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Essential Vocabulary for Life Events in Czech

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What is the most defining moment you will face this year? From memories that you immortalize in a million photographs, to days you never wish to remember, one thing’s for certain: big life events change you. The great poet, Bukowski, said, “We are here to laugh at the odds and live our lives so well, that death will tremble to take us.” The older I get, the more I agree with him!

Talking about significant events in our lives is part of every person’s journey, regardless of creed or culture. If you’re planning to stay in Czech Republic for more than a quick visit, you’re sure to need at least a few ‘life events’ phrases that you can use. After all, many of these are shared experiences, and it’s generally expected that we will show up with good manners and warm wishes.

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Table of Contents

  1. Life Events
  2. Marriage Proposal Lines
  3. Talking About Age
  4. Conclusion

1. Life Events

Do you know how to say “Happy New Year” in Czech? Well, the New Year is a pretty big deal that the whole world is in on! We celebrate until midnight, make mindful resolutions, and fill the night sky with the same happy words in hundreds of languages. No doubt, then, that you’ll want to know how to say it like a local!

Big life events are not all about fun times, though. Real life happens even when you’re traveling, and certain terminology will be very helpful to know. From talking about your new job to wishing your neighbors “Merry Christmas” in Czech, here at CzechClass101, we’ve put together just the right vocabulary and phrases for you.

1- Birthday – narozeniny

If you’re like me, any excuse to bring out a pen and scribble a note is a good one. When there’s a birthday, even better: hello, handwriting!

Your Czech friend will love hearing you wish them a “Happy birthday” in Czech, but how much more will they appreciate a thoughtful written message? Whether you write it on their Facebook wall or buy a cute card, your effort in Czech is sure to get them smiling! Write it like this:

Všechno nejlepší

Older Woman Blowing Out Candles on a Birthday Cake Surrounded by Friends.

Now that you know the words, I challenge you to put them to music and sing your own “Happy birthday” song in Czech! It’s not impossible to figure out even more lyrics, once you start discovering the language from scratch.

2- Buy – nakupovat

If there’s a special occasion, you might want to buy somebody a gift. As long as you’ve checked out Czech etiquette on gift-giving (do a Google search for this!), it will be a lovely gesture. If you’re not sure what to buy, how about the awesome and universally-appealing gift of language? That’s a gift that won’t stop giving!

Two Women at a Counter in a Bookstore, One Buying a Book

3- Retire – odejít do důchodu

If you’re planning to expand your mind and retire in Czech Republic, you can use this word to tell people why you seem to be on a perpetual vacation!

Retirement is also a great time to learn a new language, don’t you think? And you don’t have to do it alone! These days it’s possible to connect to a vibrant learning community at the click of a button. The added benefit of a Daily Dose of Language is that it keeps your brain cells alive and curious about the world. After all, it’s never too late to realize those long-ignored dreams of traveling the globe…

4- Graduation – promoce

When attending a graduation ceremony in Czech Republic, be prepared for a lot of formal language! It will be a great opportunity to listen carefully and see if you can pick up differences from the everyday Czech you hear.

Lecturer or University Dean Congratulating and Handing Over Graduation Certificate to a Young Man on Graduation Day.

5- Promotion – povýšení

Next to vacation time, receiving a promotion is the one career highlight almost everyone looks forward to. And why wouldn’t you? Sure, it means more responsibility, but it also means more money and benefits and – the part I love most – a change of scenery! Even something as simple as looking out a new office window would boost my mood.

6- Anniversary – výročí

Some anniversaries we anticipate with excitement, others with apprehension. They are days marking significant events in our lives that can be shared with just one person, or with a whole nation. Whether it’s a special day for you and a loved one, or for someone else you know, this word is crucial to know if you want to wish them a happy anniversary in Czech.

7- Funeral – pohřeb

We tend to be uncomfortable talking about funerals in the west, but it’s an important conversation for families to have. Around the world, there are many different customs and rituals for saying goodbye to deceased loved ones – some vastly different to our own. When traveling in Czech Republic, if you happen to find yourself the unwitting observer of a funeral, take a quiet moment to appreciate the cultural ethos; even this can be an enriching experience for you.

8- Travel – cestovat

Travel – my favorite thing to do! Everything about the experience is thrilling and the best cure for boredom, depression, and uncertainty about your future. You will surely be forever changed, fellow traveler! But you already know this, don’t you? Well, now that you’re on the road to total Czech immersion, I hope you’ve downloaded our IOS apps and have your Nook Book handy to keep yourself entertained on those long bus rides.

Young Female Tourist with a Backpack Taking a Photo of the Arc de Triomphe

9- Graduate – promovat

If you have yet to graduate from university, will you be job-hunting in Czech Republic afterward? Forward-looking companies sometimes recruit talented students who are still in their final year. Of course, you could also do your final year abroad as an international student – an amazing experience if you’d love to be intellectually challenged and make a rainbow of foreign friends!

10- Wedding – svatba

One of the most-loved traditions that humans have thought up, which you’ll encounter anywhere in the world, is a wedding. With all that romance in the air and months spent on preparations, a wedding is typically a feel-good affair. Two people pledge their eternal love to each other, ladies cry, single men look around for potential partners, and everybody has a happy day of merrymaking.

Ah, but how diverse we are in our expression of love! You will find more wedding traditions around the world than you can possibly imagine. From reciting love quotes to marrying a tree, the options leave no excuse to be boring!

Married Couple During Reception, Sitting at Their Table While a Young Man Gives a Wedding Speech

11- Move – stěhovat se

I love Czech Republic, but I’m a nomad and tend to move around a lot, even within one country. What are the biggest emotions you typically feel when moving house? The experts say moving is a highly stressful event, but I think that depends on the circumstances. Transitional periods in our lives are physically and mentally demanding, but changing your environment is also an exciting adventure that promises new tomorrows!

12- Be born – narodit se

I was not born in 1993, nor was I born in Asia. I was born in the same year as Aishwarya Rai, Akon, and Monica Lewinsky, and on the same continent as Freddy Mercury. When and where were you born? More importantly – can you say it in Czech?

13- Get a job – najít práci

The thought of looking for a job in a new country can be daunting, but English speakers are in great demand in Czech Republic – you just have to do some research, make a few friends and get out there! Also, arming yourself with a few Czech introductions that you can both say and write will give you a confidence boost. For example, can you write your name in Czech?

Group of People in Gear that Represent a Number of Occupations.

14- Die – zemřít

Death is a universal experience and the final curtain on all other life events. How important is it, then, to fully live before we die? If all you have is a passport, a bucket list, and a willingness to learn some lingo, you can manifest those dreams!

15- Home – domov

If home is where the heart is, then my home is on a jungle island completely surrounded by the turquoise ocean. Right now, though, home is an isolation room with a view of half a dry palm tree and a tangle of telephone wires.

If you’re traveling to Czech Republic for an extended stay, you’ll soon be moving into a new home quite unlike anything you’ve experienced before!

Large, Double-Story House with Lit Windows.

16- Job – zaměstnání

What job do you do? Does it allow you much time for travel, or for working on this fascinating language that has (so rightfully) grabbed your attention? Whatever your job, you are no doubt contributing to society in a unique way. If you’re doing what you love, you’re already on the road to your dream. If not, just remember that every single task is one more skill to add to your arsenal. With that attitude, your dream job is coming!

17- Birth – narození

Random question: do you know the birth rate of Czech Republic?

If you’re lucky enough to be invited to see a friend’s baby just after they are born, you’ll have all my respect and all my envy. There is nothing cuter! Depending on which part of the country you’re in, you may find yourself bearing witness to some pretty unexpected birth customs. Enjoy this privilege!

Crying Newborn Baby Held By a Doctor or Nurse in a Hospital Theatre

18- Engaged – zasnoubit se

EE Cummings said, “Lovers alone wear sunlight,” and I think that’s most true at the moment she says “yes.” Getting engaged is something young girls dream of with stars in their eyes, and it truly is a magical experience – from the proposal, to wearing an engagement ring, to the big reveal!

In the world of Instagram, there’s no end to the antics as imaginative couples try more and more outrageous ways to share their engagement with the world. I love an airport flashmob, myself, but I’d rather be proposed to on a secluded beach – salt, sand, and all!

Engagement customs around the world vary greatly, and Czech Republic is no exception when it comes to interesting traditions. Learning their unique romantic ways will inspire you for when your turn comes.

Speaking of romance, do you know how to say “Happy Valentine’s Day” in Czech?

19- Marry – brát se

The one you marry will be the gem on a shore full of pebbles. They will be the one who truly mirrors your affection, shares your visions for the future, and wants all of you – the good, the bad and the inexplicable.

From thinking up a one-of-a-kind wedding, to having children, to growing old together, finding a twin flame to share life with is quite an accomplishment! Speaking of which…

2. Marriage Proposal Lines

Marriage Proposal Lines

Ah, that heart-stopping moment when your true love gets down on one knee to ask for your hand in marriage, breathlessly hoping that you’ll say “Yes!” If you haven’t experienced that – well, it feels pretty darn good, is all I can say! If you’re the one doing the asking, though, you’ve probably had weeks of insomnia agonizing over the perfect time, location and words to use.

Man on His Knee Proposing to a Woman on a Bridge.

How much more care should be taken if your love is from a different culture to yours? Well, by now you know her so well, that most of it should be easy to figure out. As long as you’ve considered her personal commitment to tradition, all you really need is a few words from the heart. Are you brave enough to say them in Czech?

3. Talking About Age

Talking about Age

Part of the wonder of learning a new language is having the ability to strike up simple conversations with strangers. Asking about age in this context feels natural, as your intention is to practice friendly phrases – just be mindful of their point of view!

When I was 22, I loved being asked my age. Nowadays, if someone asks, I say, “Well, I’ve just started my fifth cat life.” Let them ponder that for a while.

In Czech Republic, it’s generally not desirable to ask an older woman her age for no good reason, but chatting about age with your peers is perfectly normal. Besides, you have to mention your birthday if you want to be thrown a birthday party!

4. Conclusion

Well, there you have it! With so many great new Czech phrases to wish people with, can you think of someone who has a big event coming up? If you want to get even more creative, CzechClass101 has much to inspire you with – come and check it out! Here’s just some of what we have on offer at CzechClass101:

  • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Czech with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account – for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Czech dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about CzechClass101…!
  • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
  • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters, as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. You can have your very own Czech teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to – what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
  • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Czech word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Czech level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

Learning a new language can only enrich your life, and could even open doors towards great opportunities! So don’t wonder if you’ll regret enrolling in CzechClass101. It’s the most fun, easy way to learn Czech.

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Talk About the Weather in Czech Like a Native

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Did you know that every minute of the day, one billion tons of rain falls on the earth? Hard to believe, considering the climate crisis! Of course, all that rain is not equally shared across the planet.

So, would you mention this fascinating fact to your new Czech acquaintance? Well, small talk about local weather is actually a great conversation-starter. Everyone cares about the weather and you’re sure to hear a few interesting opinions! Seasons can be quite unpredictable these days and nobody knows the peculiarities of a region better than the locals.

CzechClass101 will equip you with all the weather vocabulary you need to plan your next adventure. The weather can even be an important discussion that influences your adventure plans. After all, you wouldn’t want to get caught on an inflatable boat with a two-horsepower motor in Hurricane Horrendous!

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Table of Contents

  1. Talking about the weather in Czech Republic
  2. Words for the first day of spring
  3. Do You Know the Essential Summer Vocabulary?
  4. Must-Know Autumn vocabulary
  5. Winter
  6. CzechClass101 can prepare you for any season.

1. Talking about the weather in Czech Republic

Talking About Weather

If you’re like me, your day’s activity plan is likely to begin with a strong local coffee and a chat about what the sky is doing. After all, being prepared could be the difference between an amazing day and a miserable one! Luckily, it’s not difficult to comment on Czech weather – just start with these simple words and phrases.

1- The rain is falling on the street – Na ulici padá děšť.

Watercolor artists, take out your paints! You might not be able to venture out on foot today, but just embrace the rain as part of your Czech experience. When the rain stops, the air will be clean and colours vibrant.

2- The snow has covered everything – Sníh pokryl všechno.

A fresh blanket of snow is irresistibly beautiful. Pull on your boots and beanie, and leave your tracks in this foreign landscape. Don’t resist the urge to build a snowman – you need this!

3- Fluffy cloud – Načechrané mraky

When you’re waiting for a warm beach day, fluffy white clouds in a blue sky are a good sign. Don’t forget your sunscreen, as clouds will intensify the UV rays hitting your skin.

Fluffy White Cloud in Clear Blue Sky

4- The water froze on the glass – Voda zamrzla na skle.

Night temperatures can get chilly and might freeze the condensation on your windows. A good way to clear them up is with warm salt water.

5- The heavy rain could cause flash flooding – Tento silný déšť by mohl způsobit povodně.

If you’re visiting Czech Republic in the wet season, it’s important to stay informed when heavy rain sets in, so keep an eye on the weather radar. Avoid river activities and rather spend this time making a home-cooked meal and brushing up on your Czech weather words.

Heavy Rain in a Park

6- Flood – Povodeň

If you do get caught in a flood, your destination should no longer be ‘home’, but the nearest high ground.

7- The typhoon has hit – phrase

Not all countries experience typhoons, but you need to know when to prepare for one! It will be very scary if you’ve never experienced one before. Your local neighbours are the best people to advise you on where to take shelter, as they’ve been doing it for generations. Be sure to get the low-down at the first sign of rough weather!

8- Check the weather report before going sailing – Než půjdete plachtit, zkontrolujte předpověď počasí.

When planning an outdoor activity, especially on a body of water, always be prepared for a change in the weather. Ask your hotel receptionist or neighbour where you can get a reliable daily weather report, and don’t forget your sweater!

Two Men on Sailboat

9- Today’s weather is sunny with occasional clouds – Dnes je slunečno s občasnýmy mraky.

Sunny weather is the dream when traveling in Czech Republic! Wake up early, pack the hats and sunblock and go and experience the terrain, sights and beautiful spots. You’ll be rewarded with happy vibes all around.

10- A rainy day – deštivý den

Remember when you said you’d save the Czech podcasts for a rainy day? Now’s that day!

11- Scenic rainbow – scénická duha

The best part about the rain is that you can look forward to your first rainbow in Czech Republic. There’s magic in that!

12- Flashes of lightning can be beautiful, but are very dangerous – Záblesky blesku mohou být krásné, ale velmi nebezpečné.

Lightning is one of the most fascinating weather phenomena you can witness without really being in danger – at least if you’re sensible and stay indoors! Did you know that lightning strikes the earth 40-50 times per second? Fortunately, not all countries experience heavy electric storms!

Electric Storm

13- 25 degrees Celsius – 25 stupňů Celsia

Asking a local what the outside temperature will be is another useful question for planning your day. It’s easy if you know the Czech term for ‘degrees Celsius’.

14- Water freezes at thirty-two (32) degrees Fahrenheit – Voda zamrzá ve třiceti dvou (32) stupních Farenheita.

Although the Fahrenheit system has been replaced by Celsius in almost all countries, it’s still used in the US and a few other places. Learn this phrase in Czech in case one of your companions develops a raging fever.

15- Clear sky – jasno

Clear skies mean you’ll probably want to get the camera out and capture some nature shots – not to mention the great sunsets you’ll have later on. Twilight can lend an especially magical quality to a landscape on a clear sky day, when the light is not filtered through clouds.

Hikers on Mountain with Clear Sky

16- Light drizzle – lehké poprchávání

Days when it’s drizzling are perfect for taking in the cultural offerings of Czech Republic. You could go to the mall and watch a Czech film, visit museums and art galleries, explore indoor markets or even find the nearest climbing wall. Bring an umbrella!

17- Temperature – teplota

Because of the coronavirus, many airports are conducting temperature screening on passengers. Don’t worry though – it’s just a precaution. Your temperature might be taken with a no-touch thermometer, which measures infrared energy coming off the body.

18- Humid – vlhko

I love humid days, but then I’m also a water baby and I think the two go
together like summer and rain. Find a pool or a stream to cool off in – preferably in the shade!

Humidity in Tropical Forest

19- With low humidity the air feels dry – Při nízké vlhkosti se vduch zdá suchý.

These are the best days to go walking the hills and vales. Just take at least one Czech friend with you so you don’t get lost!

20- The wind is really strong – Vítr je opravdu silný.

A strong wind blows away the air pollution and is very healthy in that respect. Just avoid the mountain trails today, unless you fancy being blown across the continent like a hot air balloon.

21- It’s very windy outside – větrný den

Wind! My least favourite weather condition. Of course, if you’re a kitesurfer, a windy day is what you’ve been waiting for!

Leaves and Umbrella in the Wind

22- Wet roads can ice over when the temperature falls below freezing – Vlhké silnice mohou zamrznout, pokud teplota klesne pod bod mrazu.

The roads will be dangerous in these conditions, so please don’t take chances. The ice will thaw as soon as the sun comes out, so be patient!

23- Today is very muggy – Dnes je velmi dusno.

Muggy days make your skin feel sticky and sap your energy. They’re particular to high humidity. Cold shower, anyone? Ice vest? Whatever it takes to feel relief from the humidity!

24- Fog – mlha

Not a great time to be driving, especially in unknown territory, but keep your fog lights on and drive slowly.

Fog on a Pond with Ducks

25- Hurricane – hurikán

Your new Czech friends will know the signs, so grab some food and candles and prepare for a night of staying warm and chatting about wild weather in Czech Republic.

Palm Trees in a Hurricane

26- Tornado – tornádo

If you hear these words, it will probably be obvious already that everyone is preparing for the worst! Definitely do whatever your accommodation hosts tell you to do when a tornado is expected.

27- It’s cloudy today – Dnes je zataženo.

While there won’t be any stargazing tonight, the magnificent clouds over Czech Republic will make impressive photographs. Caption them in Czech to impress your friends back home!

Cloudy Weather on Beach with Beach Huts

28- Below freezing temperatures – teploty pod bodem mrazu

When the temperature is below freezing, why not take an Uber and go shopping for some gorgeous Czech winter gear?

Woman with Winter Gear in Freezing Weather

29- Wind chill is how cold it really feels outside – Efektivní teplota znamená, jakou zimu skutečně venku cítíme.

Wind doesn’t change the ambient temperature of the air, it just changes your body temperature, so the air will feel colder to you than it actually is. Not all your Czech friends will know that, though, so learn this Czech phrase to sound really smart!

30- Water freezes at zero (0) degrees Celsius – Voda zamrzá při nula (0) stupních Celsia.

If you’re near a lake, frozen water is good news! Forgot your ice skates? Don’t despair – find out where you can hire some. Be cautious, though: the ice needs to be at least four inches thick for safe skating. Personally, I just slide around on frozen lakes in my boots!

Thermometer Below Freezing Point

31- Waiting to clear up – čekat na vyjasnění

Waiting for the weather to clear up so you can go exploring is frustrating, let’s be honest. That’s why you should always travel with two things: a scintillating novel and your Czech Nook Book.

32- Avoid the extreme heat – vyhýbejte se extrémnímu horku

Is the heat trying to kill you? Unless you’re a hardened heatwave hero, definitely avoid activity, stay hydrated and drink electrolytes. Loose cotton or linen garb is the way to go!

Hand Holding a Melting Ice Cream

33- Morning frost – ranní mráz

Frost is water vapour that has turned to ice crystals and it happens when the earth cools so much in the night, that it gets colder than the air above it. Winter is coming!

34- Rain shower – dešťová přeháňka

Rain showers are typically brief downpours that drench the earth with a good drink of water.

35- In the evening it will become cloudy and cold – Večer se udělá zataženo a zima.

When I hear this on the Czech weather channel, I buy a bottle of wine (red, of course) and wood for the fireplace. A cold and cloudy evening needs its comforts!

Snow in the Park at Night

36- Severe thunderstorm – prudká bouře

Keep an eye on the Czech weather maps if it looks like a big storm is coming, so you’ll be well-informed.

37- Ice has formed on the window – Na okně se udělala námraza.

You could try this phrase out on the hotel’s helpful cleaning staff, or fix the problem yourself. Just add a scoop or two of salt to a spray bottle of water – that should work!

38- Large hailstones – velké kroupy

As a kid, I found hail crazy exciting. Not so much now – especially if I’m on the road and large hailstones start pummeling my windscreen!

Large Hailstones on a Wooden Floor

39- Rolling thunder – zvlněný blesk

The rumble of rolling thunder is that low-volume, ominous background sound that goes on for some time. It’s strangely exciting if you’re safely in your hotel room; it could either suddenly clear up, or escalate to a storm.

40- Sleet – déšť se sněhem

Sleet is tiny hard pieces of ice made from a mixture of rain and melted snow that froze. It can be messy, but doesn’t cause major damage the way hail does. Pretty cool to know this word in Czech!

2. Words for the first day of spring

You know the feeling: your heart skips a beat when you wake up and spring has sprung! Spring will reward you with new blossoms everywhere, birdsong in the air, kittens being born in the neighborhood and lovely views when you hit the trails. Pack a picnic and ask a new Czech friend to show you the more natural sights. Don’t forget a light sweater and a big smile. This is the perfect time to practice some Czech spring words!

Spring Vocabulary

3. Do You Know the Essential Summer Vocabulary?

Summer! Who doesn’t love that word? It conjures up images of blue skies, tan skin, vacations at the beach and cruising down the coast in an Alfa Romeo, sunglasses on and the breeze in your hair. Of course, in Czech Republic there are many ways to enjoy the summer – it all depends on what you love to do. One thing’s for sure: you will have opportunities to make friends, go on picnics, sample delicious local ice-cream and maybe even learn to sing some Czech songs. It’s up to you! Sail into Czech summer with this summer vocab list, and you’ll blend in with ease.

Four Adults Playing on the Beach in the Sand

4. Must-Know Autumn vocabulary

Victoria Ericksen said, “If a year was tucked inside of a clock, then autumn would be the magic hour,” and I agree. Who can resist the beauty of fall foliage coloring the Czech landscape? Birds prepare to migrate; travelers prepare to arrive for the best weather in Czech Republic.

The autumnal equinox marks the moment the Sun crosses the celestial equator, making day and night almost equal in length. The cool thing about this event is that the moon gets really bright – the ‘harvest moon’, as it’s traditionally known.

So, as much as the change of season brings more windy and rainy days, it also brings celebration. Whether you honor Thanksgiving, Halloween or the Moon Festival, take some time to color your vocabulary with these Czech autumn words.

Autumn Phrases

5. Winter

Winter is the time the natural world slows down to rest and regroup. I’m a summer girl, but there are fabulous things about winter that I really look forward to. For one, it’s the only season I get to accessorize with my gorgeous winter gloves and snug down coat!

Then, of course, there’s ice skating, holiday decorations and bonfires. As John Steinbeck said, “What good is the warmth of summer, without the cold of winter to give it sweetness?” Get ready for the cold season with our list of essential Winter words!

Skier Sitting in the Snow

6. CzechClass101 can prepare you for any season.

Now that you know how to inquire and comment on the weather in Czech Republic, you
can confidently plan your weather-ready travel itinerary. How about this for an idea: the next
time you’re sitting in a Czech street café, try asking someone local this question:

“Do you think the weather will stay like this for a few days?” If you loved learning these cool Czech weather phrases with us, why not take it a step further and add to your repertoire? CzechClass101 is here to help!

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The Czech Calendar: Talking About Dates in Czech

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Did you know there are many different types of calendars?

As you probably know – a calendar is a system of organizing days in weeks and months for specific purposes, according to Wikipedia.

Worldwide, most countries use the Gregorian calendar. Some just work on the same framework, meaning that time is divided into units based on the earth’s movement around the sun – the “solar calendar”. Other calendars keep time by observing the moon’s movements, a combination of the moon and the sun’s movements, and seasons.

Through CzechClass101, you can learn all about this and so much more! Our themed, culturally relevant lessons are skillfully designed so you can do your planning perfectly for a holiday or a date.

Having a good plan for a visit or a trip is like studying well for an exam. You’re just so much better prepared! For that, you could well need specific phrases to plan around appointments and such, especially on business trips. Make sure to use the charts we provide here with the days of the week in Czech, as well as the months in Czech to navigate your way as you plan. Great resources!

Also – always remember to have fun!

Table of Contents

  1. Why Will It Help To Know How To Talk About Dates in Czech?
  2. Talking About your Plans
  3. Can CzechClass101 Help You In Other Ways Too?

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1. Why Will It Help To Know How To Talk About Dates in Czech?

Days of the Week

Well, that’s not a difficult question to answer. No matter why you’re travelling, it would be best to at least know the names of days and months in Czech. You don’t want to miss your flight or an appointment because you confused “pátek” (Friday) with “sobota” (Saturday)! Or maybe you planned a holiday for “červenec” (July), but you booked a flight for “červen” (June) by accident!

Avoid this confusion by learning the Czech calendar before you leave.

Now, as promised, the 15 phrases to help you make and discuss plans.

2. Talking About your Plans

Months of the Year

Perhaps you’re working in Czech Republic, or maybe you’re enjoying a prolonged holiday. Fabulous! Memorize these phrases so you can be sure to successfully negotiate meetings, appointments, dates, events, the list goes on!

1. Co děláte tento víkend?

“What are you doing this weekend?”

This question is usually a preamble to inviting someone somewhere. Given that it’s over the weekend, it probably means a casual get-together or another social event. (But not necessarily! A manager or boss could also ask this for entirely different reasons.)

It’s a handy phrase to know when you’ve made Czech or expat friends in the country. Or, be the one doing the inviting. Then train your ear to learn the following phrases so you can understand the response.

2. Tento víkend budu cestovat.

“I am traveling this weekend.”

This could be a reply if you’re not available because you’re doing other fun stuff.

No matter why you are visiting Czech Republic, do take the time to explore the country! It’s beautiful and it has so many wonderful, interesting spots ready to be visited.

Couple at booking in Desk

3. Zůstanu doma.

“I am planning to stay at home.”

Maybe you feel unwell, but don’t want to give too much information? Or maybe you have work to do? Perhaps you just need some quiet gardening time…it doesn’t matter. This response is polite and honest without oversharing.

It could also be a slightly open-ended response, depending on how you deliver it. Because hey, being home could still mean your plans are flexible, right?

That said – depending on your relationship with the inviter, nuances like these will probably not be so apparent in a foreign culture. So, best to use this excuse for declining an invitation only if you are truly set on staying in.

Woman Doing Gardening

4. Tento týden nemám čas.

“This week I am busy.”

Another polite phrase that gives a reason for declining an invitation but without oversharing details.

Don’t decline too many invitations, though! You don’t want people to think that you’re too busy to hang out with them. They will stop inviting you out, and you know how the saying goes – all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy…! Being social is good for the soul.

5. Mám zítra volno.

“I am free tomorrow.”

Yay! Perhaps you were approached by that person and they asked about your availability for a date. This would be a fine reply. Not too eager, but still indicating that you’re interested.

Or maybe you’re just replying to a colleague or manager’s request for a meeting. Polite, honest and clear.

Alternatively, you’re just busy right now, and plans are not going the way they were…well, planned. Compromise is a lovely thing! And this phrase sounds just like that.

Use it to indicate that you want to accommodate an invitation or the inviter’s plans, despite your current unavailability. Only if you are really free, of course.

6. Můžeme to změnit?

“Can we reschedule this?”

So, life happened and you are unable to meet obligations or attend a planned meeting. This is a suitable question to ask if you wish to indicate your willingness to still engage with whatever is on the table.

Obviously you should (ideally) not ask to reschedule a party or big meeting! (Unless you’re the boss or it’s your own party, of course.) But if there’s reasonable wiggle room regarding arrangements, then this one’s your question.

Business Man Sitting with Schedule

7. Na konci měsíce budu mít dost času.

“I will have enough time at the end of the month.”

A go-to phrase when events or activities are likely to take up a lot of your time, such as going away for a weekend, spending the day at a local market, or writing your manager’s quarterly report (with 20 flow-charts in Powerpoint) – anything that won’t only take an hour or two.

8. Kdy vám to nejlépe vyhovuje?

“When is the best time that suits you?”

Remember phrase #5? That was a possible reply to this question. Asked by your crush, very possibly! Or, it could be asked by any other person for any other reason, doesn’t matter.

If this is addressed to you, it usually means that the person respects your time and schedule, which is a good thing. It probably also means that their own schedule is flexible, another good thing.

This is also a polite question to ask when a manager or senior colleague wants to meet with you. Let them decide on the time, and be as accommodating as possible. This attitude shows respect for seniority – good for career building. (Within reason, of course. You don’t need to postpone your wedding or your paid-up holiday to Australia because your manager wants to see you.)

Screen Tablet Hotel

9. Je toto datum v pořádku?

“Is this date OK with you?”

But – if the other party insists that you choose a time for a meeting, appointment, or date etc., then do so! Respond with this nice, somewhat casual question that leaves space for negotiation, but only needs a simple reply.

Suitable for friends, and casual acquaintances and colleagues.

10. Máte v ten den čas?

“Are you available on that day?”

This is the a-bit-more-formal version of the previous question. Again, it has room for negotiation, but only needs a simple response – nice and neat!

Maybe this is the go-to question when you’re addressing your seniors at work, or a person much older than you.

11. Můžeme to udělat co nejdříve?

“Can we do it as soon as possible?”

This question has an urgency to it that should preferably be responded to with the same. A simple reply will be good – yes or no. Less negotiable, this is still polite because it’s a question that gives you a choice.

But stand ready with one of the phrases in this article to help tie down a time and date!

Couple Getting Engaged on a Bridge

12. Jsem k dispozici každý večer.

“I’m available every evening”

If you’re going to reply with this phrase, context is everything.

– If it’s your manager asking you to put in a bit of overtime, and you are available to – great reply! When deadlines are tight and everybody is stressing, your willingness to go the extra mile can only improve your relationship with your boss.

(Still, no need to be a doormat! If you get asked to work overtime too often, or if everyone else is goofing around while you have to graft, then re-evaluate the situation. And if you feel you’re being exploited a bit, don’t stress! Equip yourself with the diplomatic, yet assertive responses right in this article.)

– If it’s an old friend or longtime significant other asking to hang out – good reply. You know one another and appearances don’t matter any longer.

– If it’s a new crush who just asked when you’d be available for a date – stop. Not such a great reply. Tone down a bit! “Interested but not overly eager” is what you’re going for here.

Refer back to response #5, or use a counter-question, such as #1. Whatever suits you.

But if they – or anyone else – invite you to scale the Himalayas with them, then the next phrase will probably be the only sane response!

Mountaineer in Snow

13. Potřebuji to naplánovat dopředu.

“I need to plan this well in advance.”

So, as said under #9, perhaps you’re invited to join someone conquer the Himalayas.

Or your company manager wants you to plan the Party that Tops All Year-End Parties Forever.

Simply – if you get asked to do something that you know will need a lot of thorough planning, this is a good phrase to respond with.

It’s an assertive phrase that demonstrates two things regarding your attitude:

a) That you know your own abilities, and respect your own schedule.
b) That your respect other people’s time and schedule too.

Then just be sure to actually do that planning well in advance!

14. Musíme najít další datum.

“We need to find another date.”

So, you’re in negotiations regarding a date.

This is an assertive statement that should probably not be used with a “My way or the highway” attitude.

That stuff only works in the movies – think sharp-tongued Samuel L. Jackson. Or fierce Kristen Stewart. Yea, they can be scary, so tone down that tone.

Also, be mindful that fickle people who change plans all the time don’t keep friends! Taking others’ needs into consideration, while simultaneously having your way is a delicate art that takes proper cultivation. Use this phrase sparingly – we have better ones here to negotiate with.

Rock Concert Hands in the Air

Of course, if your planned trip to the dentist falls on the same day as the only Billie Eilish concert close by…well, priorities are priorities. Feel free to call the dentist with this phrase. Or even better, use the next one.

15. Nemůžu to udělat v ten den.

“I cannot do it on that day.”

This is the low-key-but-still-firm cousin of the previous phrase. You’re stating a personal fact, and depending on your tone, this can be as non-negotiable as you prefer.

Again, only use this when you really mean it, if you’re visiting Czech Republic or any other foreign country.

So, that’s it, folks! Which phrase did you find the most helpful? Let us know in the comments!

3. Can CzechClass101 Help You In Other Ways Too?

Numbers

Well yes, of course!

We think you will find these phrases easy to use when talking about dates and months in Czech. But knowing how to employ them properly could help you avoid sticky situations!

CzechClass101 is uniquely geared to help you with this and so much more.

This InnovativeLanguage.com initiative is one of many online language-learning courses. With us, you’ll find it easy and fun to learn a new language, and here are a few reasons why:

  • Immediately upon enrollment, you’ll receive hundreds of well-designed lessons to get you going.
  • Watch superb recordings of native Czech speakers in cool slide-shows – the easy way to practice till you sound just like a native speaker yourself!
  • Also immediately upon enrollment, you’ll get access to a huge library of free resources! These include extensive, theme-based Vocabulary Lists and a Word of the Day List (For free, hot bargains!) These alone are sure to give your vocab-learning boxing gloves.
  • You’ll also immediately be able to use an excellent and free Czech online dictionary. Necessary for quick, handy translations, no matter where you find yourself.
  • For the serious learner, there are numerous enrollment upgrades available, one of which offers you a personal, online Czech host. Allow us to hold your hand and support you in your learning!

If you’re serious about mastering Czech easily yet correctly, CzechClass101 is definitely one of, if not the best, online language learning platforms available. Talking about your plans or dates in Czech need not ever spoil your stay.

So, hurry up—enroll today!

Learn How to Talk About Your Family in Czech

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Did you know that only some reptiles and birds don’t parent their offspring? Except for crocodiles, all reptiles (and one family of bird species called megapodes) hatch from eggs and grow up alone, without any family.

The rest of us need family if we are to survive and thrive – humans and animals alike!

At CzechClass101, we know how important family is. Therefore, we take care to teach you all the important vocabulary and phrases pertaining to family.

Table of Contents

  1. Why Is It Important to Know Czech Vocabulary about Family?
  2. Learn a New Culture? Learn its Family Vocab first
  3. How CzechClass101 Can Help You Learn Czech Family Terms

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Family Phrases in Czech

1. Why Is It Important to Know Czech Vocabulary about Family?

Lioness with Cub

Well, if you’re serious about studying any new language, then learning about the most important social unit in Czech culture would be a crucial part of your education.

What is family, though? Strictly speaking, it’s a group of people who live together and are supposed to take care of one another. Some of them are genetically linked.

Family isn’t just about who we’re related to by blood, of course. It’s also one of the main influences in shaping every child’s life.

Family is Important for Children’s Healthy Development

Phrases Parents Say

Family is the single most important influence in a child’s life. Children depend on parents and family to protect them and provide for their needs from the day they were born.

Primary caregivers, which usually comprise parents and family, form a child’s first relationships. They are a child’s first teachers and are role models that show kids how to act and experience the world around them.

By nurturing and teaching children during their early years, families play an important role in making sure children are ready to learn when they enter school.

Families Can Take All Shapes and Sizes

However, the way families are put together is by no means standard.

Mom and Daughter

Single-parent and same-gender households have become a new norm the past few decades, and there’s no shame in this. When there is love, connection and proper care, a child can thrive anywhere.

Everyone also knows that sometimes friends can become like family and remain with us for life, because it’s all about human connection.

After all, we share many commonalities simply because we’re human, and we are programmed to connect with one another and belong to a group. This is very important for our well-being and survival.

It’s All About Feeling Connected

As John Northman, a psychologist from Buffalo, NY, told WebMD – feeling connected to others contributes to mental as well as physical health.

He pointed out that when people feel connected, they feel better physically, and they’re also less likely to feel depressed.

Couples Chatting

Or, if they do feel depressed, they’d be in a better position to get out of it when they feel they are connecting with others. This is because they would be psychologically supported too, Northman said.

There has even been some links drawn between addiction and feeling disconnected from others. According to an article in Psychology Today, research indicates that addiction is not solely a substance disorder, but also affected by people feeling insecurely attached to others.

It showed that securely attached individuals tend to feel comfortable in and enjoy life, while insecurely attached people typically struggle to fit in and connect.

2. Learn a New Culture? Learn its Family Vocab first

So, it’s clear that for most of us, family is our entry point into connection and belonging. This is true of every culture, so in every country, family takes prominence.

For this reason, CzechClass101 offers culturally-relevant lessons that will equip you well to understand families in Czech Republic.

Here are some of the most important Czech vocabulary and quotes about family and parenting!

A) Czech Family Vocabulary

Let’s start with the basic vocabulary. Without this collection of words, you’ll have a hard time describing any member of your family at all.

Family Terms
Family
rodina
Great grandfather
pradědeček
Mother
matka
Grandmother
babička
Father
otec
Grandfather
dědeček
Wife
manželka
Grandchild
vnouče
Husband
manžel
Granddaughter
vnučka
Parent
rodič
Grandson
vnuk
Child
dítě
Aunt
teta
Daughter
dcera
Uncle
strýc
Sister
sestra
Niece
neteř
Brother
bratr
Nephew
synovec
Younger sister
mladší sestra
Younger brother
mladší bratr
Older brother
starší bratr
Great grandmother
prababička
Cousin
sestřenice
Mother-in-law
tchýně
Father-in-law
tchán
Sister-in-law
švagrová
Brother-in-law
švagr
Partner
partner

Family of Three

B) Quotes About Family

Czech Family Quotes

One of the ways to improve your Czech language skills is by memorizing quotes from books, or poems.

Either source some from Czech literature, or make use of ours!

Nemusíte si vybírat svou rodinu. Je to Boží dar pro vás.

“You don’t choose your family. They are God’s gift to you, as you are to them.” – Desmond Tutu

Rodina není důležitá. Je vším.

“Family is not an important thing. It’s everything.” – Michael J. Fox

Rodina znamená, že nikdo nebyl nikdy zanechán nebo zapomenut.

“Family means no one gets left behind or forgotten.” – David Ogden Stiers

Moje rodina je moje síla a moje slabost.

“My family is my strength and my weakness.” – Aishwarya Rai

Rodina je jedním z mistrovských děl přírody.

“The family is one of nature’s masterpieces.” – George Santayana

Pokud přijdou potíže, je to vaše rodina, která vás podporuje.

“When trouble comes, it’s your family that supports you.” – Guy Lafleur

Rodina je první základní buňkou lidské společnosti.

“The family is the first essential cell of human society.” – Pope John XXIII

Neexistuje nic takového jako zábava pro celou rodinu.

“There is no such thing as fun for the whole family.” – Jerry Seinfeld

Musíte bránit svou čest. A svou rodinu.

“You have to defend your honor. And your family.” – Suzanne Vega

Všechny šťastné rodiny jsou stejné; každá nešťastná rodina je nešťastná svým vlastním způsobem.

“All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” – Leo Tolstoy

C) Test Your Knowledge!

Do you feel you have learned a lot in this blog? Let’s quickly test that!

In the table below, match the Czech vocabulary on the left with the definition of the relative in the right column.

MY RELATIVES
Relative Name Definition
1. rodina a. My male child
2. matka b. My older male sibling
3. otec c. My female sibling
4. manželka d. My child’s child
5. manžel e. My child’s female child
6. rodič f. My female parent
7. dítě g. My grandparent’s mother
8. dcera h. Mother to one of my parents
9. syn i. Relatives
10. sestra j. My female child
11. bratr k. My younger male sibling
12. mladší sestra l. Male spouse
13. mladší bratr m. The father of one of my parents
14. starší bratr n. My child’s male child
15. prababička o. My children’s father or mother
16. pradědeček p. The sister of one of my parents
17. babička q. The brother of one of my parents
18. dědeček r. My male parent
19. vnouče s. My sibling’s female child
20. vnučka t. My sibling’s male child
21. vnuk u. My male sibling
22. teta v. My parents’ sibling’s child
23. strýc w. Female spouse
24. neteř x. The grandfather of one of my parents
25. synovec y. The person I am a parent to
26. sestřenice z. My younger female sibling

How did it go? Don’t worry if you had trouble with it – you’ll get there! With a bit of practice, and our help at CzechClass101, you’ll soon have these family terms under the belt.

Family Shopping

3. How CzechClass101 Can Help You Learn Czech Family Terms

We hope that we helped you expand your family in Czech vocabulary!

CzechClass101, with its innovative online learning system, stands out among online learning platforms to help you master Czech easily.

Our lessons are tailored not only to increase your language skills, but to also inform you of Czech culture, including the Czech family structure.

When you sign up, you will get instant access to tools like:

1 – An extensive vocabulary list, regularly updated
2 – A new Czech word to learn every day
3 – Quick access to the Czech Key Phrase List
4 – A free Czech online dictionary
5 – The excellent 100 Core Czech Word List
6 – An almost limitless Lesson Library for learners of all levels

Further speed up your learning with the help of a personal tutor, who will first assess your current Czech language abilities to personalize your training and tailor it to your needs.

Hard work always pays off, and to help you in this, CzechClass101 will be there every step of the way toward your Czech mastery!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Family Phrases in Czech

Answers: 1.i. 2.f. 3.r. 4.w. 5.l. 6.o. 7.y. 8.j. 9.a. 10.c. 11.u. 12.z. 13.k. 14.b. 15.g 16.x. 17.h. 18.m. 19.d. 20.e. 21.n. 22.p. 23.q. 24.s. 25.t. 26.v.

CzechClass101’s Essential Czech Travel Phrase Guide

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Traveling to foreign countries is nearly always an exciting, enriching, and beneficial experience. Yet, some things can be real downers, such as boredom on a lengthy flight to Czech Republic. Really, binge-watching onboard movies can only be interesting for so long! And jet lag – another huge downer. Did you know that jet lag is more severe when you travel from the West to the East?

Well, we won’t know how to beat that, but there are fortunately plenty of remedies around to investigate.

To beat flight boredom, though, we may have the answer for you at CzechClass101! Why don’t you take the time to study Czech travel phrases? We make this super easy and fun, with great downloadables, like our PDF Cheat Sheets. Quickly memorize these, and impress your Czech friends or travel guide with your flawless Czech!

Table of Contents

  1. Importance Of Learning Travel Phrases
  2. 13 Must-Have Travel Phrases and Words
  3. Good-To-Have Travel Phrases
  4. Ways To Improve Communication in a Foreign Country
  5. CzechClass101 Can Help You Master Travel Phrases Easily and Effortlessly!

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1. Importance Of Learning Travel Phrases

Impressing Czech people or your travel partners will be the least of the benefits you reap from learning these helpful phrases. These are greater ones:

1) Eliminate Travel Frustration: First of all, you’ll be able to cut out a good chunk of travel frustration and inconvenience due to language barriers.

Know how to pronounce and use at least the basic Czech phrases, and then just look foreign. This should go a long way to help you get by and win you friends, because locals would be more inclined to help someone who took the trouble to learn a smidgen of their language.

Injured Woman In An Ambulance

2) Emergency Readiness: In case of an emergency, you will be able to get help a lot quicker if you know how to ask for what in Czech. Imagine miming to a doctor or nurse that you have a sore ear but that you’re allergic to penicillin. Not so easy, right?

Rather, you should know basic emergency travel phrases, especially if you suffer from a serious condition. Also, information about life-threatening allergies you have should always be on your person in the language of the country you’re visiting.

3) Sight-Seeing Readiness: Hopefully, you also travel to learn more about a country’s culture. Visiting the main tourist sites in Czech Republic will be more interesting if you know how to ask pertinent questions in Czech.

In this blog, we’ll also be giving you important travel phrases to consider – from the 13 essential must-have phrases to ones that are just generally useful and good to know.

Let’s get cracking!

2. 13 Must-Have Travel Phrases and Words

Preparing to Travel

Seasoned explorers of multiple countries will tell you that certain words and phrases are absolute must-knows in anyone’s travel vocabulary. Learning from them, we collated some of the most essential ones here for you.

If you know these travel phrases and words by heart in Czech, you will be much better equipped for your visit than most of your movie-binging travel mates.

1) Děkuji vám (Thank you)

As a tourist, you will be relying on the kindness of strangers to get by. Repay them with a small acknowledgment of their friendly generosity – know how to say “thank you” in Czech.

2) Mluvíte anglicky? (Do you speak English?)

While it may be a bit of a cop-out, sometimes you just can’t figure out how to communicate. Maybe you’re blanking on one specific word you need, maybe they’re speaking with a heavy accent, or maybe it’s just really late and you really want to get to the hotel. In that case, try asking if they speak English, and hopefully you can make things a little bit simpler for yourself.

Don’t abuse this phrase, though! If you just try to get by without learning any of the local language, not only will you not learn anything – you’ll be out of luck if they can’t speak English!

Man Greeting Someone

3) Jede z letiště do města autobus? (Is there a bus from the airport to the city?)

Public transit is usually cheaper, if slower, than taking a taxi or rideshare. Use this phrase to see if you can get where you’re going when you’re strapped for cash, or just when you’d like to take the scenic route into town!

4) Jede ten autobus na letiště? (Is this the right bus for the airport?)

Likewise, if you’re the kind of person who can get themselves moving early (or maybe you just have a late flight), maybe you want to take the bus to the airport rather than taking a cab. If that’s the case, you’ll want to be sure you’re actually heading the right way! You wouldn’t want to end up at a lookout point half an hour away, watching your flight take off in the distance, would you?

5) Promiňte, kolik stojí jízdenka? (Excuse me, what’s the fare?)

If you are paying for a cab, you’ll want to know how much. Most legal taxis will have meters, but when dealing with a currency you’re not familiar with, it can be worth asking just to double check that you’re paying the right amount – especially if the currency has cents.

6) Mám rezervaci (I have a reservation)

This one you can expect to use at least a few times throughout your trip, unless you’re the kind of person who travels by the seat of their pants and just goes to whatever hotel, motel, or hostel has rooms available.

7) Máte nějaké volné pokoje? (Do you have any vacancies tonight?)

If that’s the case, you’ll definitely be using this phrase instead. Quite possibly a lot, depending on how lucky you are!

Couple with a Map

8 ) Kde je nádraží? (Where is the train station?)

If you’re in a country with an expansive commuter rail system (or maybe just a fan of other types of locomotives), you may want to know where the closest station is. Just don’t go looking for pennies on the rails!

9) Jsem alergický na arašídy (I am allergic to peanuts)

Replace “peanuts” with whatever the word for your allergen may be. If your allergy is serious, you probably already know the importance of stating this very clearly in Czech.

If the condition is life-threatening, be sure to have a letter or prescription from a medical professional in Czech on your person at all times. Consider getting a medical alert bracelet specially made in Czech if your stay will be longer than a month or so.

Person Declining Meat

10) Máte nějaká vegetariánská jídla? (Do you have any vegetarian dishes?)

If you dislike eating certain things, or you have certain dietary restrictions, it would be best if you knew how to convey this clearly in Czech.

Remember, though, that saying “I’m vegan” or “I’m diabetic” may not be enough to get you what you want. The rules for veganism and vegetarianism are not standard everywhere in the world. Also, your patron might not understand what “diabetic” means. If you have a medical condition, it would be best to research some in-depth vocabulary beforehand.

11) Mohl bych dostat mapu? (Could I get a map?)

Planning on exploring your destination? Hopelessly lost? Maybe just an amateur cartographer? No matter the reason, this phrase is sure to come in handy. That said, you’re more likely to get use out of it at some sort of tourist or travel center than you are asking a random passerby on the street.

12) Kolik to stojí? (How much is this?)

Even if you’re not a big shopper, you’re probably going to need this phrase at some point. Knowing how to count in Czech will, of course, help a lot with purchases too.

13) Berete kreditní karty? (Do you take credit card?)

This is another travel phrase that will smooth your monetary transactions considerably.

Man Giving Credit Card to a Clerk

3. Good-To-Have Travel Phrases

Travel Verbs

Unlike the previous phrases, these are not really essential so much as they are useful. Yet, knowing these will still smooth over some bumps on your journey, more than just knowing the crucial phrases would.

1) Je Wi-Fi zdarma? (Is the Wi-Fi free?)

If you’re abroad, your normal cellular plans probably won’t have any service, and you’ll be totally reliant on publically available Wi-Fi while you’re out and about. Just ask a server, clerk, or attendant, and they’ll be happy to let you know. Just make sure you’re paying attention when they tell you the password!

2) Mohl byste mě vyfotit, prosím? (Could you take a picture of me please?)

What would a trip be with no photos to commemorate the event? Just be sure to ask this of someone who actually looks like they’d be willing to, unless you’re willing to risk being given the cold shoulder or worse. If you’re at a tourist attraction, you’ll find that most people are more than happy to take one for you, so long as you take one of them as well!

3) Můžete něco doporučit? (Do you have any recommendations?)

Eating alone in a restaurant? Or going out with new Czech friends or business colleagues? Let them help you decide what to have.

4) Mohl byste mi najít nekuřácký pokoj? (I’d like to have a non-smoking seat, please)

Though smoking has gone out of fashion in some places, it’s still popular in others. In the event you’re at a restaurant where smoking is allowed on premises, you can always ask this question to the staff and be seated elsewhere.

5) Vodu, prosím (Water, please)

If you’ve emptied your glass, or are cutting yourself off after a few drinks, you can always ask for some water. It can be especially useful if the restaurant is busy to the point you need to call out to someone to get service.

6) Mohl bych dostat účet? (Could I have the check?)

To finish off the restaurant related phrases, if you’re eating with friends or really want to impress your colleagues, taking the bill can be a nice treat for them. Of course, this phrase could come in handy as well if you’re eating alone and you’re just impatient to leave.

7) Co doporučujete jako suvenýr? (What do you recommend for a souvenir?)

Now that your trip is over, what better way to cap it all off than a memento, or maybe a gift for friends and family at home? It’ll be nicer to have something recommended by the locals than a cheap bauble from the airport store, so go ahead and ask someone you’ve met what they think.

4. Ways To Improve Communication in a Foreign Country

Survival Phrases

When traveling, it’s possible to keep communication smooth when you don’t share a language.

Do so by keeping these five tips in mind. They are aimed to help you communicate with those who cannot speak English very well, and also to keep your traveling experience pleasant!

1. Keep your English simple and easy to understand.
If the person you are talking to speaks very little English, use basic verbs, adjectives, and nouns, and keep sentences short.

However, don’t patronize them by talking in pidgin or like you would address a child. Keep your speech simple but natural, and use the correct grammar.

For instance, don’t say: “You come when?”. If you say: “When will you come?”, you will very likely be understood, and may even help someone who wants to improve their English.

2. Ask someone to write information down.
Apply Rule 1 first at your hotel, where the staff is very likely to be able to speak some English. Get them to write down, in their native language, things like: “I would like to go to the airport, please,” “Please take me to the beach,” or “Where is the closest bathroom?”

These written questions are something you can then give to taxi drivers or any other people who are willing and able to help you. This simple step could make your life a lot easier when you travel to a foreign country!

3. Avoid asking leading questions!
If you want the correct information from a non-native English speaker, that is.

When you need directions, for instance, don’t ask: “To get to the bus stop, do I need to turn left here?” If the person didn’t really understand you, you will probably just get a smile and a “Yes,” which could possibly make you miss your bus.

Rather, you should ask: “Where is the bus stop?” If they understand you, you will get the correct directions.

4. Pick the right person to ask for help.
Time to look at people and think a bit about their appearance! A younger person who looks like they might be a student is more likely to have English skills than the friendly but ancient lady smiling at you from a fruit stall.

If you don’t see anyone like that, head into town to the nearest bank, hospital, pharmacy, or hotel. The staff at those places usually speak a bit of English.

5. Know when to quit.
If you stuck to the above rules, but the person you are talking to only stares at you blankly, say thank you and leave. Hanging around hoping someone will suddenly understand and respond is just wasting your time, and may irritate them as well. Go find someone else.

5. CzechClass101 Can Help You Master Travel Phrases Easily and Effortlessly!

So, reader, have you found this article helpful?

Do you feel comfortable enough to use some essential travel phrases in Czech? We’d also love to hear if you think we left out important travel phrases. Leave your suggestions and opinions in the comments!

CzechClass101 takes the lead with many free learning tools to help you master Czech reading and speaking easily, and in fun ways.

These tools include:

– An extensive vocabulary list, regularly updated
– A new Czech word to learn every day
– Quick access to the Czech Key Phrase List
– A free Czech online dictionary
– The excellent 100 Core Czech Word List
– An almost limitless Lesson Library for learners of all levels

You will also have access to topic-specific recordings like our Before You Travel: Survival Phrases lesson.

Learn even more efficiently with the help of a personal tutor, after taking an assessment test to personalize and tailor your training.

Getting a tutor is also a good option if you meet challenges in your learning, or need to fast-track correct pronunciation and diction. Your very own friendly, Czech-speaking teacher will be only a text away on a special app, anywhere, anytime – an excellent option for business persons!

Using a guided learning system that was developed by experts in language and online education, you’ll receive personal feedback and constant support to improve in no time. You’ll also be tasked with weekly assignments in reading, writing, and speaking to hone your Czech speaking skills.

Imagine how impressed your Czech friends or colleagues will be when you display your excellent conversational skills! With CzechClass101, getting there will be easy and fun.

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How To Post In Perfect Czech on Social Media

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You’re learning to speak Czech, and it’s going well. Your confidence is growing! So much so that you feel ready to share your experiences on social media—in Czech.

At Learn Czech, we make this easy for you to get it right the first time. Post like a boss with these phrases and guidelines, and get to practice your Czech in the process.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Czech

1. Talking about Your Restaurant Visit in Czech

Eating out is fun, and often an experience you’d like to share. Take a pic, and start a conversation on social media in Czech. Your friend will be amazed by your language skills…and perhaps your taste in restaurants!

Libor plans to eat at a restaurant with his friends, posts an image of the food, and leaves this comment:

POST

Let’s break down Libor’s post.

Pojďme se někam najíst. Není nad to dobře se navečeřet!
“Let’s go out to eat somewhere. There is nothing better than a good dinner!”

1- Pojďme se někam najíst.

First is an expression meaning “Let’s go out to eat somewhere.”
The first expression is a very common way to make an offer to somebody for something. In this particular situation, the speaker suggests that the group goes out and eat together, which is definitely a frequent and desirable expression in everyday life.

2- Není nad to dobře se navečeřet!

Then comes the phrase – “There is nothing better than a good dinner!.”
The first two words literally mean “there is nothing above.” This phrase is often used in daily conversation to emphasize how great something is.

COMMENTS

In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

1- Už se mi sbíhají sliny.

His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning – “That’s mouth watering.”
Use this expression as a positive opinion about the food in the picture.

2- Ale to vypadá báječně!

His supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning – “It looks delicious!”
This is another, more traditional way to give an opinion about the food.

3- Dáme si do nosu!

His girlfriend’s high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning – “Let’s have a blast!”
Use this expression to strongly agree with the poster’s suggestion.

4- Pěknou zábavu.

His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning – “Have a good time.”
This is a well-wish, most likely from someone who will not be joining the party.

VOCABULARY

Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • navečeřet se: “to have dinner”
  • sbíhají sliny: “mouth-watering”
  • báječně: “delicious”
  • dát si: “to have”
  • zábava: “fun”
  • najíst: “to eat”
  • někam: “somewhere”
  • vypadat: “to look like”
  • So, let’s practice a bit. If a friend posted something about having dinner with friends, which phrase would you use?

    Now go visit a Czech restaurant, and wow the staff with your language skills!

    2. Post about Your Mall Visit in Czech

    Another super topic for social media is shopping—everybody does it, most everybody loves it, and your friends on social media are probably curious about your shopping sprees! Share these Czech phrases in posts when you visit a mall.

    Jana shop with her sister at the mall, posts an image of the two of them, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    Potřebuji relax. Jde se nakupovat.
    “I need to relax. Let’s go shopping.”

    1- Potřebuji relax.

    First is an expression meaning “I need to relax.”
    This expression is often used when somebody wants to express that they are really tired and need a break.

    2- Jde se nakupovat.

    Then comes the phrase – “Let’s go shopping.”
    The first two words literally mean “It goes itself” in third person singular, but the meaning of this expression corresponds with the English phrase “Let’s go.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Nemáme peněz nazbyt.

    Her boyfriend, Libor, uses an expression meaning – “We don’t have money to spend”.
    Use this expression if you feel anxious about the budget for shopping, or if you want to joke a bit with the poster.

    2- Můžu jít s tebou?

    Her college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning – “Can I go with you?”
    With this question, you’re either serious about joining in the shopping, or it’s a way of saying that you wish you could go with.

    3- Rozjeď to Jani.

    Her high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning – “Bring it on, Jana.”
    Use this expression to be humorous and encouraging.

    4- Kup si něco pěkného.

    Her husband’s high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning – “Buy something nice.”
    Use this comment just to be part of the conversation in a casual, friendly manner.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • nakupovat: “to buy”
  • nemít: “not to have”
  • moci: “can”
  • rozjet to: “to bring it on”
  • pěkný: “nice”
  • potřebovat: “to need”
  • něco: “something”
  • to: “it”
  • So, if a friend posted something about going shopping, which phrase would you use?

    3. Talking about a Sport Day in Czech

    Sports events, whether you’re the spectator or the sports person, offer fantastic opportunity for great social media posts. Learn some handy phrases and vocabulary to start a sport-on-the-beach conversation in Czech.

    Libor plays with his friends at the beach, posts an image of the team playing, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    Nejlepší pro zdraví je pravidelně sportovat.
    “The best thing for your health is to play sports regularly. ”

    1- Nejlepší pro zdraví

    First is an expression meaning “The best thing for your health .”
    The first word is the adjective “best.” Next is the preposition, and the noun for “health.” This expression is often used when speaking about something healthy.

    2- je pravidelně sportovat.

    Then comes the phrase – “is to play sports regularly”.
    The English phrase “to play sports” is expressed in Czech by a verb.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Ty máš ale vypracované tělo…

    His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning – “What a muscular body you have…”
    Use this expression if you wish to give a compliment.

    2- Sportem ku zdraví.

    His supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning – “Play sports to stay healthy.”
    Use this comment if you agree with the post, and simply wish to reiterate.

    3- Ve zdravém těle, zdravý duch.

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning – “Healthy body, healthy mind.”
    Another thought that elaborates along the same lines as the poster’s original post.

    4- Opatrně, ať tě neklepne pepka.

    His girlfriend’s nephew, Radim, uses an expression meaning – “Be careful not to get an infarct.”
    Use this expression if you wish to tease the poster with a rather dark warning to not overdo physical activity. An infarct is a heart attack.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • pravidelně: “regularly”
  • tělo: “body”
  • zdraví: “health”
  • duch: “spirit”
  • opatrně: “carefully”
  • zdravý : “healthy”
  • sport: “sport”
  • ty: “you”
  • Which phrase would you use if a friend posted something about sports?

    But sport is not the only thing you can play! Play some music, and share it on social media.

    4. Share a Song on Social Media in Czech

    Music is the language of the soul, they say. So, don’t hold back—share what touches your soul with your friends!

    Jana shares a song she just heard at a party, posts an image of the artist, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    Tuhle písničku miluji!
    “I love this song.”

    1- miluji!

    First is an expression meaning “I love”.
    This word is used to express our passion for somebody or something. Despite the fact that Czech people are more reserved in expressing their feelings than Americans, for example, it is a useful and frequent expression.

    2- Tuhle písničku

    Then comes the phrase – “this song.”
    The last word means “song” in the accusative case. The first word means “this.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- To je krása.

    Her neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning – “That’s beautiful.”
    Use this expression when you agree with the poster.

    2- Připomíná mi to naše první rande.

    Her boyfriend, Libor, uses an expression meaning – “It reminds me of our first date.”
    Use this expression if you wish to comment on the evocative nature of the song, and when its meaning is special for you and your girlfriend/special person.

    3- Zazpívej nám ji!

    Her high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning – “Sing it to us!”
    Use this expression to be humorous.

    4- No to je romantika.

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning – “Well, that’s romantic.”
    Use this expression to comment with a personal opinion regarding the song.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • milovat: “love”
  • krása: “beauty”
  • připomínat: “remind “
  • zazpívat: “to sing”
  • romantika: “romance”
  • školní: “school”
  • písnička: “song”
  • první: “first”
  • Which song would you share? And what would you say to a friend who posted something about sharing music or videos?

    Now you know how to start a conversation about a song or a video on social media!

    5. Czech Social Media Comments about a Concert

    Still on the theme of music—visiting live concerts and shows just have to be shared with your friends. Here are some handy phrases and vocab to wow your followers in Czech!

    Libor goes to a concert, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    Pojď, půjdem si zapařit.
    “Let’s party!”

    1- Pojď

    First is an expression meaning “Let’s go.”
    A very useful and common expression. It literally means “go!” and is the imperative of the verb “to go”.

    2- půjdem si zapařit.

    Then comes the phrase – ” we go party!.”
    The last word in this expression is a slang term for partying, which includes activities like drinking alcohol or dancing wildly at a concert or disco.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Přijďte brzo domů.

    His girlfriend, Jana, uses an expression meaning – “Come home early. ”
    Use this expression if you wish to tell the poster to do something.

    2- To je můj oblíbený zpěvák.

    His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning – “He’s my favorite singer.”
    Use this expression to share a personal opinion regarding the artist.

    3- Zpívá docela dobře.

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning – “He’s singing quite well.”
    This is another way of giving a personal opinion regarding the artist.

    4- Ti jedou, co.

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning – “They rock, don’t they?”
    Use this expression when you agree with the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • jít: “to go “
  • brzo: “early”
  • zpěvák: “singer”
  • dobře: “well”
  • jet: “to go “
  • pařit: “to party”
  • docela: “quite”
  • oblíbený: “favorite”
  • If a friend posted something about a concert, which phrase would you use?

    6. Talking about an Unfortunate Accident in Czech

    Oh dear. You broke something by accident. Use these Czech phrases to start a thread on social media. Or maybe just to let your friends know why you are not contacting them!

    Jana accidentally breaks her mobile phone, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    A je po telefonu…
    “And the phone is broken…”

    1- A je

    First is an expression meaning “And”.
    The first word is a conjunction that corresponds with the English “and.” Conjunctions connect sentences or words. In this phrase, where “and” is the first word in the sentence, it implies that something happened before the phone was dropped and broke.

    2- po telefonu…

    Then comes the phrase – “the phone is broken….”
    The first word is a preposition that can be translated into English in many ways. But in this phrase, it literally means “over.” So altogether the phrase means “The phone is over.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Můžeš si ho dát spravit.

    Her neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning – “It can be repaired.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling warmhearted.

    2- Určitě bude ještě fungovat.

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning – “It’ll work, I’m sure.”
    Use this expression if you want to be encouraging.

    3- Stejně to byl starej krám.

    Her college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning – “Nevermind. It was an old thing.”
    This is a personal opinion you can share about the phone, trivializing the event.

    4- Neříkal jsem ti, abys dávala pozor.

    Her nephew, Radim, uses an expression meaning – “Didn’t I tell you to be careful?”
    Use this expression to partake in the conversation in a lighthearted manner. However, it could come across as pedantic, so be sure that the poster will understand your intent.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • telefon: “phone”
  • spravit: “to repair”
  • určitě: “certainly”
  • starej krám: “old thing”
  • říkat: “to say”
  • fungovat: “to work”
  • pozor: “to be careful”
  • neříkat: “not to say”
  • If a friend posted something about having broken something by accident, which phrase would you use?

    So, now you know how to discuss an accident in Czech. Well done!

    7. Chat about Your Boredom on Social Media in Czech

    Sometimes, we’re just bored with how life goes. And to alleviate the boredom, we write about it on social media. Add some excitement to your posts by addressing your friends and followers in Czech!

    Libor gets bored at home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    To je strašná nuda.
    “I’m terribly bored.”

    1- To je strašná

    First is an expression meaning “It is a terrible”.
    The adjective that corresponds with the English word “terrible” is used to express a huge quantity of our emotions. It can be used to describe something positive or negative. Most Czech adjectives have different masculine, feminine, or neuter forms. This adjective is in the feminine form.

    2- nuda.

    Then comes the phrase – “bore..”
    When Czech people want to describe something boring, they usually use this noun.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Tak ráda bych šla do kina.

    His girlfriend, Jana, uses an expression meaning – “I would like to go to the cinema. ”
    Use this expression to make a suggestion to the poster.

    2- Půjčím ti pěknou knížku.

    His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning – “I’ll lend you a nice book.”
    Use this expression if you wish to be helpful.

    3- Pojď mi pomoct okopávat brambory.

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning – “Come on, help me (to) harvest potatoes.”
    Use this expression if you are feeling frivolous and lighthearted.

    4- Zkus, jestli dokážeš levitovat.

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning – “Try to see if you can levitate.”
    Use this expression if you’re feeling humorous.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • strašná: “terrible”
  • kino: “cinema”
  • půjčit: “lend”
  • bambora: “potato”
  • jestli: “if”
  • zkusit: “to try”
  • levitovat: “levitate”
  • knížka: “book”
  • If a friend posted something about being bored, which phrase would you use?

    Still bored? Share another feeling and see if you can start a conversation!

    8. Exhausted? Share It on Social Media in Czech

    Sitting in public transport after work, feeling like chatting online? Well, converse in Czech about how you feel, and let your friends join in!

    Jana feels exhausted after a long day at work, posts an image of herself looking tired, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    Už nemůžu. Jsem úplně hotová.
    “I’m dying. I’m completely exhausted.”

    1- Už nemůžu

    First is an expression meaning “I am dying..”
    This phrase literally means “I can’t anymore.” Czech people use it to express that they can’t do something specific anymore.

    2- Jsem úplně hotová.

    Then comes the phrase – “I am completely exhausted.”
    This expression, which literally means “to be done,” is a popular phrase for expressing exhaustion. The last word is an adjective in the feminine form.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Za chvíli bude večeře.

    Her boyfriend, Libor, uses an expression meaning – “Dinner will be ready in a moment.”
    Use this expression if you want to be helpful and encouraging.

    2- Chvíli si odpočiň.

    Her neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning – “Rest for a while.”
    Make this suggestion to show you are warmhearted and caring.

    3- Myslím, že neumíš relaxovat.

    Her high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning – “You can’t relax, I think.”
    Use this expression to comment and make conversation by posting a personal opinion.

    4- Nechceš kávu?

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning – “Do you want some coffee?”
    Ask this question if you wish to make the poster an offer that could be helpful.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • úplně: “completely”
  • večeře: “dinner”
  • odpočinout si: “to rest”
  • myslet: “to think”
  • káva: “coffee”
  • nechtít: “not to want”
  • neumět: “cannot”
  • chvíle: “moment”
  • If a friend posted something about being exhausted, which phrase would you use?

    Now you know how to say you’re exhausted in Czech! Well done.

    9. Talking about an Injury in Czech

    So life happens, and you manage to hurt yourself during a soccer game. Very Tweet-worthy! Here’s how to do it in Czech.

    Libor suffers a painful injury, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    Zlomil jsem si ruku.
    “I broke my arm.”

    1- Zlomil jsem si

    First is an expression meaning “I broke my.”
    Czech verbs are sometimes accompanied by reflexive pronouns, which have a similar meaning to “self.” The phrase literally means “I broke myself…”

    2- ruku.

    Then comes the phrase – “arm..”
    This term originally meant “hand,” but is now used for both “arm” and “hand”. In Czech, a word that means “arm” exists, but it is used rarely and only in official documents. In spoken Czech, it is not used at all.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Chudáčku, co se ti stalo?

    His girlfriend, Jana, uses an expression meaning – “Oh poor you, what happened?”
    Use this expression if you are feeling sympathetic.

    2- Ještě žes ji nezlomil mně.

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning – “At least you didn’t break mine.”
    Use this expression to be lighthearted and humorous.

    3- Máš štěstí, že to není noha.

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning – “You’re lucky that it’s not a leg.”
    Comment this phrase if you wish to remind the poster that things could’ve been worse.

    4- Za tři týdny ti sundají sádru, vydrž.

    His high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning – “Hang in there. They’ll take your cast off in three weeks.”
    Use this expression if you wish to be supportive and optimistic in order to cheer up the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • zlomit: “to break”
  • co: “what”
  • mně: “me (dativ)”
  • noha: “leg”
  • týden: “week”
  • chudáček: “poor”
  • sádra: “cast”
  • ruka: “hand, arm”
  • If a friend posted something about being injured, which phrase would you use?

    We love to share our fortunes and misfortunes; somehow that makes us feel connected to others.

    10. Starting a Conversation Feeling Disappointed in Czech

    Sometimes things don’t go the way we planned. Share your disappointment about this with your friends!

    Jana feels disappointed about today’s weather, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    Nesnáším, když nám na dovolené prší.
    “I hate when it’s raining during my vacation.”

    1- Nesnáším, když

    First is an expression meaning “I hate when.”
    The first word, which means “to hate,” is widely used to express a negative attitude toward something or someone. This negative form Czech verb is considered a strong term. While the positive form of this verb means to “tolerate” or “undergo” something.

    2- nám na dovolené prší.

    Then comes the phrase – “it is raining during my vacation..”
    To express rainy weather, Czech people mostly use the verb that means “to rain.” Rarely is it used as a noun. The Czech language also has an adjective that means “rainy,” but this term is outdated and not used in spoken language.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Podle předpovědi mělo být slunečno.

    Her boyfriend, Libor, uses an expression meaning – “According to the forecast, it’s supposed to be sunny.”
    Use this phrase if you wish to make conversation by sharing something you know.

    2- Nám loni na dovolené taky pršelo.

    Her neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning – “It was also raining during my vacation last year.”
    This is another phrase to use to make conversation with personal news.

    3- Můžeš si zkusit zpívat v dešti.

    Her high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning – “You can try singing in the rain.”
    Use this expression to be humorous, referring to the old classic by Gene Kelly: “Singin’ in the rain”. It was a movie, with a song titled the same, released in the 1950s.

    4- Déšť je dobrý pro úrodu.

    Her supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning – “The rain is necessary for a good harvest.”
    Use this expression to remind the poster of the positives regarding the weather.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • nesnášet: “to hate”
  • předpověď: “forecast”
  • dovolená: “vacation”
  • zkusit: “to try”
  • déšť: “rain”
  • úroda: “harvest”
  • dobrý: “good”
  • ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,

  • pršet: “to rain”
  • How would you comment in Czech when a friend is disappointed?

    Not all posts need to be about a negative feeling, though!

    11. Talking about Your Relationship Status in Czech

    Don’t just change your relationship status in Settings, talk about it!

    Libor changes his status to “In a relationship”, posts an image of him and Jana, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    Toto je má drahá polovička.
    “This is my better half.”

    1- Toto je

    First is an expression meaning “This is.”
    The word corresponding with “this” has a different shape in Czech depending on its gender: masculine, feminine, or neuter. In this expression, the speaker introduces his girlfriend. However, it is custom in Czech phraseology to use the neuter form of “this.”

    2- má drahá polovička.

    Then comes the phrase – “my better half.”
    This expression refers to somebody we love.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Gratuluji!

    His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning – “Congratulations!”
    This is the traditional congratulation fitting for this occasion.

    2- Ať vám to klape.

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning – “Good luck.”
    Use this expression if you wish to be humorous with sarcasm.

    3- No konečně!

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning – “Finally!”
    Use this expression to indicate that you’ve been expecting the news, and feel positive about it.

    4- Bezva!

    His high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning – “Great!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling good about the romantic match.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • toto: “this”
  • gratulovat: “to congratulate”
  • ať to klape: “good luck”
  • konečně: “finally”
  • bezva: “great”
  • drahá: “dear”
  • no: “well”
  • být: “to be”
  • What would you say in Czech when a friend changes their relationship status?

    Being in a good relationship with someone special is good news – don’t be shy to spread it!

    12. Post about Getting Married in Czech

    Wow, so things got serious, and you’re getting married. Congratulations! Or, your friend is getting married, so talk about this in Czech.

    Jana is getting married today, so she leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    Spolu navždy!
    “Together forever.”

    1- Spolu

    First is an expression meaning “Together.”
    This is a frequently used word in Czech that expresses the intention of doing something with another person.

    2- navždy!

    Then comes the phrase – “forever!.”
    A bit dramatic, this word is always suitable for important statements, especially about relationships.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Miluji tě!

    Her husband, Libor, uses an expression meaning – “I love you.”
    Use this expression to express your feelings to your beloved.

    2- Tichá voda břehy mele.

    Her high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning – “Still waters run deep.”
    Use this expression if you feel that the poster is secretive or unpredictable, but in a positive way.

    3- Jsem úplně dojatá.

    Her husband’s high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning – “I’m really moved.”
    Use this expression if you are really touched and happy about the news.

    4- Přeji vám všechno nejlepší.

    Her supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning – “I wish you all the best.”
    This is a traditional wish when someone announces news of this kind.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • spolu: “together”
  • milovat: “to love”
  • tichá: “quiet”
  • dojatá: “moved”
  • nejlepší: “best”
  • přát: “to wish”
  • voda: “water”
  • navždy: “forever”
  • How would you respond in Czech to a friend’s post about getting married?

    For the next topic, fast forward about two to three years into the future after the wedding…

    13. Announcing Big News in Czech

    Wow, huge stuff has been happening in your life! Announce it in Czech.

    Libor finds out he and his wife are going to have their second baby, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    Manželka je zase těhotná.
    “My wife is pregnant again.”

    1- Manželka je

    First is an expression meaning “My wife is.”
    The first word means “wife” in Czech. The personal pronoun “my” is usually omitted.

    2- zase těhotná.

    Then comes the phrase – “pregnant again..”
    The latter word, an adjective in the feminine form, is the Czech equivalent of the English word “pregnant.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Taková radostná událost. Blahopřeji.

    His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning – “Such a happy event. Congratulations!”
    Use this expression if you are happy for the couple, and to congratulate them.

    2- Bude to kluk nebo holka?

    His wife’s high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning – “Will it be a boy or a girl?”
    Ask this question to keep the conversation going and if you want to know the baby’s gender.

    3- Co to bude tentokrát?

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning – “What will it be this time?”
    This is another way of asking the same as the previous poster about the gender of the baby.

    4- Až se narodí, tak to oslavíme, tatíku.

    His nephew, Radim, uses an expression meaning – “After it’s born, let’s celebrate, daddy.”
    Use this expression if you are happy for the couple and wish to celebrate with the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • těhotná: “pregnant”
  • událost: “affair”
  • kluk: “boy”
  • tentokát: “this time”
  • narodit se: “to be born”
  • holka: “girl”
  • tatík: “daddy”
  • oslavit: “to celebrate”
  • Which phrase would you choose when a friend announces their pregnancy on social media?

    So, talking about a pregnancy will get you a lot of traction on social media. But wait till you see the responses to babies!

    14. Posting Czech Comments about Your Baby

    Your bundle of joy is here, and you cannot keep quiet about it! Share your thoughts in Czech.

    Jana plays with her baby, posts an image of the little one, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    To je náš chlapeček.
    “This is our boy.”

    1- To je

    First is an expression meaning “This is.”
    The first word is a point pronoun; the second word is the verb “to be,” in third person singular.

    2- náš chlapeček.

    Then comes the phrase – “our boy..”
    The first word is the possessive pronoun for “our” in the masculine form. The latter word means “boy” in the diminutive form.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Celý tatínek.

    Her husband, Libor, uses an expression meaning – “Looks like the father.”
    Use this comment to share your opinion, in this case that you think the baby resembles his dad.

    2- Gratuluji mamince a tatínkovi.

    Her supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning – “Congratulations to momma and papa.”
    This is a traditional but casual way to congratulating the parents.

    3- Silák po tatínkovi.

    Her college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning – “He is strong like his father. ”
    Another personal opinion about the baby’s appearance.

    4- Ten je krásný!

    Her husband’s high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning – “Such a handsome boy!”
    And another opinion, complimenting the child’s physical appearance.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • náš: “our”
  • tatínek: “daddy”
  • gratulovat: “to congratulate”
  • silák: “strong boy”
  • krásný: “handsome”
  • a: “and”
  • být: “to be”
  • maminka: “mom”
  • If your friend is the mother or father, which phrase would you use on social media?

    Congratulations, you know the basics of chatting about a baby in Czech! But we’re not done with families yet…

    15. Czech Comments about a Family Reunion

    Family reunions – some you love, some you hate. Share about it on your feed.

    Libor goes to a family gathering, posts an image of the food, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    Koláče naší babičky. Nejlepší na světě.
    “Our grandma’s cakes. Best in the world.”

    1- Koláče naší babičky.

    First is an expression meaning “Our grandma’s cakes..”
    This sentence starts with the noun “cake” in plural form; the next two words are the personal pronoun “our” and the noun “grandma” in the genitive case.

    2- Nejlepší na světě.

    Then comes the phrase – “Best in the world..”
    The first word means the same as “the best.” The latter words are the preposition and the noun.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Vypadají báječně.

    His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning – “They look delicious.”
    Use this expression to share your thoughts on the food’s appearance.

    2- Nedržíš náhodou dietu?

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning – “Aren’t you on a diet?”
    Use this expression to tease the poster.

    3- Dostávám na ně chuť.

    His nephew, Radim, uses an expression meaning – “I’m building an appetite for them.”
    Use this expression to make conversation and share your feelings about the cakes.

    4- Ať neztloustneš!

    His wife’s high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning – “Don’t get fat!”
    Use this expression to be humorous.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • koláč: “cake”
  • vypadat: “to look like”
  • dieta: “diet”
  • chuť: “appetite”
  • minulý: “last”
  • ztloustnout: “to get fat”
  • svět: “world”
  • babička: “grandma”
  • Which phrase is your favorite to comment on a friend’s photo about a family reunion?

    16. Post about Your Travel Plans in Czech

    So, the family are going on holiday. Do you know to post and leave comments in Czech about being at the airport, waiting for a flight?

    Jana waits at the airport for her flight, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    Konečně začíná dovolená!
    “The holiday finally starts!”

    1- Konečně začíná

    First is an expression meaning “finally starts!.”
    The latter word means the same as the English verb “to start” in third person singular form.

    2- dovolená!

    Then comes the phrase – “The holiday.”
    This Czech term for “holiday” is derived from the verb meaning “to allow” or “to permit.” People are allowed or permitted to take a day off.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Pěkně si ji užijte.

    Her neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning – “Enjoy it.”
    Use this expression to wish the poster well for the holiday.

    2- Až přijedeš, musíš mi ukázat fotky.

    Her husband’s high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning – “You have to show me photos when you come back.”
    Use this expression if you would like to know the details of the holiday afterwards.

    3- Ať vám vyjde počasí!

    Her supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning – “Hopefully, the weather will turn out fine for you!”
    This comment is a way to make conversation with the weather as a topic.

    4- Pak mi zavolej, půjdem na kafe.

    Her college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning – “Call me after you get here. We’ll have some coffee together.”
    Use this expression to make conversation, and invite the poster for coffee when they return.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • konečně: “finally”
  • užít: “to enjoy”
  • fotka: “photo”
  • počasí: “weather”
  • zavolat: “to call”
  • dovolená: “holiday”
  • kafe: “coffee”
  • jít: “to go”
  • Choose and memorize your best airport phrase in Czech!

    Hopefully the rest of the trip is better!

    17. Posting about an Interesting Find in Czech

    So maybe you’re strolling around at your local market, and find something interesting. Here are some handy Czech phrases!

    Libor finds an unusual item at a local market, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    To je ale rozkošná věcička.
    “What a lovely thing.”

    1- To je ale

    First is an expression meaning “What .”
    Literally, this phrase means “it is but.” It’s the Czech equivalent to the conjunction “but” and has a similar meaning to the English word “what.” It expresses that the speaker is admiring something.

    2- rozkošná věcička.

    Then comes the phrase – “a lovely thing!.”
    After the first word, an adjective meaning “lovely,” is the word meaning “thing” in its diminutive form. This construction occurs often in the Czech language.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- To se mi líbí.

    His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning – “I like it.”
    Use this expression to share your positive opinion of the find.

    2- Takové už máme doma tři.

    His wife, Jana, uses an expression meaning – “We already have three like that at home.”
    Use this expression to make conversation with personal details.

    3- Tohle je taky dobré.

    His high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning – “This is also good.”
    Use this phrase when you have a photo to share and want to make conversation.

    4- To chci taky.

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning – “I want it too.”
    Use this expression to indicate that you like the find.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • rozkošná: “lovely”
  • líbit se: “to like”
  • doma: “at home”
  • dobré: “good”
  • taky: “also”
  • tři: “three”
  • chtít: “to want”
  • mít: “to have”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s interesting find?

    Perhaps you will even learn the identity of your find! Or perhaps you’re on holiday, and visiting interesting places…

    18. Post about a Sightseeing Trip in Czech

    Let your friends know what you’re up to in Czech, especially when visiting a remarkable place! Don’t forget the photo.

    Jana visits a famous landmark, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    Konečně jsme tu a stojí to za to.
    “We are finally here and it’s worth it.”

    1- Konečně jsme tu

    First is an expression meaning “We are finally here.”
    The structure of this expression is basically the same in English.

    2- a stojí to za to.

    Then comes the phrase – “and it is worth it..”
    This expression is often used in spoken Czech. It literally means that something costs some price, but the price is more than reasonable.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- To jsou ale panoramata!

    Her supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning – “Such a wonderful panorama!”
    Use this expression to show you are impressed with the view.

    2- To je moc pěkné!

    Her husband’s high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning – “It is very nice!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic about the location.

    3- Tam bych taky chtěla.

    Her neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning – “I’d like to also go there.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling some envy and wish to visit the place too.

    4- Proč jste mě nevzali s sebou.

    Her high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning – “Why didn’t you take me with you?”
    Use this expression to pretend you’re feeling excluded. It’s a form of humour to keep a conversation going.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • stát za něco: “worth it”
  • panoramata: “panorama”
  • pěkné: “nice”
  • chtít: “to want”
  • proč: “why”
  • nevzít: “not to take”
  • mě: “me “
  • moc: “very”
  • Which phrase would you prefer when a friend posts about a famous landmark?

    Share your special places with the world. Or simply post about your relaxing experiences.

    19. Post about Relaxing Somewhere in Czech

    So you’re doing nothing yet you enjoy that too? Tell your social media friends about it in Czech!

    Libor relaxes at a beautiful place, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    To je pohoda.
    “It’s relaxing.”

    1- To je

    First is an expression meaning “It is.”
    This phrase consists of two words. The first one is the personal pronoun “it” and the latter one is the verb “to be” in its third person singular form.

    2- pohoda.

    Then comes the phrase – “relaxing..”
    One of the most common Czech terms, this word can mean “relax,” “peace,” something “comfortable,” etc.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Vy si teda užíváte.

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning – “You seem to be enjoying it. ”
    Use this expression to agree with the poster.

    2- Pěkně si odpočiněte.

    His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning – “Get comfortable.
    This is a suggestion that’s simply a way to keep the conversation going.

    3- Vy se máte. Tady prší a má musím do práce.

    His wife’s high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning – “I envy you. It’s raining here and I have to go to work.”
    Use this expression to indicate that you’re envious and to share some personal news.

    4- To vypadá krásně.

    His supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning – “It looks beautiful.”
    Use this comment if you think the scenery is beautiful.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • být: “to be”
  • vy : “you”
  • odpočinout si: “to get relaxed”
  • pršet: “to rain”
  • krásně: “beautifully”
  • práce: “work”
  • do: “to”
  • muset: “must”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s feed?

    The break was great, but now it’s time to return home.

    20. What to Say in Czech When You’re Home Again

    And you’re back! What will you share with friends and followers?

    Jana returns home after a vacation, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    Konečně doma.
    “Finally home.”

    1- Konečně

    First is an expression meaning “Finally.”
    This word often stands at the beginning of a Czech sentence, especially when the speaker uses expressive language.

    2- doma.

    Then comes the phrase – “home..”
    This Czech word is derived from the word “house,” and there is in fact only a slight difference between them.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Jak jste se měli?

    Her neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning – “How was it?”
    Ask this question if you wish to get more information.

    2- Zpátky do reality.

    Her high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning – “Back to reality.”
    Use this expression to keep the conversation going with a personal observation.

    3- Vítejte zpátky.

    Her supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning – “Welcome back.”
    This is a traditional way to welcome someone back after travels.

    4- Už víte, kam pojedete příště?

    Her husband’s high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning – “Do you know where to go next?”
    Ask this question to be part of the conversation and to know more details.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • doma: “at home”
  • jak: “how”
  • zpátky: “back”
  • vítat: “to welcome”
  • příště: “next”
  • kam: “where”
  • vědět: “to know”
  • realita: “reality”
  • How would you welcome a friend back from a trip?

    What do you post on social media during a religious holiday, such as Easter?

    21. It’s Time to Celebrate in Czech

    It’s a religious holiday and you wish to post something about it on social media. What would you say?

    Libor and his family plan to observe a traditional Easter, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    Jde se na mrskut.
    “We are going to Easter whip.”

    1- Jde se

    First is an expression meaning “We are going.”
    In this Czech phrase, the word “to go” is used in its third person singular form, literally meaning “it goes.” But when using this phrase, we say that we are going somewhere, or we encourage somebody to go with us.

    2- na mrskut.

    Then comes the phrase – “to Easter’s whip..”
    Easter’s whip refers to a unique and rather odd Czech Easter tradition: boys equipped with whips made from young willow branches visit girls’ houses and gently beat them on their back sides to preserve their beauty and health. Men are given nicely colored eggs for doing this.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Pěkně všechny vymrskejte.

    His supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning – “Whip all of them properly.”
    This is a traditional response.

    2- To aby si dala do kalhot polštář.

    His wife’s high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning – “Better put a pillow in my trousers.”
    Use this expression to be humorous.

    3- Stavte se taky u nás.

    His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning – “Come by.”
    Use this expression to be inviting.

    4- Schválně, kdo dostane víc vajec.

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning – “Let’s see who will get more Easter eggs.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling frivolous and want to partake in the conversation.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • mrskut: “whip”
  • vymrskat: “to whip”
  • kalhoty: “trousers”
  • stavit se: “come by”
  • dostat: “to get “
  • víc: “more”
  • vajíčko: “egg”
  • polštář: “pillow”
  • If a friend posted something about a holiday, which phrase would you use?

    Easter and other religious holidays are not the only special ones to remember!

    22. Posting about a Birthday on Social Media in Czech

    Your friend or you are celebrating your birthday in an unexpected way. Be sure to share this on social media!

    Jana goes to her birthday party, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    Děkuji moc všem za tak krásné překvapení.
    “Thank you all for such a wonderful surprise.”

    1- Děkuji moc všem

    First is an expression meaning “Thank you all.”
    The first word is the verb that corresponds with the English word “to thank.” In this sentence it is used in its first person singular form. The ending of this Czech verb is different according to its conjugation.

    2- za tak krásné překvapení.

    Then comes the phrase – “for such a wonderful surprise..”
    The last word of this phrase corresponds with the English term “surprise.” The previous word is the adjective taking its neuter form in accordance with the noun.

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Všechno nejlepší k narozeninám!

    Her neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning – “Happy birthday!”
    This is a traditional birthday wish.

    2- Dnes je tvůj velký den!

    Her high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning – “Today is your great day!”
    Use this comment to keep the conversation going.

    3- Hodně zdraví a štěstí.

    Her husband, Libor, uses an expression meaning – “Good luck and health.”
    This is another fairly traditional birthday wish.

    4- Kolik ti je?

    Her college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning – “How old are you?”
    Ask this question if you want more personal detail about the poster’s birthday.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • všichni: “everybody “
  • narozeniny: “birthday”
  • dnes: “today”
  • štěstí: “luck”
  • je: “is”
  • den: “day”
  • velký: “great”
  • překvapení: “surprise”
  • If a friend posted something about birthday greetings, which phrase would you use?

    23. Talking about New Year on Social Media in Czech

    Impress your friends with your Czech New Year’s wishes this year. Learn the phrases easily!

    Libor celebrates the New Year, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    Šťastný Nový rok!
    “Happy New Year!”

    1- Šťastný

    First is an expression meaning “Happy.”
    This adjective is a staple of the most common Czech New Year’s greeting.

    2- Nový rok!

    Then comes the phrase – “New Year!.”
    This phrase, which usually starts with a capital letter, is the Czech equivalent of the word “new.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- Vám také! Ať se daří.

    His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning – “And to you too! All the best.”
    This is the appropriate, traditional response to the poster’s New Year’s wish.

    2- Nelučte se se starým rokem střízliví.

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning – “Don’t say goodbye to the previous year sober.”
    Use this expression to be humorous and to advise the poster to have a good time leaving the past behind.

    3- Všechno nejlepší do nového roku.

    His high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning – “All the best in the new year.”
    This is another positive, traditional New Year’s wish.

    4- Ať lítají rychlé špunty!

    His wife’s high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning – “Let the corks fly!”
    This is another way of saying: “Let’s party!”

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • šťastný: “happy”
  • také: “also”
  • loučit se: “to say goodbye “
  • nejlepší: “the best”
  • špunt: “cork”
  • lítat: “to fly”
  • nový: “new”
  • starý: “old”
  • Which is your favorite phrase to post on social media during New Year?

    But before New Year’s Day comes another important day…

    24. What to Post on Christmas Day in Czech

    What will you say in Czech about Christmas?

    Jana celebrates Christmas with her family, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Jana’s post.

    Pěkné prožití svátků vánočních.
    “Merry Christmas to you all.”

    1- Pěkné prožití

    First is an expression meaning “Nice experience.”
    This is the beginning of the second most common Christmas greeting. It literally means “nice living through” the Christmas.

    2- svátků vánočních.

    Then comes the phrase – “Christmas..”
    The second part of this formal greeting literally means “Christmas holidays.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Jana’s friends leave some comments.

    1- To bude dárků!

    Her high school friend, Věra, uses an expression meaning – “Looking forward to the gifts!”
    Use this expression to comment on the gifts, which is part of Christmas traditions in many cultures.

    2- Už máte nastrojený stromeček?

    Her college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning – “Did you already prepare the Christmas tree?”
    Ask this question to keep the conversation going, and to find out more details.

    3- Veselé vánoce!

    Her supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning – “Merry Christmas!”
    This is the common response to the poster’s Christmas blessing.

    4- Právě smažím kapra.

    Her husband’s high school friend, Dáša, uses an expression meaning – “I’m just frying the carp.”
    Carp is a traditional Christmas dish, so this comment relates to the Christmas dinner.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • svátky vánoční: “Christmas holidays”
  • dárek: “gift”
  • stromeček: “Christmas tree”
  • veselé: “merry”
  • kapr: “carp”
  • smažit: “to fry”
  • právě: “just”
  • vánoce: “Christmas”
  • If a friend posted something about Christmas greetings, which phrase would you use?

    So, the festive season is over! Yet, there will always be other days, besides a birthday, to wish someone well.

    25. Post about Your Anniversary in Czech

    Some things deserve to be celebrated, like wedding anniversaries. Learn which Czech phrases are meaningful and best suited for this purpose!

    Libor celebrates his wedding anniversary with his wife, posts an image of him and Jana, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down Libor’s post.

    Dneska máme výročí. Díky za všechno miláčku.
    “We have an anniversary today. Thank you for everything, darling.”

    1- Dneska máme výročí.

    First is an expression meaning “We have an anniversary today..”
    The first word means “today.” The second word is the verb “to have” in the first person plural form. And the last word means “anniversary.”

    2- Díky za všechno miláčku.

    Then comes the phrase – “Thanks for everything, darling..”
    The first word in this expression is a noun that means the same as the English word “thanks” and is used in informal spoken language. Formal Czech prefer to use the verb form, which corresponds to the English verb “to thank.”

    COMMENTS

    In response, Libor’s friends leave some comments.

    1- To jsi mě dojal.

    His wife, Jana, uses an expression meaning – “Your message is very touching.”
    Use this expression to say that you really like your husband’s post.

    2- Gratuluji a přeji hodně dalších společných let.

    His neighbor, Petra, uses an expression meaning – “Congratulations. I wish you many years together.”
    This is a warmhearted wish for a happy marriage, as well as a traditional congratulation.

    3- Děti, polibte se.

    His college friend, Jirka, uses an expression meaning – “Kiss each other, darlings.”
    This is a frivolous comment, using a term of endearment.

    4- Deset let spolu. Krásné!

    His supervisor, Luboš, uses an expression meaning – “Ten years together. Wonderful!”
    This is a comment on the length of the marriage.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • výročí: “anniversary”
  • dojmout: “to touch”
  • přát: “to wish”
  • políbit : “to kiss”
  • deset: “ten”
  • spolu: “together”
  • hodně: “many”
  • léta: “years”
  • If a friend posted something about Anniversary greetings, which phrase would you use?

    Conclusion

    Learning to speak a new language will always be easier once you know key phrases that everybody uses. These would include commonly used expressions for congratulations and best wishes, etc.

    Master these in fun ways with Learn Czech! We offer a variety of tools to individualize your learning experience, including using cell phone apps, audiobooks, iBooks and many more. Never wonder again what to say on social media!

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    How to Say Sorry in Czech

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    Learn how to apologize in Czech – fast and accurately! CzechClass101 makes it easy for you to make amends. Start with a bonus, and download your FREE cheat sheet – How to Improve Your Czech Skills! (Logged-In Member Only)

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    Table of Contents

    1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Czech
    2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Czech
    3. Audio Lesson – Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”
    4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Czech through CzechClass101

    1. Common Ways to Say Sorry in Czech

    3 Ways to Say Sorry

    Nobody’s perfect, not anywhere in the world. Everybody makes mistakes, and does and says regrettable things. Then it’s time to apologize, as saying ‘I’m sorry’ is not in vain. It can be very healing! Did you know that hearing a sincerely-meant apology can have a noticeable effect on a person’s body? Research has shown that it slows down breathing and heart rate, and even causes a drop in blood pressure.

    Sometimes we cannot fix what’s broken, but we can make the experience a bit easier for anyone who suffered on account of our thoughtless actions or words.

    Here are a number of ways to say sorry in Czech. In any language, just make sure you really mean it! An insincere apology will not go down well with anyone.

    Woman Apologizing

    Promiňte
    I’m sorry

    These words should precede anything else you have to say. Use them sincerely and whenever you are clearly in the wrong. Acknowledging your guilt and apologizing for any wrongdoing will lift your spirits too! Often, remorse can eat away at us, and a simple ‘I’m sorry’, in Czech or any other language, can open the door for forgiveness and resolution of a bad situation. It can be a true gift!

    Chtěl bych se omluvit.
    I would like to apologize.

    This is a slightly more formal way to say ‘I’m sorry’ in Czech. Use this phrase if you’re addressing your superiors and/or elders.

    Upřímně se omlouvám.
    I sincerely apologize.

    If you feel strongly about your apology, this is another slightly more formal phrase to use. Keep it handy for graver errors, or you might come across as insincere!

    Už to znovu neudělám.
    I won’t do it again.

    A promise you can only make if you intend to keep it! Few things feel as bad as having to hear repeated apologies from someone for the same behavior – it means the ‘sorry’ is not sincere. Don’t be that person!

    Slibuji, že příště stejnou chybu neuděláme.
    I’ll make sure not to make this mistake again.

    A beautifully strong phrase! Again, say this only if you mean it – not just in the moment, but always! A bit more formal, this is an especially good phrase to use when apologizing to superiors and/or elders. It will make an especially good impression at the workplace, where accountability is an excellent quality to display!

    To jsem nechtěl.
    I didn’t mean that.

    This is a tricky one… What did you mean, then?! Clear up any confusion with sincerity. Also, use this phrase only if the harm done or mistake made was due to an accident, and then admit to thoughtlessness on your part, if appropriate.

    Je to moje chyba.
    It’s my fault.

    If the fault is really yours, own up to it. You will gain respect in the eyes of others! However, don’t take the blame when it’s not truly yours. It won’t be good for you, and ultimately you will not be respected much for it.

    Omlouvám se za své sobectví.
    I’m sorry for being selfish.

    This is a good phrase to keep handy, especially for your close relationships. It is difficult to admit you’re selfish, isn’t it?! However, it’s good to know when to be honest. We get used to our loved ones, which often means we forget that they need our good manners and unselfish behavior just as much as strangers do.

    Doufám, že mi odpustíte.
    I hope you will forgive me.

    This is a polite and gentle wish that can smooth over many harsh feelings. It also shows that the other person’s opinion and forgiveness are important to you.

    Přebírám za to plnou odpovědnost.
    I take full responsibility.

    This strong statement is similar to admitting that an error or transgression was your fault. It speaks of courage and the willingness to take remedial action. Good one to use…if you mean it!

    Neměl jsem to dělat.
    I shouldn’t have done it.

    This phrase is fine to use if you did or said something wrong. It shows, to an extent, your regret for having done or said what you did, and demonstrates that you understand your role in the mistake.

    Omlouvám se, že jsem vám vrátil pozdě peníze.
    Sorry for giving your money back late.

    It’s rotten to have to loan money! Yet, it’s equally rotten to have to ask for the repayment of a loan. So, do your best not to pay late in the first place, but if it can’t be helped, this would be a good phrase to use!

    Prosím, nezlob se na mě.
    Please don’t be mad at me.

    Well, this is not a very advisable phrase to use if you are clearly in the wrong. If someone is justifiably angry with you, asking them not to be mad at you would be an unfair expectation. However, if you did something wrong by accident, and if the consequences were not too serious, this request would be OK.

    Promiň, mám zpoždění.
    Sorry I’m late.

    Punctuality is valued in most situations, but if you really cannot help being late, then apologize! This way you show respect for your host, and win their approval.

    Omlouvám se, že jsem na vás byla protivná.
    I apologize for being mean to you.

    Acknowledging your own meanness towards someone is no small thing, so good for you! Use this apology only if your intention is to seriously address your mean tendencies, or these words could become meaningless over time.

    2. How To Refuse Something Politely in Czech

    Woman Refusing

    Congratulations! Now you know how to apologize in Czech! After you have apologized for a mistake, focus on fixing whatever you can, and don’t punish yourself over something that cannot be taken back or reversed. That’s healthy for you! Regret can eat away at the soul, and even destroy it. It is ultimately a useless emotion if it consumes you.

    However, in language, we use apologies not only when we’ve transgressed or made mistakes. They come in handy in other situations too, when there has been no wrongdoing. Sometimes we need to express regret for having to refuse a gift, an offer, or an invitation. This can be somewhat tricky. Learn from specialists at CzechClass101 about how to use the correct Czech words for this kind of ‘sorry’!

    3. Survival Phrases “How to Say Sorry”

    Say Sorry

    On the run and need a quick lesson on how to say sorry in Czech? Don’t fret, just listen and repeat! Click here for a recorded short lesson and learn how to give the perfect apology, with perfect pronunciation in Czech. A little can go a long way, and you will sound like a native!

    4. Why You Will NOT Be Sorry For Learning Czech through CzechClass101

    Man Looking at Computer

    Online learning is here to stay, that’s a fact. In 2015, the Digital Learning Compass Partnership released a report based on surveys to determine online enrollment trends in US institutions for higher education. Thirty percent of all their students learned online! And the number is growing! However, how can you be sure you will not regret your choice of an online language learning school? First, look at the school’s credentials and what it has to offer…

    • Fun and Easy Learning: It’s a commonly-known fact that when learning is made easy and fun, student motivation rises. And as motivation rises, so does the effort to learn – what a beautiful cycle! CzechClass101’s language learning system is designed to get you speaking from the onset. Learn at your own convenience and pace with our short, effective and fun audio podcast lessons. Our Learning Center is comprehensive and state-of-the-art, with a vibrant user community to connect to! Our lessons are recorded with native hosts and voice actors, providing a diverse range of dialects in your lessons. You can be confident that native speakers will understand you when speaking Czech!
    • Innovative Learning Tools and Apps: We make it our priority to offer you the best learning tools! These include apps for iPhone, iPad, Android and Mac OSX; eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and iPad; audiobooks; Roku TV and so many more. This means that we took diverse lifestyles into account when we developed our courses, so you can learn anywhere, anytime on a device of your choice. How innovative!
    • Free Resources: Sharing is caring, and for this reason, we share many free resources with our students. For instance, start learning Czech with our basic online course by creating a lifetime account – for free! Also get free daily and iTunes lessons, free eBooks, free mobile apps, and free access to our blog and online community. Or how about free Vocabulary Lists? The Czech dictionary is for exclusive use by our students, also for free. There’s so much to love about CzechClass101…!
    • Live Hosts and One-on-One Learning: Knowledgeable, energetic hosts present recorded video lessons, and are available for live teaching experiences if you upgrade. This means that in the videos, you get to watch them pronounce those tongue-twisters, as if you’re learning live! Add octane to your learning by upgrading to Premium Plus, and learn two times faster. Your can have your very own Czech teacher always with you, ensuring that you learn what you need, when you need to – what a wonderful opportunity to master a new language in record time!
    • Start Where You Are: You don’t know a single Czech word? Not to worry, we’ve absolutely got this. Simply enroll in our Absolute Beginner Pathway and start speaking from Lesson 1! As your learning progresses, you can enroll in other pathways to match your Czech level, at your own pace, in your own time, in your own place!

    After this lesson, you will know almost every ‘sorry for’ in Czech, but don’t let it be that you’re sorry for missing a great opportunity. Learning a new language can only enrich your life, and could even open doors towards great opportunities! So don’t wonder if you’ll regret enrolling in CzechClass101. It’s the most fun, easy way to learn Czech!

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