.

Conclusion

Although it may seem intimidating for a beginner, the truth is that it is very easy to learn conversational Czech. By learning a few core vocabulary terms and which questions to ask to keep a conversation going, just a little practice and exposure to real Czech conversations or lessons is all it really takes. CzechClass101 has created the world’s largest online collection of video and audio lessons by real instructors plus loads of advanced tools to help you learn to speak Czech and carry a conversation quickly.

Act now and we’ll also include a list of the most commonly used questions to keep a conversation going so you can literally get started immediately!

5 Steps to the Ultimate Czech Immersion Experience at Home

Czech Immersion Experience

Immersion is often hailed as the most efficient and effective way to learn a foreign language. In many ways it’s true. With all the language learning methods out there nothing else comes close to having to think and interact with your environment in the language you’re learning.

Unfortunately though, most language learners wrongly assume that the only way to experience language immersion is to pack up and move to a foreign country. But not everyone can afford to spend a summer in the Czech Republic just to learn a foreign language.

Luckily, there are other ways to immerse yourself in Czech. These method are less obvious, but they are effective. In this post we take a look at five steps you can take for the ultimate Czech immersion experience, without quitting your job and catching a plane.

Digital World

1) Make your digital world a Czech one

Technology is an indispensable part of modern life. We interact with phones, computers, tablets, and other electronic devices throughout the day. Why not take these interactions and use them to practice your Czech? Most devices give you the option of switching the language of the operating system. Switching your phone or laptop interface to Czech won’t make you fluent, but it will help you engage with the language in a very practical way.

Another way to make your digital life a Czech one is to check which sites you use on a daily basis, and use them in Czech also. A great example of this is the Czech version of Google. This version of the Google will allow you to search in Czech and is more likely to give results in the language as well.

You can use popular social networks like Facebook in Czech. You can even go to Czech news sites for your fill of global news. You do like podcasts? Trying listening to a couple Czech podcasts too.

Conversation

2) Write out a speech or conversation in Czech

A surefire way to increase your ability in a foreign language is to write out a mock conversation or speech in that language. Pretend you have to give a speech on one of your favorite topics (it could be anything from sports, hobbies, or even your favorite movie genre).

Now take some time to write a out your fictitious speech. Inevitably you will hit some roadblocks as you encounter words you know in your native English, but don’t know in Czech. When you get stuck, research the words you don’t know (you can look them up or perhaps ask a language partner or tutor). This is a highly effective and practical way to increase your vocabulary, and it will help you practice thinking in the Czech language.

Writing a long connected train of thoughts exposes the gaps and weaknesses in your Czech. Once you know what these are, you are free to practice them and use them to continue on with your Czech speech.

This is also a great way to learn new worlds in the context of your entire speech. I always say, “content is king when you’re learning a language”, and it’s true. Learning words in the context of other words and sentences helps you surmise what new words mean. It also helps you get comfortable with how these words are practically used. Not to mention context helps you remember and recall new information more easily.

3) Practice with native Czech speakers

There are a lot of great learning resources out for anyone learning Czech. However nothing quite comes close to practicing the language with a real person. If you live in or around a large metropolitan area there’s a chance that there are some Czech speakers nearby.

Check and see if your area has any local language exchanges or language speaking groups. You’re likely to find a native Czech speaker there. If not a native you might be able to find someone who knows Czech as a second language. If you can’t make a connection locally you can search online. Just as there are language exchanges in the real world, there also online ones (most of which are free).

4) Connect with other Czech learners

Native speakers aren’t the only Czech speakers who can aid you on your language learning journey. Practicing with other Czech learners is also helpful. Don’t worry if you practice with someone who has a higher or lower level in the language than you.

If you’re the more advanced learner you can learn a lot by teaching someone else. As you help someone else understand difficult words or grammatical concepts you’ll find that you start to better understand them yourself.

If your learning partner has a higher level in Czech, they can be the one to help you overcome the hurdles you encounter as a beginner. After all what better way to to learn Czech than from someone who, as a language learner, has been in your shoes?

Self Reward

5) Reward yourself in Czech

At the end of a busy day we all love a little relaxation and me-time. One of the most enjoyable and effective ways to develop your language skills is to kick back and enjoy the language while doing leisure activities.

Whether it’s listening to music, watching a movie or tv show, reading a book, or even enjoying a good online video binge, even spending just an extra thirty minutes a day doing something you love in the Czech language can yield some serious long term results.

If you’re a beginner start which more basic content. You might have to start out listening to simple songs or even watching children’s shows. After awhile though you’ll be able to dive into the meatier and more engaging stuff as your proficiency increases.

Learning a foreign language doesn’t mean you have to spend your days straining over grammar rules or textbooks. Any way that you can take your learning off the page and make it more enjoyable will help you learn faster.

Final thoughts

Immersion is powerful way to learn a foreign language, and now more than ever the immersion experience isn’t limited to just world travelers.

With a little creativity, the right resources, and the internet you can experience the Czech language without ever having to leave your hometown!